Top Ten Underwater Ruins

Top Ten Underwater Ruins

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Underwater ruins have been found all over the world, most famously the ‘lost’ ruins of Atlantis, begging the question, is human “civilization” older than currently understood?

  1. Atlantis
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    Two scientists, Paul Weinzweig and Pauline Zalitzki, working off the coast of Cuba and using a robot submersible, have confirmed that a gigantic city exists at the bottom of the ocean. The site of the ancient city — that includes several sphinxes and at least four giant pyramids plus other structures — amazingly sits within the boundries of the fabled Bermuda Triangle. According to a report by Arclein of Terra Forming Terra, Cuban Subsea Pyramid Complex, the evidence points to the city being simultaneously inundated with rising waters and the land sinking into the sea. This correlates exactly with the Atlantis legend. The disaster may have occurred at the end of the last Ice Age. As the Arctic icecap catastrophically melted it caused sea levels to rise quickly around the world, especially affecting the Northern Hemisphere. Coast lines changed; land was lost; islands (even island continents) disappeared.
    Links: Pyramids, Top Ten Pyramids, Top Ten Caribbean Hotels, Top Ten Bahamas Hotelshttp://www.themindunleashed.org/2013/06/atlantis-found-giant-sphinxes-pyramids.html,
  2. Cleopatra’s Palace, Alexandria, Egypt

           Off the shores of Alexandria, the city of Alexander the Great, lies what is believed to be the ruins of the royal quarters of Cleopatra. A team of marine archaeologists led by Frenchman Franck Goddio made excavations on this ancient city from where Cleopatra, the last queen of the Ptolemies, ruled Egypt. Historians believe this site was submerged by earthquakes and tidal waves more than 1,600 years ago. The excavations concentrated on the submerged island of Antirhodus. Cleopatra is said to have had a palace there. Other discoveries include a well-preserved shipwreck and red granite columns with Greek inscriptions. Two statues were also found and were lifted out of the harbor. One was a priest of the goddess Isis; the other a sphinx whose face is said to represent Cleopatra’s father, King Ptolemy XII. The artifacts were returned to their silent, because the Egyptian Government says it wants to leave most of them in place to create an underwater museum.
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Attractions,  Top 100 Amazing Similarities/Parallel Anomalies, Top Ten Sphinx Sculptures, http://www.oddee.com/item_96695.aspx,
  3. Herakleion, Egypt

           Herakleion was Egypt’s main port in the time of the pharaohs. Until its rediscovery it was known only through Greek legends and a handful of ancient history books. Researchers believe the city was sent to the bottom of the Mediterranean after an earthquake rocked the region more than 1,000 years ago.
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Attractions, Top Ten Underwater Sculptures, http://nextrev.blogspot.com/2008/03/underwater-ruins.html,
  4. Pyramid off the Island of Cozumel, Mexico

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    Links: Top Ten Mexican Attractions, Pyramids, Top Ten North American Pyramids,
  5. Dwaraka, India

    Dwarka (Dvarka, Dwaraka, or Dvaraka, is a city in Gujarat state in India). Dwarka also known as Dwarawati in Sanskrit literature is rated as one of the seven most ancient cities in the country. The legendary city of Dvaraka was the dwelling place of Lord Krishna. It is believed that due to damage and destruction by the sea, Dvaraka has submerged six times and modern day Dwarka is the 7th such city to be built in the area. According to Hindu legend the god Krishna built a city which was ultimately destroyed by rising sea levels. Now archaeologists and Indian Navy divers are investigating underwater ruins at Dwarka on India’s western coast, said to be Krishna’s city. The new efforts, it is hoped, will settle the debate currently raging over the age and authenticity of the site near the Samudranaraya temple. Divers have collected blocks and samples which will now be dated. Traditional Hindu scholars referencing ancient Hindu scriptures believe the location to be very ancient, originally built many thousands of years ago. Such notions are, of course, vehemently rejected by establishment scientists though they are willing to concede that there is evidence indicating an age of as much as 3,500 years.
    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions, http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread657629/pg1,
  6. Lost City of the Seven Pagodas, Coast of Mahabalipuram, India

           According to popular belief, the famous Shore Temple at Mahabalipuram wasn’t a single temple, but the last of a series of seven temples, six of which had submerged. A major discovery of submerged ruins was made in April of 2002 offshore of Mahabalipuram in Tamil Nadu, South India. The discovery, at depths of 5 to 7 m (15 to 21 ft.) was made by a joint team from the Dorset based Scientific Exploration Society (SES) and marine archaeologists from India’s National Institute of Oceanography (NIO). Investigations at each of the locations revealed stone masonry, remains of walls, square rock cut remains, scattered square and rectangular stone blocks and a big platform with steps leading to it. All these lay amidst the locally occurring geological formations of rocks. Based on what at first sight appears to be a lion figure at location four, the ruins were inferred to be part of a temple complex. The Pallava dynasty, which ruled the region during the 7th century AD, was known to have constructed many such rock-cut, structural temples in Mahabalipuram and Kanchipuram.
    Links: http://nextrev.blogspot.com/2008/03/underwater-ruins.html,
  7. Yonaguni, Japan

           In the 1980’s, local divers discovered a striking underwater rock formation off the southernmost point of the island. This so-called Yonaguni Monument has staircase-like terraces with flat sides and sharp corners. Masaaki Kimura, a professor of seismology in University of the Ryukyus and some media believe it is an artificial (or artificially modified) structure engraved or built 2,000 to 3,000 years ago.
    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yonaguni,
  8. Pavlopetri
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    The city of Pavlopetri, underwater off the coast of southern Laconia in Greece, is about 5000 years old. This underwater site is unique. An entire town is resting underwater, including streets, buildings, courtyards, and tombs. It has at least 15 buildings submerged in three to four meters of water. Pavlopetri was presumably once a thriving harbor town where the inhabitants conducted local and long distance trade throughout the Mediterranean – its sandy and well-protected bay would have been ideal for beaching Bronze Age ships. As such the site offers major new insights into the workings of Mycenaean society. It was discovered in 1967 by Nicholas Flemming and mapped in 1968 by a team of archaeologists from Cambridge.
    Links: Top Ten Greek Attractionshttp://www.messagetoeagle.com/5underwaterruins.php#.Uhb27JIsnVU,
  9. Port Royal, Jamaica

           One of the advantages of marine or nautical archaeology is that, in many instances, catastrophic events send a ship or its cargo to the bottom, freezing a moment in time. A catastrophe that has helped nautical archeologists was the earthquake that destroyed part of the city of Port Royal, Jamaica. Once known as the “Wickedest City on Earth” for its sheer concentration of pirates, prostitutes and rum, Port Royal is now famous for another reason: “It is the only sunk city in the New World,” according to Donny L. Hamilton. Port Royal began its watery journey to the Academy Awards of nautical archeology on the morning of June 7th, 1692, when, in a matter of minutes, a massive earthquake sent nearly 33 acres of the city, buildings, streets, houses and their contents and occupants, careening into Kingston Harbor. Today, that underwater metropolis encompasses roughly 13 acres, at depths ranging from a few inches to 40 feet. In 1981, the Nautical Archaeology Program of Texas A&M University, in cooperation with the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA) and the Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT), began underwater archaeological investigations of the submerged portion of the 17th century town of Port Royal, Jamaica. Present evidence indicates that while the areas of Port Royal that lay along the edge of the harbor slid and jumbled as they sank, destroying most of the archaeological context, the area investigated by TAMU/INA, located some distance from the harbor, sank vertically, with minimal horizontal disturbance. In contrast to many archaeological sites, the investigation of Port Royal yielded much more than simply trash and discarded items. An unusually large amount of perishable, organic artifacts were recovered, preserved in the oxygen-depleted underwater environment. Together with the vast treasury of complimentary historical documents, the underwater excavations of Port Royal have allowed for a detailed reconstruction of everyday life in an English colonial port city of the late 17th century.
    Links: http://www.oddee.com/item_96695.aspx,
  10. Bimini Road

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  11. Arabian Sea Underwater Cities?
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