Top Ten South American Pyramids

Top Ten South American Pyramids

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  1.  Huaca del Sol (Pyramid of the Sun), Peru

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Peruvian Attractions,
  2. Sipan Pyramid, Peru
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Peruvian Attractions,
  3. Cahuachi Pyramids, Peru

    Cahuachi, in Peru, was a major ceremonial center of the Nazca culture, based from 1 AD-500 AD in the coastal area of the Central Andes. It overlooked some of the Nazca lines. The Italian archaeologist Giuseppe Orefici has been excavating at the site for the past few decades. The site contains over 40 mounds topped with adobe structures. The huge architectural complex covers 0.6 sq. miles (1.5 km2). The American archeologist Helaine Silverman has also conducted long term, multi-stage research and written about the full context of Nazca society at Cahuachi, published in a lengthy study in 1993. Scholars once thought the site was the capital of the Nazca state but have determined that the permanent population was quite small. They believe that it was a pilgrimage center, whose population increased greatly in relation to major ceremonial events. New research has suggested that 40 of the mounds were natural hills modified to appear as artificial constructions. Support for the pilgrimage theory comes from archaeological evidence of sparse population at Cahuachi, the spatial patterning of the site, and ethnographic evidence from the Virgin of Yauca pilgrimage in the nearby Ica Valley.
    Links: Top Ten Peruvian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cahuachi,
  4. Túcume Pyramids, Peru
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    Túcume is a pre-Hispanic site in Peru, south of the La Leche River on a plain around La Raya Mountain. It covers an area of over 540 acres (220 ha) and encompassing 26 major pyramids and mounds. The area is referred to as Purgatorio (purgatory) by local people. This site was a major regional center, maybe even the capital of the successive occupations of the area by the Lambayeque/Sican (800-1350 AD), Chimú (1350–1450 AD) and Inca (1450–1532 AD). Local shaman healers (curanderos) invoke power of Tucume and La Raya Mountain in their rituals, and local people fear these sites. Hardly anyone other than healers venture out in this site at night. The plains of Túcume are part of the Lambayeque Valley, the largest valley of the North Coast of Peru. The Lambayeque Valley is the site of scores of natural and man-made waterways and is also a region of about 250 brick pyramids.
    Links: Top Ten Peruvian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C3%BAcume,
  5. Caral Pyramids, Peru
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    Caral, or Caral-Supe, was a large settlement in the Supe Valley, near Supe, Barranca province, Peru, some 200 km north of Lima. Caral is the most ancient city of the Americas, and is a well-studied site of the Caral civilization or Norte Chico civilization.
    Links: Top Ten Peruvian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caral,
  6. San Isidro Pyramid, Peru

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Peruvian Attractions,
  7. Links: Pyramids, Top Ten Pyramids,