Top Ten Triumphal Arches

Top Ten Triumphal Arches

  1. Arc de Triomphe, Paris, France

    The Arc de Triomphe is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. It stands in the center of the Place Charles de Gaulle (originally named Place de l’Étoile), at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. There is a smaller arch, the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, which stands west of the Louvre. The Arc de Triomphe (in English: “Triumphal Arch”) honours those who fought and died for France in the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars, with the names of all French victories and generals inscribed on its inner and outer surfaces. Beneath its vault lies the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I. The Arc de Triomphe is the linchpin of the historic axis (Axe historique) – a sequence of monuments and grand thoroughfares on a route which goes from the courtyard of the Louvre, to the Grande Arche de la Défense. The monument was designed by Jean Chalgrin in 1806, and its iconographic program pitted heroically nude French youths against bearded Germanic warriors in chain mail. It set the tone for public monuments, with triumphant patriotic messages. The monument stands 50 metres (164 ft) in height, 45 m (148 ft) wide and 22 m (72 ft) deep. The large vault is 29.19 m (95.8 ft) high and 14.62 m (48.0 ft) wide. The small vault is 18.68 m (61.3 ft) high and 8.44 m (27.7 ft) wide. It is the second largest triumphal arch in existence (after Arch of Triumph in Pyongyang).[4] Its design was inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus. The Arc de Triomphe is so colossal that three weeks after the Paris victory parade in 1919, (marking the end of hostilities in World War I), Charles Godefroy flew his Nieuport biplane through it, with the event captured on newsreel.
    Links: Top Ten French Attractions,
  2. Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, France

           The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is a triumphal arch in Paris, located in the Place du Carrousel on the site of the former Tuileries Palace. It was built between 1806 and 1808 to commemorate Napoleon’s military victories the previous year. The more famous Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile, was designed in the same year, but it took 30 years to build and it is about twice as massive.
    Links: Top Ten French Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arc_de_Triomphe_du_Carrousel,
  3. Arch of Constantine

           The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected to commemorate Constantine I’s victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the latest of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, from which it differs by spolia, the extensive re-use of parts of earlier buildings.
    Links: Top Ten Italian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arch_of_Constantine,
  4. Triumphal Arch on Kutuzova Avenue, Russia

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    Links: Top Ten Russian Attractions,
  5. Arc de Triomf, Barcelona, Spain

           The Arc de Triomf is an archway structure in Barcelona, Spain. It was built for the Exposición Universal de Barcelona (1888), as its main access gate by architect Josep Vilaseca i Casanovas. The arch is built in reddish brickwork in the Neo-Mudéjar style. The front frieze contains the stone sculpture Barcelona rep les nacions (Catalan for “Barcelona welcomes the nations”) by Josep Reynés. The opposite frieze contains a stone carving entitled Recompense, a work from Josep Llimona’s the earliest period. The arch is located between Passeig de Lluís Companys and Passeig de Sant Joan, at the end of a wide promenade connecting with the Park of the Ciutadella.
    Links: Top Ten Spanish Attractions, Top Ten Barcelona Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arc_de_Triomf,
  6. Narva Triumphal Arch, St. Petersburg, Russia

           The Narva Triumphal Arch was erected in the vast Narva Square (known as the Stachek Square in Soviet years), Saint Petersburg, in 1814 to commemorate the Russian victory over Napoleon. The wooden structure was constructed on the Narva highway with the purpose of greeting the soldiers who were returning from abroad after their victory over Napoleon. The architect of the original Narva Arch was Giacomo Quarenghi. The program was meant to respond to the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris, originally erected to celebrate Napoleon’s victory over the Allies at Austerlitz, but the material used was a weather-resistant plaster that was never intended to be permanent. Between 1827 and 1834 Vasily Stasov redesigned and rebuilt the gate in stone. A similar gate, also by Stasov, was erected on the road leading to Moscow. A sculptor Vasily Demut-Malinovsky was responsible for the arch’s sculptural decor. As has been conventional since Imperial Roman times, sculptures of Fame offering laurel wreaths fill the spandrels of the central arch. The main entablature breaks boldly forward over paired Composite columns that flank the opening and support colossal sculptures. Nike, the Goddess of Victory surmounts the arch, in a triumphal car drawn by six horses, sculpted by Peter Clodt von Jürgensburg, instead of the traditional Quadriga. Neither the arch nor the Russian Admiralty were protected from artillery bombardments during the Siege of Leningrad. A small military museum was opened in the upper part of the arch in 1989. At the beginning of 21st century the gate was capitally restored and according to experts, is in a fine condition as of August 2009.
    Links: Top Ten Russian Attractions, Top Ten Sculptures by Peter Clodt von Jürgensburg, Top Ten Squares, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narva_Triumphal_Gate,
  7. Arcul de Triumf, Bucharest, Romania

           Arcul de Triumf is a triumphal arch located in the northern part of Bucharest, on the Kiseleff Road. The first, wooden, triumphal arch was built hurriedly, after Romania gained its independence (1878), so that the victorious troops could march under it. Another temporary arch was built on the same site, in 1922, after WWI, which was demolished in 1935 to make way for the current triumphal arch, which was inaugurated in September 1936. The current arch has a height of 27 meters and was built after the plans of the architect Petre Antonescu. The sculptures with which the facades are decorated were created by famous Romanian sculptors such as Ion Jalea and Dimitrie Paciurea. Nowadays, military parades are held beneath the arch each December 1, with the occasion of Romania’s national day.
    Links: Top Ten Romanian Attractions, Top Ten Sculptures by Dimitrie Paciurea, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arcul_de_Triumf,
  8. Siegestor, Munich, Germany

           The Siegestor (Victory Gate) in Munich, is a three-arched triumphal arch crowned with a statue of Bavaria with a lion-quadriga, similar in style to the Arch of Constantine in Rome, the Marble Arch in London, the Arc de Triomphe in Paris and the Brandenburger Tor in Berlin. It is located between the Ludwig Maximilian University and the Ohmstraße, where the Ludwigstraße (south) ends and the Leopoldstraße (north) begins. It thus sits at the boundary between the two Munich districts of Maxvorstadt and Schwabing.
    Links: Top Ten Gates, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siegestor,
  9. Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Arch

           The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Arch is a New York City memorial “To the Defenders of the Union, 1861-1865.” The eastern end with a stairway to the observation deck and crowning sculpture is open to the public, while the remainder of the interior is sometimes opened for art shows and performances (the western end with degraded stairway is only used for storage).
    Links: Sculptures, Top 100 North American Sculptures, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldiers%27_and_Sailors%27_Arch,
  10. Wellington Arch, London, England

           Wellington Arch, also known as Constitution Arch or the Green Park Arch, is a triumphal arch located to the south of Hyde Park in central London and at the north western corner of Green Park (although it is now isolated on a traffic island). The arch, and Marble Arch to the north of Hyde Park, were both planned in 1825 by George IV to commemorate Britain’s victories in the Napoleonic Wars. The Wellington Arch was also conceived as an outer gateway to Constitution Hill and therefore a grand entrance into central London from the west. The presence of a turnpike gate at this point had led, in the 18th century, to a strong perception that this was the beginning of London (reflected in the nickname for Apsley House as “No 1, London”) and the arch was intended to reflect the importance of the position.
    Links: Top Ten English Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_Arch,
  11. India Gate, New Delhi, India

    The India Gate is the national monument of India, situated in the heart of New Delhi. It was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens to commemorate the 70,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the British Army during WWI. The memorial bears the names of more than 13,516 British and Indian soldiers killed in the Northwestern Frontier in the Afghan war of 1919. The foundation stone of India Gate was laid by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught in 1921. The monument was dedicated to the nation 10 years later by the then Viceroy, Lord Irwin. Originally, a statue of George V, Emperor of India stood under the now vacant canopy in front of the India Gate, but it was removed to Coronation Park together with a number of other British Raj-era statues. Following India’s independence, the India Gate became the site of the Indian Armed Forces’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, known as Amar Jawan Jyoti (“the flame of the immortal soldier”).
    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/India_Gate,
  12. Triumphal Arch of Severus

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  13. Arch of Galerius

           The Arch of Galerius and the Rotunda are neighboring early 4th century monuments in the city of Thessaloniki, in the region of Central Macedonia in northern Greece. The Rotunda is also known as the Church of Agios Georgios or the Rotunda of St. George.
    Links: Top Ten Greek Attractions, Relieves and Petroglyphs, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arch_and_Tomb_of_Galerius,
  14. Marble Arch, London, England

           Marble Arch is a white Carrara marble monument that now stands on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road, almost directly opposite Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park in London, England. Until 1851 it stood in front of Buckingham Palace. Historically, only members of the royal family and the King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery, have been allowed to pass through the arch in ceremonial procession. The name “Marble Arch” also refers to the locality in west London where the arch is situated, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road. There also is an underground station named after it.
    Links: Top Ten English Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble_Arch,
  15. Marcus Aurelius Arch, Tripoli, Libya

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    Links: Top Ten Libyan Attractions,
  16. Triumphal Arche of Titus

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  17. Links: Top 100 Monuments, Top Ten Gates,