Top Ten Hittite Artifacts

Top Ten Hittite Artifacts

       Hittites is the conventional English-language term for an ancient people who spoke an Indo-European language and established a kingdom centered in Hattusa in northern Anatolia from the 18th century BC. In the 14th century BC, the Hittite Kingdom was at its height, encompassing central Anatolia, south-western Syria as far as Ugarit, and upper Mesopotamia. After 1180 BC, amid general turmoil in the Levant associated with the sudden arrival of the Sea Peoples, the kingdom disintegrated into several independent “Neo-Hittite” city-states, some of which survived until as late as the 8th century BC. The history of the Hittite civilization is known mostly from cuneiform texts found in the area of their kingdom and from diplomatic and commercial correspondence found in various archives in Egypt and the Middle East.

  1. Royal Sun Disk

    This is a sun disk found in the royal tombs at Alaca Hüyük point to possible Indo-European influence.
    Links: Top Ten Suns,
  2. Rhyon

    Description: from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
    Links:
  3. Egypto-Hittite Peace Treaty (1,258 BC)

    Description:
    Links:
  4. Teshub Slaying Illuyanka Relief

    Description:
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illuyanka,
  5. Relief

    Description:
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves,
  6. Relief of King Warpalawas Worshipping Tarhunt (Teshub)

           Tarhunt being worshipped by king Warpalawas of Tyana.
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves,
  7. Relief of Hittite God

    Description:
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves,
  8. Relief of Hittite Gods

    Description:
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves,
  9. Relief of Suppiluliuma II

           This is a relief of Suppiluliuma II, the last known king of the Hittite Empire.
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves,
  10. Relief of Tudhaliya IV

           This is a relief of Tudhaliya IV.
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves,
  11. Yazilikaya Relieves

           The most impressive Chamber is Chamber A, which contains rock-cut relief of 64 deities in procession. The left wall shows a procession of male deities, wearing the traditional kilts, pointed shoes and horned hats. Mountain gods are also shown with scaled skirts to symbolise the rocky mountains. The right wall shows a procession of female deities wearing crowns and long skirts. The only exception to this divide is the goddess of love and war, Shaushka (Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar/Inanna) who is shown on the male procession with two female attendants. This is likely to be because of her male attributes as the goddess of war. The processions lead to a central scene of the supreme couple of the pantheon; the storm-god Teshub and the sun-goddess Hebat. Teshub stands on two mountain gods whilst Hebat stands on a panther. Behind Hebat are shown their son Sharruma, daughter Alanzu and a granddaughter.
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaz%C4%B1l%C4%B1kaya,
  12. Hittite Musicians Relief

    Description:
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves,
  13. Chariot Relief

    Description:
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten Middle Eastern Relieves,
  14. Links: