Top Ten Asian Relieves

Top Ten Asian Relieves

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  1. Konark Sun Temple, India
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           Konark Sun Temple is a 13th century Sun Temple (also known as the Black Pagoda), at Konark, in Orissa. It was constructed from oxidized and weathered ferruginous sandstone by King Narasimhadeva I (1238-1250 AD) of the Eastern Ganga Dynasty. The temple is an example of Orissan architecture of Ganga dynasty. The temple is one of the most renowned temples in India and is one of the Seven Wonders of India. Legend has it that the temple was constructed by Samba, the son of Lord Krishna. It is said that Samba was afflicted by leprosy, brought about by his father’s curse on him. After 12 years of penance, he was cured by Surya, the Sun God, in whose honor he built the magnificent Konark Sun Temple.
    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions, Temples, Top Ten Sun Temples, Top Ten Hindu Deities, Sculptures, Top Ten Relieves, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konark_Sun_Temple,
  2. Buddha
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha,
  3. Indian Vimana Relieve, Ellora Caves

    Vimāna is a word with several meanings ranging from temple or palace to flying palaces, or flying craft, as described in Sanskrit epics.
    Links: Top Ten Rock-Cut Architecture, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vimana,
  4. Cambodian Naga Portal and Naga Personification

    Nāga is the Sanskrit and Pāli word for a deity or class of entity or being, taking the form of a very great snake, specifically the king cobra, found in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. A female nāga is a nāgī or nāgiṇī. In these traditions the snake can also represent the kundalini energy, which travels up through the spine to the crown of the human body.
    Links:
  5. Sri Mahamariamman Temple
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    Links: Top Ten Indian AttractionsTemples, Top Ten Indian Temples,
  6. Temple at Khajuraho, India
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions, Temples, Top Ten Indian Temples,
  7. Bas-relief Depicting Ravana Shaking Mount Kailasa, the Abode of Lord Siva, Banteay Srei, Cambodia
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Cambodian Attractions, Top Ten Hindu Gods, Top Ten Mountains, Top Ten Asian Mountains,
  8. Yazılıkaya, Turkey
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    Yazılıkaya (Turkish for “inscribed rock”) was a sanctuary of Hattusa, the capital city of the Hittite Empire, today in the Çorum Province, Turkey. This was a holy site for the Hittites, located within walking distance of the gates of the city of Hattusa. It had two main chambers formed inside a group of rock outcrops. Access to the roofless chambers were controlled by gateway and building structures built right in front of them, however only the foundations of those structures survived today. Most impressive today are the rock-cut reliefs of Chambers A and B portraying the gods of the Hittite pantheon. One of the uses of the sanctuary may have involved the New Year’s celebrations ceremonies. It was in use at least since late 16th century BC, but most of the rock carvings date to the reign of the Hittite kings Tudhaliya IV and Suppiluliuma II in the late 13th century BC, when the site underwent a significant restoration.
    Links: Top Ten Turkish Attractions, Top Ten Sanctuaries, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yazilikaya,
  9. Durga Slays Mahishasura, Mahabalipuram
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    In Hinduism, Durga, meaning “the inaccessible” or “the invincible,” is a form of Devi, the supremely radiant goddess, depicted as having many (variously, up to eighteen) arms, riding a lion or a tiger, carrying weapons and a lotus flower, maintaining a meditative smile, and practicing mudras, or symbolic hand gestures. For Shaktas the eternal virgin Durga is Adi Shakti (the original power very power), Adi Maya (the original illusion caster) and the material manifestation of the Brahman (Supreme Absolute Godhead).  An embodiment of creative feminine force (Shakti), Durga exists in a state of svātantrya (independence from the universe and anything/anybody else, i.e., self-sufficiency) and fierce compassion. Durga manifests fearlessness and patience, and never loses her sense of humor, even during spiritual battles of epic proportion. At the Durga Puja festival, Durga is shown as the mother of Ganesha, Lakshmi and Saraswati.
    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durga,
  10. Iranian Emperor Shapur I, Naqsh-e Rustam, Iran
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           This is a rock-face relief at Naqsh-e Rustam of Iranian emperor Shapur I (on horseback) capturing Roman emperor Valerian (kneeing) and Philip the Arab (standing).
    Links: Top Ten Iranian Attractions,
  11. Bas-Relief Sculptures at Unakoti, Tripura, India
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    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions, Sculptures,
  12. Asita Relief
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           Asita was a hermit ascetic of ancient India in the 6th century BC. He is best known for having predicted that Prince Siddhartha of Kapilavastu would either become a great king (chakravartin) or become a supreme religious leader (Buddha).
    Links: Buddhists, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asita,
  13. Links: Artifacts, Top 100 Asian Artifacts, Top Ten Relieves, Top 100 Symbols,