Top Ten Egyptian Relieves

Top Ten Egyptian Relieves

45

  1. King Tut’s Throne Relief
    21
    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Kings, Top Ten Thrones,
  2. Akhenaten and Nerfertiti
    3
    Description:
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  3. Akhenaten and Nefertiti Worshiping the Sun Disk Aten
    4
    Description:
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  4. Aeronautic Hieroglyphs

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Spacecraft, Top Ten Aircraft,
  5. Egyptian Lights in Dendera?

    Description:
    Links: Top 100 Scientists, Top Ten Emerging Energy Technologies, Top Ten Inventors, Top Ten Inventions,
  6. Akhenaten Depicted as a Sphinx at Amarna
    1
    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Sphinx Statues,
  7. Ptah Relieves
    23
    Ptah (Egyptian ptḥ, probably vocalized as Pitaḥ in ancient Egyptian) was a deity in ancient Egyptian religion. Ptah was the deification of the primordial mound in the Ennead cosmogony, which was more literally referred to as Ta-tenen (also spelled Tathenen, Tatjenen, etc.), meaning risen land, or as Tanen, meaning submerged land, though Tatenen was a god in his own right, before being assimilated with Ptah. Ptah also is referred to as the noble Djed. It was said (in the Shabaka Stone) that it was Ptah who called the world into being, having dreamt creation in his heart, and speaking it, his name meaning opener, in the sense of opener of the mouth. Indeed the opening of the mouth ceremony, performed by priests at funerals to release souls from their corpses, was said to have been created by Ptah. Atum was said to have been created by Ptah to rule over the creation, sitting upon the primordial mound. In art, he is portrayed as a bearded mummified man, often wearing a skull cap, with his hands holding an ankh, was, and djed, the symbols of life, power and stability, respectively. It was also considered that Ptah manifested himself in the Apis bull. He may have originally been a fertility god because of this. Since Ptah was the primordial mound, and had called creation into being, he was considered the god of craftsmen, and in particular stone-based crafts. Eventually, due to the connection of these things to tombs, and that at Thebes, the craftsmen regarded him so highly as to say that he controlled their destiny. Consequently, first amongst the craftsmen, then the population as a whole, Ptah also became a god of regeneration. Since Seker was also god of craftsmen, and of regeneration of the sun during the night, Seker was later assimilated with Ptah becoming Ptah-Seker. Consequently, Ptah-Seker became considered an underworld deity, and eventually, by the Middle Kingdom, become assimilated by Osiris, the lord of the underworld, occasionally being known as Ptah-Seker-Osiris. The English name Egypt derives from an ancient Egyptian name for Memphis, Hikuptah, which means “Home of the Soul of Ptah.” This entered Ancient Greek as Αιγυπτος (Aiguptos), which entered Latin as Ægyptus, which developed into English as Egypt.
    Links: Top Ten Gods, Top Ten Egyptian Gods, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ptah,
  8. Luxor Temple Relief
    4
    This is a sunk relief as low relief within a sunk outline, from the Luxor Temple in Egypt, which carved in very hard granite.
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Gods,
  9. Sethi I, Abydos Temple
    5
    Menmaatre Seti I (or Sethos I as in Greek) was a Pharaoh of the New Kingdom 19th dynasty of Egypt, the son of Ramesses I and Queen Sitre, and the father of Ramesses II. As with all dates in Ancient Egypt, the actual dates of his reign are unclear, and various historians claim different dates, with 1294 BC – 1279 BC and 1290 BC to 1279 BC being the most commonly used by scholars today. The name Seti means “of Set,” which indicates that he was consecrated to the god Set (commonly “Seth”). As with most Pharaohs, Seti had several names. Upon his ascension, he took the prenomen mn-m3‘t-r‘, usually vocalized as Menmaatre, in Egyptian, which means “Eternal is the Justice of Re.” His better known nomen, or birth name, is transliterated as sty mry-n-ptḥ, or Sety Merenptah, meaning “Man of Set, beloved of Ptah.” Manetho incorrectly considered him to be the founder of the 19th dynasty, and gave him a reign length of 55 years, though no evidence has ever been found for so long a reign.
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Temples, Top Ten Egyptian Temples, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seti_I,
  10. Pharaoh Relief

    Description:
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  11. Isis Relief
    6
    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Gods, Top Ten Goddesses, Top Ten Gods,
  12. Seth and Horus
    67
    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Egyptian Gods,
  13. Links: Top Ten Relieves, Top Ten African Relieves, Top 100 Artifacts, Top 100 African Artifacts, Top Ten Egyptian Attractions,