Top Ten European Relieves

Top Ten European Relieves

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  1. The Elgin Marbles
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    The Parthenon Marbles, forming a part of the collection known as the Elgin Marbles, are a collection of classical Greek marble sculptures (mostly by Phidias and his pupils), inscriptions and architectural members that originally were part of the Parthenon and other buildings on the Acropolis of Athens. Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin, the British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire from 1799–1803, had obtained a controversial permit from the Ottoman authorities to remove pieces from the Acropolis. From 1801 to 1812 Elgin’s agents removed about half of the surviving sculptures of the Parthenon, as well as architectural members and sculpture from the Propylaea and Erechtheum. The Marbles were transported by sea to Britain. In Britain, the acquisition of the collection was supported by some, while other critics compared Elgin’s actions to vandalism or looting. Following a public debate in Parliament and subsequent exoneration of Elgin’s actions, the marbles were purchased by the British government in 1816 and placed on display in the British Museum, where they stand now on view in the purpose-built Duveen Gallery. The debate continues as to whether the Marbles should remain in the British Museum or be returned to Athens.
    Links: Sculptures, Top Ten Greek Sculptures, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elgin_Marbles,
  2. Dionysian Procession on a Marble Sarcophagus and a Roman Sarcophagus
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Sarcophagi, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dionysus,
  3. Romanesque Portal of Christ in Majesty (12th Century)
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    Description:
    Links:
  4. Roman Sarcophagus (250 AD)
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           This is a 3rd century Roman sarcophagus depicting soldiers battling Gothic troops It currently resides in the  National Museum of Rome.
    Links: Top Ten Italian Attractions, Artifacts, Top 100 Roman ArtifactsTop Ten Artifacts at the National Museum of Rome, Museums, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Empire,
  5. Tomb of King Pedro I
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    Peter I (19 April 1320 – 18 January 1367), called the Just, was King of Portugal and the Algarve from 1357 until his death. He was the third but only surviving son of Afonso IV of Portugal and his wife, princess Beatrice of Castile.
    Links: Top Ten Monasteries, Top Ten European Monasteries, Top Ten Tombs, Top Ten Kings, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_I_of_Portugal,
  6. Harbaville Triptych
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           The Harbaville Triptych is a Byzantine ivory triptych of the middle of the 10th century AD with a Deesis and other saints, now in the Louvre. Traces of coloring can still be seen on some figures. It is regarded as the finest, and best-preserved, of the “Romanos group” of ivories from a workshop in Constantinople, probably closely connected with the Imperial Court. The group takes its name from another ivory in the Cabinet des Médailles of the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris showing Christ crowning an Emperor, named as Romanos, and his Empress. This is thought to be either Romanos II crowned in 959, or possibly Romanos IV, crowned in 1068. Other related works are in Rome, the Vatican, and Moscow, this last another coronation probably datable to 944. The Harbaville Triptych is considered “by far the finest, for it shows an elegance and delicacy which are absent in the others. All are in the polished, elegant style typical of the Court school.” Other groups have also been identified, presumably representing the output of different workshops, perhaps also employed by the Court, but generally of lower quality, or at least refinement. Since much greater numbers of ivories survive than panel paintings from the period, they are very important for the history of Macedonian art. All sides of the triptych are fully carved, with more saints on the outsides of the side leaves, and an elaborate decorative scheme on the back of the central leaf.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harbaville_Triptych,
  7. Gates of Paradise by Lorenzo Ghiberti
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiberti,
  8. The Last Supper, Wieliczka Salt Mine, Poland
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Polish Attractions, Top Ten Paintings of the Last Supper, Top Ten Paintings by Leonardo da Vinci,
  9. Expulsion from Paradise by Lorenzo Maitani, Orvieto Cathedral, Italy
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Italian Attractions, Top Ten Cathedrals, Top Ten European Cathedrals, Top Ten Gardens,
  10. Atropos
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           Atropos or Aisa, in Greek mythology, was one of the three Moirai, goddesses of fate and destiny. Her Roman equivalent was Morta. Atropos or Aisa was the oldest of the Three Fates, and was known as the “inflexible” or “inevitable.” It was Atropos who chose the mechanism of death and ended the life of each mortal by cutting their thread with her “abhorred shears.” She worked along with her two sisters, Clotho, who spun the thread, and Lachesis, who measured the length.
    Links: Top Ten Goddesses, Top Ten Greek Gods, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atropos,
  11. Links: Top Ten Relieves, Artifacts,