Top Ten Relieves

Top Ten Relieves

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  1. Tree of Life Relieves
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    The concept of a tree of life, a many-branched tree illustrating the idea that all life on earth is related, has been used in science, religion, philosophy, mythology and other areas. A tree of life is variously: a motif in various world theologies, mythologies and philosophies; a mystical concept alluding to the interconnectedness of all life on our planet; and a metaphor for common descent in the evolutionary sense. According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, the tree of knowledge, connecting to heaven and the underworld, and the tree of life, connecting all forms of creation, are both forms of the world tree or cosmic tree. According to some scholars, the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, portrayed in various religions and philosophies, are the same tree. According to others, however, the tree of life concept is distinct from the tree of knowledge of good and bad, if only because eating from the latter leads to death and not life, and because it is mentioned in Genesis that there exists a distinct tree of life in the Garden of Eden (although humans are barred from entry to the Garden by the time it is mentioned). The Abrahamic religions are Semitic in origin, and not Indo-European- which might serve to explain relegating the idea of a cosmological tree to esoteric sects (e.g. Kabballah) in most Semitic cultures.
    Links: Top 100 Sumerian Artifacts, Top 100 Cannabis Strains, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_of_life,
  2. Konark Sun Temple, India
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    Konark Sun Temple is a 13th century Sun Temple (also known as the Black Pagoda), at Konark, in Orissa. It was constructed from oxidized and weathered ferruginous sandstone by King Narasimhadeva I (1238-1250 AD) of the Eastern Ganga Dynasty. The temple is an example of Orissan architecture of Ganga dynasty. The temple is one of the most renowned temples in India and is one of the Seven Wonders of India. Legend has it that the temple was constructed by Samba, the son of Lord Krishna. It is said that Samba was afflicted by leprosy, brought about by his father’s curse on him. After 12 years of penance, he was cured by Surya, the Sun God, in whose honor he built the magnificent Konark Sun Temple.
    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions, Temples, Top Ten Indian Temples, Top Ten Sun Temples, Top Ten Hindu Deities, Sculptures, Top Ten Asian Relieves, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konark_Sun_Temple,
  3. Annunaki Relief
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    Description:
    Links: Top 100 Sumerian Artifacts,
  4. King Tut’s Throne Relief
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    This relief, which appears on the legendary golden throne of King Tutankhamen, depicts…
    Links: Top 100 Egyptian ArtifactsTop Ten Egyptian Attractions, Top Ten Pharoahs, Top Ten Queens,
  5. Akhenaten and Nerfertiti
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    Description:
    Links: Top 100 Egyptian ArtifactsTop Ten Egyptian Attractions, Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Queens,
  6. Akhenaten and Nefertiti Worshiping the Sun Disk Aten
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    Description:
    Links: Top 100 Egyptian ArtifactsTop Ten Egyptian Attractions, Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Queens,
  7. Aeronautic Hieroglyphs

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    Links: Top Ten SpacecraftTop Ten Aircraft,
  8. Egyptian Lights in Dendera?

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    Links: Top 100 ScientistsTop Ten Emerging Energy Technologies, Top Ten InventorsTop Ten Inventions,
  9. Buddha
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    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha,
  10. Seth and Horus
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    Description:
    Links: Top 100 Egyptian Artifacts, Top Ten Egyptian Attractions,
  11. Behistun Inscription and Ahura Mazda Relieves, Iran
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    The Behistun Inscription, meaning “the place of god,” is a multi-lingual inscription located on Mount Behistun in the Kermanshah Province of Iran, near the city of Kermanshah in western Iran. Authored by Darius the Great sometime between his coronation as king of the Persian Empire in the summer of 522 BC and his death in autumn of 486 BC, the inscription begins with a brief autobiography of Darius, including his ancestry and lineage. Later in the inscription, Darius provides a lengthy sequence of events following the deaths of Cyrus the Great and Cambyses II in which he fought 19 battles in a period of one year (ending in December of 521 BC) to put down multiple rebellions throughout the Persian Empire. The inscription states in detail that the rebellions, which had resulted from the deaths of Cyrus the Great and his son Cambyses II, were orchestrated by several impostors and their co-conspirators in various cities throughout the empire, each of whom falsely proclaimed kinghood during the upheaval following Cyrus’s death. Darius the Great proclaimed himself victorious in all battles during the period of upheaval, attributing his success to the “grace of Ahura Mazda.” The inscription includes three versions of the same text, written in three different cuneiform script languages: Old Persian, Elamite and Babylonian (a later form of Akkadian). In effect, then, the inscription is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: the document most crucial in the decipherment of a previously lost script. The inscription is approximately 15 m high by 25 m wide and 100 m up a limestone cliff from an ancient road connecting the capitals of Babylonia and Media (Babylon and Ecbatana, respectively). The Old Persian text contains 414 lines in five columns; the Elamite text includes 593 lines in eight columns, and the Babylonian text is in 112 lines. The inscription was illustrated by a life-sized bas-relief of Darius I, the Great, holding a bow as a sign of kingship, with his left foot on the chest of a figure lying on his back before him. The supine figure is reputed to be the pretender Gaumata. Darius is attended to the left by two servants, and nine one-meter figures stand to the right, with hands tied and rope around their necks, representing conquered peoples. Faravahar floats above, giving his blessing to the king. One figure appears to have been added after the others were completed, as was Darius’s beard, which is a separate block of stone attached with iron pins and lead.
    Links: Top Ten Gods, Top Ten Babylonian Artifacts, Top Ten Iranian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahura_Mazda,
  12. Sri Mahamariamman Temple
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    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions, Temples, Top Ten Indian Temples,
  13. Relief of the Apotheosis of Homer (2nd Century BC)
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    The Apotheosis of Homer is a common scene in classical and neo-classical art, showing the poet Homer’s apotheosis or elevation to divine status. Homer was the subject of a number of formal hero cults in classical antiquity. The earliest notable portrayal of the scene is a 3rd century BC marble relief by Archelaus of Priene, now in the British Museum. It was found in Italy, probably in 1658 AD, but is thought to have been sculpted in Egypt. It shows Ptolemy and his wife or sister Arsinoe III standing beside a seated poet, flanked by figures from the Odyssey and Iliad, with the nine Muses standing above them and a procession of worshippers approaching an altar, believed to represent the Alexandrine Homereion. Apollo, the god of music and poetry, also appears, along with a female figure tentatively identified as Mnemosyne, the mother of the Muses. Zeus, the king of the gods, presides over the proceedings. The relief demonstrates vividly that the Greeks considered Homer not merely a great poet but the divinely-inspired reservoir of all literature.
    Links: Top 100 Greek Artifacts, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Apotheosis_of_Homer,
  14. Links: Artifacts, Sculptures, Top Ten Stelae,