Top Ten Sarcophagi

Top Ten Sarcophagi

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       A sarcophagus is a funeral receptacle for a corpse, most commonly carved or cut from stone. The word “sarcophagus” comes from the Greek σάρξ sarx meaning “flesh,” and φαγεῖν phagein meaning “to eat,” hence sarkophagus means “flesh-eating”; from the phrase lithos sarkophagos. Since lithos is Greek for stone, lithos sarcophagos means ‘flesh eating stone.’ The word came to refer to a particular kind of limestone that was thought to decompose the flesh of corpses interred within it.

  1. King Tut
    3456King Tut with Wife Thronking tut tomb
    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Kings,
  2. Dionysian Procession on a Marble Sarcophagus and a Roman Sarcophagus
    78
    Description:
    Links: Relieves and Petroglyphs, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dionysus,
  3. Gilded Coffin of Tjuya
    910
    Description:
    Links:
  4. Sarcophagus of Charlemagne
    12
    Description:
    Links: Top 100 Busts,
  5. Pakal’s Sarcophagus
    345
    K’inich Janaab’ Pakal (23 March 603 – 28 August 683) was ruler of the Maya polity of Palenque in the Late Classic period of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican chronology. During a long reign of some 68 years Pakal was responsible for the construction or extension of some of Palenque’s most notable surviving inscriptions and monumental architecture.
    Links: Top 100 Busts, Relieves and Petroglyphs, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacal_the_great,
  6. Sarcophagus of Thutmose I
    67
    Thutmose I (sometimes read as Thothmes, Thutmosis or Tuthmosis I, meaning Thoth-Born) was the 3rd Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. He was given the throne after the death of the previous king Amenhotep I. During his reign, he campaigned deep into the Levant and Nubia, pushing the borders of Egypt further than ever before. He also built many temples in Egypt and built a tomb for himself in the Valley of the Kings; he is the first king confirmed to have done this (though Amenhotep I may have preceded him). He was succeeded by his son Thutmose II, who in turn was succeeded by Thutmose II’s sister, Hatshepsut. His reign is generally dated from 1506 to 1493 BC, but a minority of scholars, who feel that astrological observations used to calculate the timeline of ancient Egyptian records and thus the reign of Thutmose I, were taken from the city of Memphis rather than from Thebes, would date his reign from 1526 BC to 1513 BC.
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Top 100 Busts, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thutmose_I,
  7. Helena Sarcophagus
    8
    Saint Helena also known as Saint Helen, Helena Augusta or Helena of Constantinople (ca. 246/50 – 18 August 330) was the consort of Emperor Constantius, and the mother of Emperor Constantine the Great. She is traditionally credited with finding the relics of the True Cross, with which she is invariably represented in Christian iconography.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helena_of_Constantinople,
  8. Amazonomachy Marble Sarcophagus
    9
    Description:
    Links:
  9. Sarcophagus of Margrethe I, Denmark
    10
    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Danish Attractions,
  10. Akhenaten Sarcophagus
    11
           Akhenaten (“living spirit of Aten”) known before the fifth year of his reign as Amenhotep IV, was a Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt who ruled for 17 years and died perhaps in 1336 BC or 1334 BC. He is especially noted for abandoning traditional Egyptian polytheism and introducing worship centered on the Aten, the sun. Akhenaten tried to bring about a departure from traditional religion. After his death, traditional religious practice was gradually restored, and when some dozen years later rulers without clear rights of succession from the 18th Dynasty founded a new dynasty, they discredited Akhenaten and his immediate successors, referring to Akhenaten himself as “the enemy” in archival records. He was all but lost from history until the discovery, in the 19th century, of Amarna, the site of Akhetaten, the city he built for the Aten. Early excavations at Amarna by Flinders Petrie sparked interest in the enigmatic pharaoh, whose tomb was unearthed in 1907 in a dig led by Edward R. Ayrton. Interest in Akhenaten increased with the discovery in the Valley of the Kings, at Luxor, of the tomb of King Tutankhamun, who has been proved to be Akhenaten’s son according to DNA testing in 2010. A mummy found in KV55 in 1907 has been identified as that of Akhenaten. This man and Tutankhamun are related without question, but the identification of the KV55 mummy as Akhenaten has been questioned. Modern interest in Akhenaten and his queen, Nefertiti, comes partly from his connection with Tutankhamun, partly from the unique style and high quality of the pictorial arts he patronized, and partly from ongoing interest in the religion he attempted to establish.
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs,
  11. Links: Top Ten Mummies,