Top Ten Staffs/Rods

Top Ten Staffs/Rods

10162

  1. Staff of Moses
    3456
    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Statues by Michelangelo, Top Ten Mosaics, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses,
  2. Aaron’s Rod
    789
    Aaron’s rod refers to any of the staves carried by Moses’ brother, Aaron, in the Old Testament of the Bible. The Bible tells how, along with Moses’ rod, Aaron’s rod was endowed with miraculous power during the Plagues of Egypt which preceded the Exodus. There are two occasions where the Bible tells of the rod’s power even when it was not being held by its owner.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron%27s_rod,
  3. Rod of Asclepius
    1234
    The rod of Asclepius, also known as the asklepian, is an ancient symbol associated with astrology, the Greek god Asclepius, and with medicine and healing. It consists of a serpent entwined around a staff. The name of the symbol derives from its early and widespread association with Asclepius, the son of Apollo, who was a practitioner of medicine in ancient Greek mythology. His attributes, the snake and the staff, sometimes depicted separately in antiquity, are combined in this symbol. The Rod of Asclepius also represents the constellation Ophiuchus (or Ophiuchus Serpentarius), considered by some to be the 13th sign of the sidereal zodiac. Hippocrates himself was a worshipper of Asclepius.
    Links: Sculptures, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_of_Asclepius,
  4. Caduceus of Hermes
    56789
    The caduceus is a herald’s staff, a symbolic object representing Hermes (or the Roman Mercury), and by extension trades, occupations or undertakings associated with the god. It is today typically depicted as a short staff entwined by two serpents in the form of a double helix, and is sometimes surmounted by wings. This staff was also borne by Iris, the messenger of Hera. In later Antiquity the caduceus provided the basis for the astrological symbol representing the planet Mercury and in Roman iconography was often depicted being carried in the left hand of Mercury, the messenger of the gods, guide of the dead and protector of merchants, shepherds, gamblers, liars and thieves.
    Links: Top Ten Greek Gods, Top Ten Vases, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caduceus,
  5. Tapac-Yauri (Golden Staff of Manco Cápac)
    10
           In one myth, Manco Cápac was a son of the sun god Inti and Mama Quilla, and brother of Pacha Kamaq. Manco Cápac himself was worshiped as a fire and a Sun God. According to the Inti legend, Manco Cápac and his siblings were sent up to the earth by the sun god and emerged from the cave of Pacaritambo carrying a golden staff, called tapac-yauri. Instructed to create a Temple of the Sun in the spot where the staff sank into the earth, they traveled to Cusco via underground caves and there built a temple in honor of their father Inti.
    Links: Top Ten Kings, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manco_Capac,
  6. Elijah’s Rod (1884)
    11
           This is a copy of Elijah’s rod from Afghanistan.
    Links: Top Ten Afghani Artifacts,
  7. Elijah’s Rod (19th Century)
    1213
           This is a copy of Elijah’s rod from Bukhara, Uzbekistan.
    Links:
  8. Elijah’s Rod (1847)
    14
           This is a copy of Elijah’s rod that is from Caucasus, Azerbaijan, Shirvan.
    Links:
  9. Jacob’s Staff
    1516
           The Jacob’s staff, also called a cross-staff, a ballastella or a fore-staff, is used to refer to several things. This can lead to considerable confusion unless one clarifies the purpose for the object so named. The most frequent uses of the terms are for astronomy and navigation and for surveying.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob%27s_staff,
  10. Links: Artifacts, Top 100 Symbolshttp://cja.huji.ac.il/Ritual_Objects/Uzbekistan/Elijah%27s%20rod_%20Uzbekistan_%20Bukhara_%2019th%20c_%20Sc_%20238-12.html,