Top Ten African Cave/Rock Paintings

Top Ten African Cave/Rock Paintings

  1. Tassili-n-Ajjer Rock Painting, Algeria (6,000-4,000 BC)

    This rock paintings found in Tassili-n-Ajjer, modern day Algeria depict dance performances, and wildlife and are attributed to the Saharan period of Neolithic hunters.
    Links: Top Ten Algerian Attractions,
  2. Tassili (6,000 BC)

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  3. Navoy Rock Drawings

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  4. Laas Gaal (9,000-8,000 BC and 3,000 BC)

    Laas Gaal is a complex of caves and rock shelters in Somaliland (a breakaway region in northwestern Somalia) that is famous for its cave paintings. The caves are located in a rural area on the outskirts of Hargeisa and contain some of the earliest known rock art in the Horn of Africa and the African continent in general.
    Links: Top Ten Somalian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laas_Gaa%27l,
  5. African Figures

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  6. Ukhahlamba-Drakensberg (1,000 BC)

    The Ukhahlamba-Drakensberg art is believed to be 3,000 years old, painted by the San people who settled the area 8,000 years ago. The paintings depict animals and humans, and are thought to represent religious beliefs. Human figures are much more common in African cave paintings than in European art.
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  7. Cave of Swimmers, Egypt (8,000 BC)

    The Cave of Swimmers is a cave in southwest Egypt, near the border with Libya, in the mountainous Gilf Kebir region of the Sahara Desert. It was discovered in October 1933 by the Hungarian explorer László Almásy. It contains rock painting images of people swimming estimated to have been created 10,000 years ago during the time of the most recent Ice Age. Almásy devoted a chapter to the cave in his 1934 book The Unknown Sahara. In it he postulates that the swimming scenes are real depictions of life at the time of painting and that there had been a change in climate since that time. This theory was so new at that time that his first editor added several footnotes, to make it clear that he did not share this opinion.
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cave_of_Swimmers,
  8. Apollo 11 Cave Paintings (25,500–23,500 BC)

    The seven slabs of rock with traces of animal figures that were found in the Apollo 11 Cave in the Huns Mountains of southwestern Namibia have been dated with unusual precision for ancient rock art. Originally brought to the site from elsewhere, the stones were painted in charcoal, ocher, and white. Until recently, the Apollo 11 stones were the oldest known artwork of any kind from the African continent. More recent discoveries of incised ocher date back almost as far as 100,000 BC, making Africa home to the oldest images in the world.
    Links: Top Ten Astronauts, Top Ten Namibian Attractions,
  9. Wonderwerk (8,000 BC)

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  10. Fezzen Region of Southwestern Libya 

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  11. Ennedi 

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  12. Air MountainsDescription:
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  13. Rhodesia Rock DrawingDescription:
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  14. Links: Top Ten Cave Paintings, Caves, Top Ten African Caves, African Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cave_painting,