Northern Renaissance

Northern Renaissance

Top Ten Northern Renaissance Painters

Top Ten Northern Renaissance Painter

Albrecht Dürer1

       The Renaissance in the north has a distinctively different character than that of Italy and the southern countries. Though the styles of Northern artists vary according to geography, one characteristic that is fundamental to all northern art of this period is a fondness for meticulous rendering of details. In addition, there is generally less of the classical ideal apparent in the figures (which can be partly explained by their lack of access to Greek and Roman statues). Instead, remnants of Gothic influences are apparent in their compositions.

  1. Hans Memling (1430-1494)

    Hans Memling was probably born around the year 1430. Memling probably served his apprenticeship at Mainz or Cologne, and later worked under Rogier van der Weyden. He did not come to Bruges until about 1467, and certainly not as a wounded fugitive from the field of Nancy. The story is fiction, as is also the report that he was sheltered and cured by the Hospitallers at Bruges, and, to show his gratitude, refused payment for a picture he had painted. Memling did indeed paint for the Hospitallers, but he painted not one but many pictures, and he did so in 1479 and 1480, being probably known to his patrons of St John by many masterpieces even before the battle of Nancy.
    Links: Top Ten Paintings by Hans Memling, http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Hans_Memling/,
  2. Albrecht Altdorfer (1480-1538)

    Albrecht Altdorfer (c. 1480 near Regensburg – February 12, 1538 in Regensburg) was a painter, the leader of the Danubian School in southern Germany, and a contemporary of Albrecht Dürer. Little is known about the life of this German painter. It is however assumed that he was an apprentice at an ateliet of miniaturists, because his early works resemble these techniques. Two of his biggest influences were Lucas Cranach the Elder and Max Reichlich.
    Links: Top Ten Paintings by Albrecht Altdorfer, http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Albrecht_Altdorfer/,
  3. Hieronymus Bosch (1453-1516)
    Hieronymus BoschHieronymus BoschHieronymus Bosch3
           Hieronymus Bosch, also Jeroen Bosch, (1453 – 1516) was a prolific Dutch painter of the 15th and 16th century. Many of his works depict sin and human moral failings; they contain complex, highly original, imaginative, and dense use of symbolic figures and iconography, some of which was obscure even in his own time. He is said to have been an inspiration to the surrealism movement in the 20th century. His true name was Hieronymus (or Jeroen) van Aken. He signed some of his paintings with Bosch (pronounced as Boss in Dutch), derived from his birthplace ‘s-Hertogenbosch. In Spanish he is often called El Bosco.
    Links: Top Ten Paintings Hieronymus Bosch,
  4. Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1525-1569)

    Pieter Brueghel the Elder was born around 1525 (the exact date is unknown) in the Latin Breda. However there is a bit of confusion about this place, because the Latin Breda could stand for the town Breda in Holland or for the Belgian town Bree. However Brueghel is certainly considered to be Belgian. Brueghel’s early influences include his teacher Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Hieronymus Bosch. Pieter Brueghel later married the daughter of his teacher, Mayke. In 1551 Brueghel was accepted as a master in the painters guild of Antwerp and only shortly after, he started travelling. Pieter Brueghel the Elder travelled to France and Italy, to finally settle in Brussels. Brueghel often disguised himself as a peasant to acquire inspiration for his paintings. This led to his nickname “Peasant Brueghel”. Brueghel often painted rural scenes, but is also known for painting wonderful landscapes. Brueghel was one of the first painters who painted landscapes for their own sake, rather than as a backdrop to a religious allegory. During the last years of his life Bruegel was much influenced by Italian Renaissance art with its inclination towards the monumental. This can be seen in such works as The Peasant Wedding, The Peasant Dance and The Peasant and the Birdnester, where the figures are larger in scale, more in the foreground, with a lower viewpoint and less emphasis on the setting. However he still continued to produce works in his earlier style with small figures in panoramic settings and his only real relationship with the Italian style in any of his paintings is in the simplicity of form rather than in the idealization of character. Pieter Brueghel the Elder died September 9, 1569, in Brussels.
    Links: Top Ten Paintings by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, Top Ten Paintings by Pieter Brueghel the Younger, http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Pieter_Brueghel_the_Elder/,
  5. Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528)
    Albrecht Dürer1
           Albrecht Dürer (May 21, 1471 – April 6, 1528) was a German painter, wood carver and engraver. He is best known for his woodcuts in series, including the Apocalypse (1498), two series on the crucifixion of Christ, the Great Passion (1498-1510) and the Little Passion (1510-11) as well as many of his individual prints, such as Knight, Death, and the Devil (1513) and Melancholia I (1514). He was born in Nuremberg. His family came from Hungary, germanizing the family name of Thürer when they settled in Nuremberg soon after the middle of the 15th century. His father, also called Albrecht, was a goldsmith and served as assistant to Hieronymus Helfer, and in 1468 married his daughter Barbara. They had eighteen children, of whom Albrecht was the second. Albrecht’s brother, Hans Dürer, became a famous artist as well. At the age of fifteen Dürer was apprenticed to the principal painter of the town, Michael Wolgemut, a prolific if undistinguished producer of small works in the late Gothic style. Dürer learned not only painting but also wood carving and elementary copper engraving under Wolgemut. At the end of his apprenticeship in 1490 he travelled (Wanderjahre). In 1492 he arrived in Colmar, intending to study under Martin Schöngauer, a well regarded painter-engraver of his time. He found that Schongauer had died the previous year, but he was received kindly by the family of the deceased master there and in Basel. Under them he evidently had some practice both in metal-engraving and in furnishing designs for the woodcutter. He left Basel some time in 1494 and travelled briefly in the Low Countries before he returned to Nuremberg. From this period, little of the work that can be attributed to him with certainty survives.
    Links: Top Ten Paintings by Albrecht Dürer, Top Ten Drawings by Albrecht Dürer, http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Albrecht_Durer/,
  6. Pieter Brueghel the Younger (1564-1638)

           Pieter Brueghel the Younger was born as the son of Pieter Brueghel the Elder in the year 1564 in Belgium. When he was only five years old, his father died. Pieter Brueghel the Younger received his artistic training from Flemish landscape painter Gilles van Coninxloo. Brueghel later even married the sister of his master. Pieter Brueghel the Younger became a master in 1585. He then started painting landscapes, religious subjects and fantasy paintings. For this last category he often made use of fire and grotesque figures, leading to his nickname “Hell Brueghel.” Apart from these own inspired paintings, Pieter Brueghel the Younger also copied the works his father created, thus often leading to confusion which of the two actually painted the painting. Pieter Brueghel the Younger died in the year 1638.
    Links: Top Ten Paintings by Pieter Brueghel the Younger, Top Ten Paintings by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Pieter_Brueghel_the_Younger/,
  7. Quentin Massys (1466-1530)
    Quentin Massys
           Quentin Matsys, his first name also recorded as Quinten or Kwinten and his last name as Massys or Metsys (1466 – 1530), was a painter in the Flemish tradition and a founder of the Antwerp school. He was born at Leuven, where he was trained as an ironsmith. Near the front of the Cathedral of Our Lady in Antwerp is a wrought-iron well, known as the “Matsys Well,” which according to tradition was made by the painter-to-be. During the greater part of the 15th century, the centres in which the painters of the Low Countries most congregated were Bruges, Ghent and Brussels. Leuven gained prominence toward the close of this period, employing workmen from all of the crafts. Not until the beginning of the 16th century did Antwerp take the lead which it afterward maintained against Bruges, Ghent, Brussels, Mechelen and Leuven. Matsys, as a member of the Antwerp guild, was one of its first notable artists.
    Links: Top Ten Paintings by Quentin Massys,
  8. Jan van Eyck (1385-1441)

           Jan van Eyck (1385 – 1441) was a 15th century Flemish painter and one of the first to popularize oil paint. Jan belonged to the Van Eyck family of painters and was a younger brother of Hubert van Eyck.
    Links: Top Ten Paintings by Jan van Eyck, http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Jan_van_Eyck/,
  9. Links: Paintings, Top 100 Paintings, Top 100 Painters, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintings, Top Ten Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Renaissance Paintingshttp://www.artinthepicture.com/styles/Northern-Renaissance/,

Top Ten Paintings by Jan van Eyck

Top Ten Paintings by Jan van Eyck

       Jan van Eyck (1385 – 1441) was a 15th century Flemish painter and one of the first to popularize oil paint. Jan belonged to the Van Eyck family of painters and was a younger brother of Hubert van Eyck.

  1. The Last Judgment (1430)

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  2. The Crucifixion (1430)

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  3. The Virgin of Chancellor Rolin (1435)

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  4. The Arnolfini Wedding (1434)

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  5. Adoration of the Lamb (1432)

    Like the 17th-century Dutch painter Vermeer, van Eyck takes us into the light, and makes us feel that we, too, belong there. Van Eyck’s meticulously detailed Adoration of the Lamb is part of a huge altarpiece; painted on both sites, it is the largest and most complex altarpiece produced in the Netherlands in the 15th century. This monumental work still hangs in its original setting, the Cathedral of St Bavo in Ghent, drawing the worshipper deeper and deeper into the sacred world it makes visible. There has been much debate over the parts the two van Eyck brothers, Jan and Hubert, played in the creation of the Ghent Altarpiece: whether Jan, about whom we have the most information, was mostly responsible, or whether it was Hubert, about whom we know almost nothing. For what it is worth, Hubert is given precedence in the inscription. It reads: “The painter Hubrecht Eyck, than whom none was greater, began this work, which his brother Jan, who was second to him in art, completed at the behest of Jodoc Vijdt…”
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  6. St. Barbara (1437)

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  7. Man in a Turban (1433)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  8. Portrait of Christ (1440)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  9. Madonna by the Fountain (1439)

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  10. Margaret van Eyck (1439)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  11. Cardinal Niccolo Albergati (1438)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  12. Links: Paintings, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintings, Top Ten Renaissance Paintners, Top Ten Renaissance Paintings, http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Jan_van_Eyck/,

Top Ten Paintings by Quentin Massys

Top Ten Paintings by Quentin Massys

Quentin Massys

       Quentin Matsys, his first name also recorded as Quinten or Kwinten and his last name as Massys or Metsys (1466 – 1530), was a painter in the Flemish tradition and a founder of the Antwerp school. He was born at Leuven, where he was trained as an ironsmith. Near the front of the Cathedral of Our Lady in Antwerp is a wrought-iron well, known as the “Matsys Well,” which according to tradition was made by the painter-to-be. During the greater part of the 15th century, the centres in which the painters of the Low Countries most congregated were Bruges, Ghent and Brussels. Leuven gained prominence toward the close of this period, employing workmen from all of the crafts. Not until the beginning of the 16th century did Antwerp take the lead which it afterward maintained against Bruges, Ghent, Brussels, Mechelen and Leuven. Matsys, as a member of the Antwerp guild, was one of its first notable artists.

  1. The Ugly Duchess (1530)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  2. David and Bathsheba (1562)

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  3. The Virgin Enthroned (1525)

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  4. Ecce Homo (1515)

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  5. Ill-Matched Lovers (1525)

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  6. Portrait of Erasmus of Rotterdam (1517)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  7. Portrait of a Canon (1515)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  8. Portrait of a Man (1515)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  9. Portrait of an Old Man (1517)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  10. Money Changers (1514)

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  11. The Adoration of the Magi (1526)

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  12. The Virgin and Child (1529)

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  13. Madonna and Child (1525)

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  14. The Crucifixion (1520)

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  15. The Lamentation (1511)

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  16. Mary Magdalene

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  17. St. John Altarpiece (1508)

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  18. Links: Paintings, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintings, Top Ten Renaissance e Painters, Top Ten Renaissance Paintings, http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Quentin_Massys/,

Top Ten Paintings by Pieter Brueghel the Younger

Top Ten Paintings by Pieter Brueghel the Younger

       Pieter Brueghel the Younger was born as the son of Pieter Brueghel the Elder in the year 1564 in Belgium. When he was only five years old, his father died. Pieter Brueghel the Younger received his artistic training from Flemish landscape painter Gilles van Coninxloo. Brueghel later even married the sister of his master. Pieter Brueghel the Younger became a master in 1585. He then started painting landscapes, religious subjects and fantasy paintings. For this last category he often made use of fire and grotesque figures, leading to his nickname “Hell Brueghel.” Apart from these own inspired paintings, Pieter Brueghel the Younger also copied the works his father created, thus often leading to confusion which of the two actually painted the painting. Pieter Brueghel the Younger died in the year 1638.

  1. The Triumph of Death (Repainted Original)

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  2. Crucifixion (1617)

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  3. Calvary (1615)

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  4. Village Lawyer (1621)

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  5. The Massacre of the Innocents (1625)

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  6. Proverbs (1607)

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  7. The Kermesse of St. George (1628)

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  8. Preparation of the Flower Beds (1625)

    Links: Top 100 Flowers, Top Ten Gardens, Top Ten Superfoods,
  9. Winter Landscape with a Bird-trap

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  10. Adoration of the Magi (1625)

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  11. Links: Paintings, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintings, Top Ten Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Renaissance Paintingshttp://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Pieter_Brueghel_the_Younger/,

Top Ten Paintings by Albrecht Dürer

Top Ten Paintings by Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer1

       Albrecht Dürer (May 21, 1471 – April 6, 1528) was a German painter, wood carver and engraver. He is best known for his woodcuts in series, including the Apocalypse (1498), two series on the crucifixion of Christ, the Great Passion (1498-1510) and the Little Passion (1510-11) as well as many of his individual prints, such as Knight, Death, and the Devil (1513) and Melancholia I (1514). He was born in Nuremberg. His family came from Hungary, germanizing the family name of Thürer when they settled in Nuremberg soon after the middle of the 15th century. His father, also called Albrecht, was a goldsmith and served as assistant to Hieronymus Helfer, and in 1468 married his daughter Barbara. They had eighteen children, of whom Albrecht was the second. Albrecht’s brother, Hans Dürer, became a famous artist as well. At the age of fifteen Dürer was apprenticed to the principal painter of the town, Michael Wolgemut, a prolific if undistinguished producer of small works in the late Gothic style. Dürer learned not only painting but also wood carving and elementary copper engraving under Wolgemut. At the end of his apprenticeship in 1490 he travelled (Wanderjahre). In 1492 he arrived in Colmar, intending to study under Martin Schöngauer, a well regarded painter-engraver of his time. He found that Schongauer had died the previous year, but he was received kindly by the family of the deceased master there and in Basel. Under them he evidently had some practice both in metal-engraving and in furnishing designs for the woodcutter. He left Basel some time in 1494 and travelled briefly in the Low Countries before he returned to Nuremberg. From this period, little of the work that can be attributed to him with certainty survives.

  1. Adam and Eve (1507)

    Links: Top Ten Paintings of Adam and Eve,
  2. Christ Among the Doctors (1506)

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  3. Altarpiece of the Rose Garlands (1506)

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  4. The Martyrdom of the Ten Thousand (1508)

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  5. Portrait of Durer’s Father at 70 (1497)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  6. Self-Portrait (1498)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  7. The Seven Sorrows of the Virgin (1497)

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  8. Virgin and Child (1495)

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  9. Portrait of Maximilian I (1519)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  10. Saint James the Apostle (1516)

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  11. Madonna of the Pear (1526)

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  12. Portrait of Johannes Kleberger

    Links: Top Ten Portrait Paintings,
  13. Pond in the Woods (1496)

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  14. Links: Top Ten Drawings by Albrecht Durer, Paintings, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintings, Top Ten Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintingshttp://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Albrecht_Durer/,

Top Ten Paintings by Pieter Brueghel the Elder

Top Ten Paintings by Pieter Brueghel the Elder

       Pieter Brueghel the Elder was born around 1525 (the exact date is unknown) in the Latin Breda. However there is a bit of confusion about this place, because the Latin Breda could stand for the town Breda in Holland or for the Belgian town Bree. However Brueghel is certainly considered to be Belgian. Brueghel’s early influences include his teacher Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Hieronymus Bosch. Pieter Brueghel later married the daughter of his teacher, Mayke. In 1551 Brueghel was accepted as a master in the painters guild of Antwerp and only shortly after, he started travelling. Pieter Brueghel the Elder travelled to France and Italy, to finally settle in Brussels. Brueghel often disguised himself as a peasant to acquire inspiration for his paintings. This led to his nickname “Peasant Brueghel”. Brueghel often painted rural scenes, but is also known for painting wonderful landscapes. Brueghel was one of the first painters who painted landscapes for their own sake, rather than as a backdrop to a religious allegory. During the last years of his life Bruegel was much influenced by Italian Renaissance art with its inclination towards the monumental. This can be seen in such works as The Peasant Wedding, The Peasant Dance and The Peasant and the Birdnester, where the figures are larger in scale, more in the foreground, with a lower viewpoint and less emphasis on the setting. However he still continued to produce works in his earlier style with small figures in panoramic settings and his only real relationship with the Italian style in any of his paintings is in the simplicity of form rather than in the idealization of character. Pieter Brueghel the Elder died September 9, 1569, in Brussels.

  1. The Tower of Babel (1563)

    Links: Top Ten Towers, 
  2. Landscape with the Fall of Icarus (1555)

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  3. The Fall of the Rebel Angels

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  4. De Dulle Griet (1562)

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  5. The Triumph of Death (1562)

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  6. The Procession to Calvary (1564)

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  7. Gloomy Day (1565)

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  8. Hunters in the Snow (1565)

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  9. The Peasant Wedding (1567)

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  10. The Numbering at Bethlehem (1566)

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  11. Children’s Games (1560)

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  12. The Bay of Naples (1556)

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  13. Storm at Sea (1569)

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  14. Links: Paintings, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintings, Top Ten Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Renaissance Paintingshttp://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Pieter_Brueghel_the_Elder/,

Top Ten Paintings by Albrecht Altdorfer

Top Ten Paintings by Albrecht Altdorfer

       Albrecht Altdorfer (c. 1480 near Regensburg – February 12, 1538 in Regensburg) was a painter, the leader of the Danubian School in southern Germany, and a contemporary of Albrecht Dürer. Little is known about the life of this German painter. It is however assumed that he was an apprentice at an ateliet of miniaturists, because his early works resemble these techniques. Two of his biggest influences were Lucas Cranach the Elder and Max Reichlich.

  1. The Danube Valley Near Regensburg (1510)

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  2. The Victory of Alexander the Great (1529)

    Links: Warfare, Top Ten Warriors, Top Ten Generals, Top Ten Military Strategists, Top Ten Historically Significant Wars, Top Ten Battles,
  3. The Birth of the Virgin (1525)

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  4. The Rest on the Flight to Egypt (1510)

    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Attractions,
  5. The Martyrdom of St. Florian (1515)

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  6. Loth and his Daughters (1537)

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  7. The Nativity (1513)

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  8. Allegory (1531)

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  9. The Departure of Saint Florian (1515)

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  10. Resurrection (1518)

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  11. Saint George in the Forest (1510)

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  12. Susanna in the Bath and the Stoning of the Elders (1526)

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  13. The Crucifixion (1526)

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  14. The Fall of Man (1535)

    Links: Top Ten Paintings of Adam and Eve,
  15. Entombment (1518)

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  16. Links: Paintings, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintingshttp://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Albrecht_Altdorfer/,

Top Ten Paintings by Hans Memling

Top Ten Paintings by Hans Memling

Hans Memling was probably born around the year 1430. Memling probably served his apprenticeship at Mainz or Cologne, and later worked under Rogier van der Weyden. He did not come to Bruges until about 1467, and certainly not as a wounded fugitive from the field of Nancy. The story is fiction, as is also the report that he was sheltered and cured by the Hospitallers at Bruges, and, to show his gratitude, refused payment for a picture he had painted. Memling did indeed paint for the Hospitallers, but he painted not one but many pictures, and he did so in 1479 and 1480, being probably known to his patrons of St John by many masterpieces even before the battle of Nancy.

  1. Hell (1485)

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  2. Vanity (1485)

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  3. The Last Judgment Triptych (1470)

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  4. Adam and Eve (1485)

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  5. The Last Judgement (1467-71)

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  6. Tommaso Portinari (1470)

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  7. Adoration of the Magi (1470)

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  8. Advent and Triumph of Christ (1480)

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  9. Scenes from the Passion of Christ (1470)

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  10. Virgin and Child Enthroned (1485)

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  11. Allegory with a Virgin (1479)

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  12. Flower Still-Life (1490)

    Links: Top 100 Flowers, Top 100 Symbols,
  13. Bathsheba (1482)

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  14. Christ Giving His Blessing

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  15. The Archangel Michael (1480)

    Links: Top Ten Angels,
  16. St. Ursula Shrine (1489)
    File:Hans Memling 072.jpg
    Links: Spiritual Teachers, Top Ten Saints, Top Ten Shrines,
  17. Links: Paintings, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintings, Top Ten Northern Renaissance Paintings, Top Ten Renaissance Painters, Top Ten Renaissance Paintingshttp://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Hans_Memling/,

Top Ten Paintings by Hieronymus Bosch

Top Ten Paintings by Hieronymus Bosch

       Hieronymus Bosch, also Jeroen Bosch, (1453 – 1516) was a prolific Dutch painter of the 15th and 16th century. Many of his works depict sin and human moral failings; they contain complex, highly original, imaginative, and dense use of symbolic figures and iconography, some of which was obscure even in his own time. He is said to have been an inspiration to the surrealism movement in the 20th century. His true name was Hieronymus (or Jeroen) van Aken. He signed some of his paintings with Bosch (pronounced as Boss in Dutch), derived from his birthplace ‘s-Hertogenbosch. In Spanish he is often called El Bosco.

  1. The Garden of Earthly Delights (1510)

    The central panel to us has an air of innocence, the gentle lovemaking, naked young people creating a mood of joy. To Bosch, with his medieval mind, this world was brimming with symbols of sin. A few examples of this are the water birds, fish, and ripe strawberries that signify lewdness and lust. The left panel represents evil invading the world. The creation of man; Adam and Eve are represented here. In the right wing we are shown a vision of hell. The flames, demons, and complete horror invade this space giving tangible shape to the fears that haunted humankind throughout the Middle Ages.
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  2. Ascent of the Blessed

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  3. Hell

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  4. The Last Judgement

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  5. The Last Judgement Triptych (1505)
    The Last Judgement Triptych
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  6. Paradise and Hell

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  7. The Temptation of St. Anthony (1500)
    The Temptation of St. AnthonyThe Temptation of St. Anthony1The Temptation of St. Anthony2
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  8. The Haywain Triptych (1490)
    The Haywain TriptychThe Haywain Triptych1The Haywain Triptych2
    Central panel of the Haywain Tryptich The central panel contains a large wagon load of hay, which the greedy people grasp. Meanwhile, the wagon is being pulled by demons into the right panel, one of Bosch’s earliest depictions of hell.
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  9. St. John in the Wilderness (1505)

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  10. Antoniusstr: Versuchung des Hl. Antonius

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  11. Adoration of the Magi (1480)

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  12. Death Of The Reprobate

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  13. The Seven Deadly Sins (1480)

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  14. Christ Carrying Cross (Ghent Version) (1480)
    Christ Carrying Cross
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  15. Ecce Homo
    Ecce Homo
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  16. Christ Crowned With Thorns (1495-1500)
    Christ Crowned With Thorns
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  17. Creation of the World (1510)
    Creation of the World
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  18. The Extraction of the Stone of Madness (1480)

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  19. Head Of A Halberdier
    Head Of A Halberdier
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  20. The Temptation Of St. Anthony

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  21. St. John Pathmos (1485)
    St. John Pathmos
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  22. St. Jerome In Prayer (1505)

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  23. Death and the Miser

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  24. The Hermit
    The Hermit
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  25. Links: Paintings, Top 100 Paintings, Top 100 Paintings, Top Ten Symbolist Painters, Top Ten Symbolist PaintingsTop 100 Dutch Paintings, Top Ten Dutch Paintershttp://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Hieronymus_Bosch/,