Top Ten Paintings by Carl Larsson

Top Ten Paintings by Carl Larsson

Carl LarssonSelf Portrait

        Carl Larsson was born May 28, 1853 in Prästgatan No.78, a house on the Tyska Stallplan in Gamla stan, the old town in Stockholm. His parents were extremely poor and his childhood was not happy. Renate Puvogel, in her book Larsson, gives plenty of information about his life: “His mother was thrown out of the house, together with Carl and his brother Johan; after enduring a series of temporary dwellings, the family moved into Grev Magnigränd No.7 (later No.5) in what was then Ladugårdsplan, present-day Östermalm. As a rule, each room was home to three families; penury, filth and vice thrived there, leisurely seethed and smoldered  eaten-away and rotten bodies and souls. Such an environment is the natural breeding ground for cholera,” he wrote in his autobiographical novel Me (Jag, Stockholm, 1931, p.21). Carl’s father was also a good-for-nothing who worked as a casual laborer, sailed as a stoker on a ship headed for Scandinavia, and lost the lease to a nearby mill, only to end up there later as a mere grain carrier. Larsson portrays him as a loveless man lacking self-control; he drank, ranted and raved, and incurred lifelong anger of his son through his outburst “I curse the day you were born.” In contrast, Carl’s endlessly working mother provided for their everyday needs through her job as a laundress. Carl’s artistic talent was probably inherited from his grandfather on his mother’s side, who was a painter by trade. However, at the age of thirteen, his teacher Jacobsen, at the school for poor children urged him to apply to the “principskola” of the Royal Swedish Academy of Arts, and he was admitted. During his first years there, Larsson felt socially inferior, confused, and shy. In 1869, at the age of sixteen, he was promoted to the “antique school” of the same academy. There Larsson gained confidence, and even became a central figure in student life. Carl earned his first medal in nude drawing. During the mean time, Larsson worked as a caricaturist for the humorous paper Kasper and as graphic artist for the newspaper Ny Illustrerad Tidning. His annual wages were sufficient to allow him to help his parents out financially.

  1. A Lady Reading a Newspaper (1886)

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  2. The Old Man and the New Trees (1883)

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  3. October (1883)

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  4. Karin in Grez, Autumn

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  5. Brita at the Piano (1908)

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  6. The Still Life Painter (1886)

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  7. Model Writing Postcards (1906)

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  8. Lisbeth at the Birch (1910)

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  9. Self Portrait

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  10. Woman Lying on a Bench (1913)

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  11. On the Grass

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  12. The Bridge (1912)

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  13. Breakfast in the Open

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  14. Playing Scales

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  15. Christmas Morning (1894)

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  16. Crayfishing (1897)

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  17. Sunflowers

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  18. Getting Ready for a Game of Cards (1901)

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  19. Breakfast Under the Big Birch (1896)

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  20. The Apple Harvest (1904)

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  21. Brita and I (1895)

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  22. Brita’s Cactus (1904)

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  23. Lisbeth Fishing (1898)

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  24. Summer Morning (1908)

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  25. Nameday at the Storage House (1898)

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  26. Mamma’s and the Small Girls’ Room (1897)

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  27. Evening Meal (1905)

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  28. Under the Chestnut Tree (1912)

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  29. Brita as Iduna
    Brita as Iduna
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  30. Links: Paintings, Top Ten Realist Painters, Top Ten Realist Paintingshttp://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Carl_Larsson/,