Top 100 African Sculptures

Top 100 African Sculptures

4

  1. The Sphinx

    The Great Sphinx of Giza is the most famous statue in Africa and is an icon of Egyptian culture and a testament to their achievements. It resides on the Giza Plateau on the west bank of the Nile River and faces east. It dates to the fourth dynasty of ancient Egypt, although the exact date of its construction is uncertain. The head of the Great Sphinx is now believed to be that of the pharaoh Khafra.
    Links: Top Ten Sphinx Sculptures, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphinx,
  2. Colossal Enthroned Ramses II

    (The Great), facade of rock-cut Temple of Amun, Abu Simbel (in ancient Nubia), Egypt, rock, figure height: 67′, (Dynasty XIX, New Kingdom), c.1,279-1,212 B.C
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Attractions,
  3. Colossus Statue of Ramesses II, Luxor, Egypt

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Attractions, Top Ten Pharaohs,
  4. Guinea Half Portrait of a Lady

    This mysterious 150 m tall granite cliff sculpture of a lady was found in Eastern Africa in the country of Guinea.
    Links: Top Ten Guinean Attractions,
  5. Statue of Ramesses II

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Egyptian Sculptures, Top Ten Statues,
  6. King Tutankhamen Statues

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Egyptian Sculptures,
  7. Colossal Statue of Merneptah

    Description:
    Links:
  8. Bust of Nefertiti
    234
    Description:
    Links: Top 100 Busts, Top Ten Queens,
  9. Guanches, Canary Islands
    g2g5g6g1g4g7g3
    Guanches is the name given to the aboriginal Berber inhabitants of the Canary Islands. It is believed that they migrated to the archipelago around 1000 BC or perhaps earlier, with some speculating that they may have been descendents of the legendary territory of Atlantis. While it is generally considered that the Guanches no longer exist as a distinct ethnicity, traces of their culture can still be found intermixed within Canarian customs and traditions, such as Silbo, the whistled language of La Gomera Island.
    Links: Top Ten Canary Island Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guanches,
  10. Ptah Statues

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Gods,
  11. Amenhotep III and Sobek

    Amenhotep III and Sobek, from Dahamsha, now in the Luxor Museum
    Links:
  12. Statue of Ramesses II

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs,
  13. The Colossi of Memnon, Egypt

    The Colossi of Memnon, known to locals as el-Colossat, or es-Salamat, are two massive stone statues of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. For the past 3,400 years (since 1350 BC) they have stood in the Theban necropolis, across the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor.
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Attractions, Relieves and Petroglyphs, Top Ten African Relieves, Top Ten Egyptian Relieves, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colossi_of_Memnon,
  14. Sallah Ad Din (Saladin)

           Ṣalāḥ ad-Dīn Yūsuf ibn Ayyūb (1138 – March 4, 1193), better known in the Western world as Saladin, was a Kurdish Muslim, who became the first Sultan of Egypt and Syria, and founded the Ayyubid dynasty. He led Muslim and Arab opposition to the Franks and other European Crusaders in the Levant. At the height of his power, his sultanate included Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia, Kurdistan, Hejaz and Yemen. Under his personal leadership, his forces defeated the Crusaders at the Battle of Hattin, leading the way to his re-capture of Palestine, which had been seized from the Fatimid Egyptians by the Crusaders 88 years earlier. Though the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem would continue to exist for a period, its defeat at Hattin marked a turning point in its conflict with the Muslims and Arabs. As such, Saladin is a prominent figure in Kurdish, Arab and Muslim culture. Saladin was a strict adherent of Sunni Islam. His chivalrous behavior was noted by Christian chroniclers, especially in the accounts of the Siege of Kerak, and despite being the nemesis of the Crusaders, he won the respect of many of them, including Richard the Lionheart; rather than becoming a hated figure in Europe, he became a celebrated example of the principles of chivalry.
    Links: Top Ten Warriors, Top Ten Battles, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saladin,
  15. Amenhotep II

    Amenhotep II (sometimes read as Amenophis II and meaning Amun is Satisfied) was the 7th Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. Amenhotep inherited a vast kingdom from his father Thutmose III, and held it by means of a few military campaigns in Syria; however, he fought much less than his father, and his reign saw the effective cessation of hostilities between Egypt and Mitanni, the major kingdoms vying for power in Syria. His reign is usually dated from 1427 to 1401 BC.
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amenhotep_II,
  16. Sphinx

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Sphinx Sculptures,
  17. Cleopatra

    Cleopatra VII Philopator (69 BC – August 12, 30 BC) was the last pharaoh of Ancient Egypt. She was a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty, a family of Greek origin that ruled Egypt after Alexander the Great’s death during the Hellenistic period. The Ptolemies, throughout their dynasty, spoke Greek and refused to speak Egyptian, which is the reason that Greek as well as Egyptian languages were used on official court documents such as the Rosetta Stone. By contrast, Cleopatra did learn to speak Egyptian and represented herself as the reincarnation of an Egyptian goddess, Isis. Cleopatra originally ruled jointly with her father Ptolemy XII Auletes and later with her brothers, Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV, whom she married as per Egyptian custom, but eventually she became sole ruler. As pharaoh, she consummated a liaison with Julius Caesar that solidified her grip on the throne. She later elevated her son with Caesar, Caesarion, to co-ruler in name. After Caesar’s assassination in 44 BC, she aligned with Mark Antony in opposition to Caesar’s legal heir, Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (later known as Augustus). With Antony, she bore the twins Cleopatra Selene II and Alexander Helios, and another son, Ptolemy Philadelphus. Her unions with her brothers produced no children. After losing the Battle of Actium to Octavian’s forces, Antony committed suicide. Cleopatra followed suit, according to tradition killing herself by means of an asp bite on August 12, 30 BC. She was briefly outlived by Caesarion, who was declared pharaoh by his supporters, but he was soon killed on Octavian’s orders. Egypt became the Roman province of Aegyptus. To this day, Cleopatra remains a popular figure in Western culture. Her legacy survives in numerous works of art and the many dramatizations of her story in literature and other media, including William Shakespeare’s tragedy Antony and Cleopatra, Jules Massenet’s opera Cléopâtre and the 1963 film Cleopatra. In most depictions, Cleopatra is put forward as a great beauty, and her successive conquests of the world’s most powerful men are taken as proof of her aesthetic and sexual appeal. In his Pensées, philosopher Blaise Pascal contends, evidently speaking ironically because a large nose has symbolized dominance in different periods of history, that Cleopatra’s classically beautiful profile changed world history: “Cleopatra’s nose, had it been shorter, the whole face of the world would have been changed.”
    Links: Top Ten Queens, Top Ten Pharaohs, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleopatra_VII,
  18. Statue of a Pharaoh

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs,
  19. Trinity of King Menkaure with Goddess Hathor and the Goddess Diospolis Parva (2,680-2,565 BC)

    This statue depicts the trinity of King Menkaure (Mycerinus) with the Goddess Hathor (left), and the goddess of the nome of Diospolis Parva (right). This 4th dynasty statue is carved in green slate and stands 37.25”. It currently resides in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Gods,
  20. Colossal Statue of Amenhotep III

    Amenhotep III (sometimes read as Amenophis III; Egyptian Amāna-Ḥātpa; meaning Amun is Satisfied) also known as Amenhotep the Magnificent was the 9th pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. According to different authors, he ruled Egypt from June 1386 to 1349 BC or June 1388 BC to December 1351 BC/1350 BC after his father Thutmose IV died. Amenhotep III was the son of Thutmose by Mutemwiya, a minor wife of Amenhotep’s father. His reign was a period of unprecedented prosperity and artistic splendor, when Egypt reached the peak of her artistic and international power. When he died (probably in the 39th year of his reign), his son initially ruled as Amenhotep IV, but later changed his own royal name to Akhenaten.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amenhotep_III,
  21. African Renaissance Monument

    The African Renaissance Monument is a 49m tall bronze statue located on top one of the twin hills known as Collines des Mamelles, outside of Dakar, Senegal. Built overlooking the Atlantic Ocean in the Ouakam suburb, the statue was designed by the Senegalese architect Pierre Goudiaby after an idea presented by president Abdoulaye Wade and built by a company from North Korea. Site preparation on top of the 100-meter high hill began in 2006 and construction of the bronze statue began April 3, 2008. Originally scheduled for completion in December 2009, delays stretched into early 2010, and the formal dedication occurred on 4 April 2010, Senegal’s “National Day,” commemorating the 50th anniversary of the country’s independence from France. It is the tallest statue in the world outside Asia and the former Soviet Union.
    Links: Top Ten African Monuments, Top Ten Architectural Works by Pierre Goudiaby, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Renaissance_Monument,
  22. Slave Market Statue, Stone Town, Tanzania

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Tanzanian Attractions,
  23. Canary Islands Face by Igor Mitoraj

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Sculptures by Igor Mitoraj, Top 100 Busts,
  24. Saladin, Cairo, Egypt

    Ṣalāḥ ad-Dīn Yūsuf ibn Ayyūb (1138 – March 4, 1193), better known in the Western world as Saladin, was a Kurdish Muslim, who became the first Sultan of Egypt and Syria, and founded the Ayyubid dynasty. He led Muslim and Arab opposition to the Franks and other European Crusaders in the Levant. At the height of his power, his sultanate included Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia, Kurdistan, Hejaz and Yemen. Under his personal leadership, his forces defeated the Crusaders at the Battle of Hattin, leading the way to his re-capture of Palestine, which had been seized from the Fatimid Egyptians by the Crusaders 88 years earlier. Though the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem would continue to exist for a period, its defeat at Hattin marked a turning point in its conflict with the Muslims and Arabs. As such, Saladin is a prominent figure in Kurdish, Arab and Muslim culture. Saladin was a strict adherent of Sunni Islam. His chivalrous behavior was noted by Christian chroniclers, especially in the accounts of the Siege of Kerak, and despite being the nemesis of the Crusaders, he won the respect of many of them, including Richard the Lionheart; rather than becoming a hated figure in Europe, he became a celebrated example of the principles of chivalry.
    Links: Top Ten Warriors, Top Ten Egyptian Statues, Top Ten Egyptian Attractions,
  25. Thutmose III

    Thutmose III (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis III, and meaning Thoth is born) was the 6th Pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty. During the first 22 years of Thutmose’s reign he was co-regent with his stepmother, Hatshepsut, who was named the pharaoh. While he is shown first on surviving monuments, both were assigned the usual royal names and insignia and neither is given any obvious seniority over the other. He served as the head of her armies. After her death and his later rise to being the pharaoh of the kingdom, he created the largest empire Egypt had ever seen; no fewer than 17 campaigns were conducted, and he conquered from Niya in North Syria to the 4th waterfall of the Nile in Nubia. Officially, Thutmose III ruled Egypt for almost 54 years, and his reign is usually dated from April 24, 1479 BC to March 11, 1425 BC; however, this includes the 22 years he was co-regent to Hatshepsut, his stepmother and aunt. During the final two years of his reign, he appointed his son-and successor-Amenhotep II, as his junior co-regent. When Thutmose III died, he was buried in the Valley of the Kings as were the rest of the kings from this period in Egypt.
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Queens, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thutmose_III,
  26. Natakamani Statue, Sudan

    Natakamani was a King of Kush who reigned from around or earlier than 1 BC to around 20 AD. Natakamani is the best attested ruler of the Meroitic period. He was born to queen Amanishakheto. Natakamani is known from several temple buildings and from his pyramid in Meroe. He is also known for restoring the temple of Amun, as well as his dedication of the temple at Faras. On several monuments he appears together with co-regent Queen Amanitore. The relationship between the two is not clear: she might have been his wife, or his mother who served as his regent while he was still young. However, it is known that during the co-reign, they had almost equal rights as depicted in several temple sculptures. At the temple of Apademek there is a relief showing him with his successor Arikhankharer. Natakamani was preceded by Amanishakheto and succeeded by queen Amanitore.
    Links: Top Ten Sudanese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natakamani,
  27. Statue of Memi and Sabu (2575–2465 BC)

    Pair statues, usually depicting a husband and wife, were frequently placed in a serdab, the hidden statue chamber often found in non-royal tomb chapels of the Old Kingdom. The Egyptians believed that the spirit of the deceased could use such a statue as a home and enter it in order to benefit from gifts of food that were brought to the offering chapel of the tomb. The inscription on the front of this statue identifies these individuals as the Royal Acquaintance Memi and Sabu. Although the text does not specify a relationship, they were probably husband and wife, as is common for pair statues where a relationship is recorded. The pose is unusual because Memi is returning Sabu’s embrace by draping his arm around her shoulders. This restricting gesture may account for the fact that he stands with his feet together, rather than striding forward in the normal masculine pose. Until recently, this statue was dated to Dynasty 5, but the figures have many features in common with Fourth Dynasty statues found in the non-royal cemeteries surrounding the Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops) at Giza. In addition, the pose has only two known parallels, both from Giza and both datable to Dynasty 4.
    Links: https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/ho/02/afe/ho_48.111.htm,
  28. Rahotep and Nofret

    These statues of Rahotep and his wife Nofret date from the Old Kingdom and contain some of the oldest texts on this website. They were discovered in 1871 at Meidum near the pyramid of the 4th Dynasty King Sneferu (ca. 2625 – 2585 BCE). It is possible that Rahotep was Sneferu’s son. The statues are made of painted limestone, about 122 cm high, which makes the images of Rahotep and Nofret basically life-sized. The paint is amazingly fresh and bright. The eyes of the statues are made of inlaid crystal, which frightened the first workers to open the tomb. Rahotep’s neat moustache and close-cropped hair give him a very modern look. This style of adornment apparently did not survive into later ages. Nofret wears a wig, and if you look closely at her hairline, you can see her natural hair peeking out from under it. There are six lines of text around Rahotep’s statue, arranged in three columns on each side. The text is read from top to bottom, right to left. The last column in each group is the same, so I have written it only once. Beginning with the text on the left side of the statue (over Rahotep’s right shoulder), the hieroglyphs read Great One of Buto, Overseer of Transporters, Overseer of the Army, Controller of Archers, King’s Son of his own body, Rahotep. The text on the right reads Great One of the Seers of Heliopolis Unique One of the Great Ones of the Hall Hewer of the Ames mace Eldest2 of the Palace1 Unique One of the Great Ones at the Place of the Beer Measurers.
    Links:
  29. Colossal Statue of Mentuhotep II (2051–2000 BC)

           Mentuhotep II Nebhepetre was the fifth king of Dynasty 11. Ruling from Thebes and building on the efforts of his predecessors, he succeeded in reuniting Egypt under one king. In place of the large courtyard tombs of his ancestors, he built a combination mortuary temple and tomb on a large platform against the cliffs in Deir el-Bahri at Thebes.
    Links: https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/kqae/ho_26.3.29.htm,
  30. Standing Figure from Saqqara (2,498-2,345 BC)

    This standing statue from Saqqara, now residing in the Cairo Museum, is made out of stone and dates back to the 5th dynasty.
    Links:
  31. Kneeling Figure of Sobekhotep V

    Description:
    Links:
  32. Statue of Pharaoh Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II of the 11th Dynasty

    Description:
    Links: http://wayzom.com/2009/12/10/middle-kingdom-pharaohs/,
  33. Shaka Zulu, Glencoe, South Africa

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten South African Attractions,
  34. Block Statue of Senemut and Princess Neferure

    Description:
    Links:
  35. Sehkmet Statues

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Gods,
  36. Late Period Egyptian Official

    Description:
    Links:
  37. Amenhotep (Huy)

    Amenhotep (Huy) was the high steward of Memphis under Amenhotep III in the Egyptian 18th Dynasty. With this title he was one of the highest officials at the royal court. Amenhotep, with the nickname Huy, was a member of an influential family. His father Heby was mayor of Memphis. His brother Ramose was vizier under Amenhotep III. His son Ipy was high steward under Akhenaten. The family member’s accomplishments are one of the rare cases where an influential family kept its high position under the latter king. Amenhotep is known from a high number of monuments. In Memphis, there was found a statue reporting his building work for his king. Another fine statue was found at Abydos. Already in the early 19th century, there was found in Saqqara his looted tomb. It contained a sarcophagus, a granite canopic chest, model scribal boards and a stele with a long religious text.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amenhotep_(Huy),
  38. Queen Hapshepshut

    Hatshepsut (also Hatchepsut; meaning Foremost of Noble Ladies; 1508–1458 BC) was the 5th pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Ancient Egypt. She is generally regarded by Egyptologists as one of the most successful pharaohs, reigning longer than any other woman of an indigenous Egyptian dynasty. Although contemporary records of her reign are documented in diverse ancient sources, Hatshepsut was described by early modern scholars as only having served as a co-regent from approximately 1479 to 1458 BC, during years seven to twenty-one of the reign previously identified as that of Thutmose III. Today Egyptologists generally agree that Hatshepsut assumed the position of pharaoh and the length of her reign usually is given as 22 years, since she was assigned a reign of twenty-one years and nine months by the 3rd century BC historian, Manetho, who had access to many historical records that now are lost. Her death is known to have occurred in 1458 BC, which implies that she became pharaoh circa 1479 BC.
    Links: Top Ten Queens, Top Ten Pharaohs, Top 100 Busts, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatshepsut,
  39. Bust of Sesostris I

    Description:
    Links: Top 100 Busts,
  40. Egypt’s Renaissance by Mahmoud Mokhtar 1919–1928

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Sculptures by Mahmoud Mokhtar,
  41. Mother and Child Sculpture (Ntadi) (19th Century)

    African,Democratic Republic of the Congo (Kongo peoples), 19th century or earlier, 35.56 cm (14 in.), Steatite, Classification: Sculpture On view in the: RichardB.Carter Gallery (African Art) In the fifteenth century a powerful kingdom grew up among the Kongo peoples. Prestige objects and emblems affirmed the wealth and status of the king and his court, including carved funerary sculptures that were placed on graves as memorials. Intended as conceptual likenesses, ntadi exude the composure appropriate to a person of importance. This example portrays a mother nursing a child. Her headdress incorporates four leopard claws, a reference to the king of the forest and a symbol of royal authority. Stone figure of a mother seated cross-legged nursing an infant. She wears a cap with jagged decoration.Museum ofFine Arts,Boston
    Links:
  42. Statue Depicting Queen Shanakdakhete of Meroe

           Statue of Queen Shanakdakhete (170-150 BCE) ruling queen of Kush, and a male member of her family giving her royal power. Her name is carved in a ruined temple where the earliest inscriptions in Meroitic hieroglyphic writing are found. Her pyramid at Meroe is one of the largest ever built for a Kushite ruler. It has a unique chapel with two rooms and two pylons. The chapel is among the most elaborately carved of any known. The scenes in the chapel show military campaigns to the south and the capture of numerous cattle and prisoners.
    Links: http://wysinger.homestead.com/shanadakhete.html,
  43. Nubian Statues

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Egyptian Statues,

  44. Description:
    Links:
  45. African Sculpture

    Description:
    Links:
  46. First Ataoja

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Nigerian Attractions,
  47. Statue, Porto Novo, Benin

    Description:
    Links:
  48. Loropéni Statue

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Burkina Faso Attractions,
  49. Lomé Independence Monument

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Togo Attractions,
  50. Lebna Dengal Statue, Somalia

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Somalian Attractions,
  51. River Gambia Statue

    Description:
    Links:
  52. Île de Gorée Statue

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Senegalese Attractions, Top Ten Slaves,
  53. Statue von Behanzin, Abomey, Benin

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Benin Attractions,
  54. Hercules, Ceuta

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Ceuta Attractions, Top Ten Spanish Attractions, Top Ten Greek Heroes,
  55. Djibouti City Statue

    Description:
    Links:
  56. Konso Wood Satues

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Ethiopian Attractions,
  57. Copper Statues of Pepi I Meryre

           Pepi I Meryre (reigned 2332 – 2283 BC) was the 3rd king of the 6th dynasty of Egypt. His first throne name was Neferdjahor which the king later altered to Meryre meaning “beloved of Rê.”
    Links: Top Ten Pharaohs, Top Ten Egyptian Gods, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepi_I_Meryre,
  58. Dakar Statue

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Senegalese Attractions,
  59. Statue of Andries Wilhelmus Jacobus Pretorius

    Andries Wilhelmus Jacobus Pretorius (27 November 1798 – 23 July 1853) was a leader of the Boers who was instrumental in the creation of the Transvaal Republic, as well as the earlier but short-lived Natalia Republic, in present-day South Africa.
    Links: Top Ten South African Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andries_Wilhelmus_Jacobus_Pretorius,
  60. Aloalo

           The aloalo is a funerary pole sculpture that, along with the skulls of slaughtered zebu, is placed on the tombs of important people in the south-western region of Madagascar. These carved posts often tell the story of the person’s life and generally take the form of a series of geometric or symbolic shapes topped by sculpted figures or objects evocative of the deceased’s life. They are chiefly associated with the Mahafaly people, although they are also found on the tombs of some Antandroy and particularly the Sakalava, whose carved figures are reputed for their often erotic imagery.
    Links: Top Ten Tombs,
  61. Nobel Square Statues

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten South African Attractions, Top Ten South African Hotels,
  62. Links: Sculptures, Top Ten Egyptian Sculptures, African Attractions,