Top 100 Asian Sculptures

Top 100 Asian Sculptures

  1. Starving Buddha, Taxila, Pakistan

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha,
  2. Monolithic Narasimha, Vijayanagara, India

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions,
  3. Bronze Daibutsu, Kōtoku-in, Kamakura, Japan (1252

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha,
  4. Spring Temple Buddha (2002)

    The Spring Temple Buddha is a statue depicting Vairocana Buddha located in the Zhaocun township of Lushan County, Henan, China. It is placed within the Fodushan Scenic Area, close to National Freeway no. 311. At 128 m (420 ft), which includes a 20 m (66 ft) lotus throne, it is the tallest statue in the world.
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_Temple_Buddha,
  5. Terracotta Warriors

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Chinese AttractionsTop 100 Artifacts, Top Ten Chinese Artifacts, Top Ten Warriors,
  6. Tōdai-ji Daibutsu

    Daibutsu or ‘giant Buddha’ is the Japanese term, often used informally, for large statues of Buddha. The oldest is that at Asuka-dera (609) and the best-known those of Tōdai-ji in Nara (752) and Kōtoku-in in Kamakura (1252), both National Treasures.
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daibutsu,
  7. Bronze Chola Statue of Nataraja

    This is a bronze statue of Nataraja, which resides at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.
    Links:
  8. A bodhisattva

    A bodhisattva. Pakistan, Ancient Gandhara, 2nd-3rd century.
    Links:
  9. Goddess Kali

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Goddesses,
  10. Golden Buddha

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, http://www.thailandamulets.com/showRoom.php?cate=32&scate=100,
  11. Genghis Khan Equestrian Statue

           The Genghis Khan Statue complex is located 54 km from Ulan Bator, Mongolia, on the bank of the Tuul River, in a place called Tsonjin Boldog, where Genghis Khan had found a golden whip according to legend. A 40 meter high statue on horseback was erected on a 10 meter high base, covered by stainless steel and surrounded by 36 columns. Those 36 columns are meant for the memorial of 36 kings’ intermarry from Genghis until Ligden Khan. A recreation area, restaurants, souvenir shop and conference hall occupy the base structure. From here, visitors will ascend to the exhibition hall using an elevator at the back of the horse.
    Links: Top Ten Warriors, Top Ten Warlords, Top Ten Empires, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genghis_Khan_Equestrian_Statue,
  12. Ushiku Daibutsu (1993)

    The Ushiku Daibutsu, located in Ushiku, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, is one of the world’s tallest statues. Completed in 1993, it stands a total of 120 meters (394 feet) tall, including the 10m high base and 10m high lotus platform. An elevator takes visitors up to 85m off the ground, where an observation floor is located. It depicts Amitabha Buddha and is plated with bronze. It is also known as Ushiku Arcadia (Amida’s Radiance and Compassion Actually Developing and Illuminating Area). It was built to commemorate the birth of Shinran, founder of the Jōdo Shinshū or “True Pure Land School” of Buddhism.
    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions, Top Ten Tallest Statues, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ushiku_Daibutsu,
  13. Buddha Statue Elephant Rock

    Description:
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  14. Nihon-ji Daibutsu and Hundred-shaku Kannon, Japan

    Mount Nokogiri is a low mountain on the Bōsō Peninsula on Honshu, Japan. It lies on the southern border of the city of Futtsu and the town Kyonan in Awa District in Chiba Prefecture. It falls steeply into Tokyo Bay on its western side, where it is pierced by two road tunnels and a rail tunnel, carrying the Uchibo Line south from Futtsu to Tateyama. Both features are due in part to the mountain’s history as a stone quarry in the Edo period, the marks of which are still picturesquely evident. The western side of the mountain is also the site of the sprawling Nihon-ji temple complex, which is the home of two Daibutsu sculptures, a huge seated carving of Yakushi Nyorai that at 31.05 meters (101.9 ft) tall is the largest pre-modern, stone-carved Daibutsu in Japan, and the “Hundred-shaku Kannon,” a tall relief image of Kannon carved into one of the quarry walls. It is also home to 1,500 hand-carved arhat sculptures, which combined with the spectacular scenery of the Bōsō Hills and Tokyo Bay, make Mount Nokogiri a popular tourism destination. The temple is accessible by road and by a cable car, the Nokogiriyama Ropeway, which runs from Hamakanaya Station on the JR Uchibo Line to a lookout deck near the top of the temple precinct. The western end of the mountain falls precipitously into Tokyo Bay, where Cape Myōgane is a good place to watch large ships pass through Uraga Channel at sunset.
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Nokogiri_%28Chiba%29,
  15. Shwedagon Pagoda Buddhas

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Pagodas,
  16. Mihintale Buddha Statue

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha,
  17. Yu the Great Statues

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Emperors,
  18. Ravana, Sri Lanka and Thailand

    Rāvaṇa is the primary antagonist character of the Hindu legend, the Ramayana; who was a king of Lanka. In the classic text, he is mainly depicted negatively, kidnapping Rama’s wife Sita, to claim vengeance on Rama and his brother Lakshmana for having cut off the nose of his sister Surpanakha. This depiction is, however, open to other interpretations. Ravana is described as a devout follower of Shiva, a great scholar, a capable ruler and a maestro of the Veena. He has his apologists and staunch devotees within the Hindu traditions, some of whom believe that his description as a ten-headed person (Daśagrīva) is a reference to him possessing a very thorough knowledge over the 4 Vedas and 6 Upanishads, which made him as powerful as 10 scholars. However, there is mention in Atharvaveda of demonic Brahmans called Dasagva (ten-headed) and Navagva (nine-headed) and the metaphor of a supernatural number of bodyparts to symbolize powers is an ancient one in Indian mythic depictions. Yet another interpretation of the ten-headed Ravana describe him to be a complete man with nine of his heads representing nine emotions that a man may possess (viz.anger, pride, jealousy, happiness, sadness, fear, selfishness, passion, ambition) and one representing the intellect. Ravana also authored Ravana Sanhita, a powerful book on the Hindu astrology. Ravana possessed a thorough knowledge of Ayurveda and political science. He is said to have possessed the nectar of immortality, which was stored under his navel, thanks to a celestial boon by Brahma. According to some theories, he was a historical emperor who reigned over Sri Lanka from 2554 BC to 2517 BC. The lake Rakshastaal, a salt water formation in Tibet, high up in Himalayas located right next to fresh-water lake Manasarovar is considered to be the place of severe penance tapasya by Ravana.
    Links: Top Ten Thai Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravana,
  19. Amida Nyorai (1202)

    Description:
    Links: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/busshi-buddha-sculptor-kaikei-japan.html,
  20. Miroku Bosatsu (1189)

    Description:
    Links: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/busshi-buddha-sculptor-kaikei-japan.html,
  21. Thiruvalluvar Statue

    The Thiruvalluvar Statue is a 133 feet (40.5 m) tall stone sculpture of the Tamil poet and saint Tiruvalluvar, author of the Thirukkural. It was opened on January 1, 2000 and is located atop a small island near the town of Kanyakumari, where two seas and an ocean meet; the Bay of Bengal, the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean. The statue has a height of 95 feet (29 m) and stands upon a 38 foot (11.5 m) pedestal that represents the 38 chapters of “virtue” in the Thirukkural. The statue standing on the pedestal represents “wealth” and “pleasure,” signifying that wealth and love be earned and enjoyed on the foundation of solid virtue. The combined height of the statue and pedestal is 133 feet (40.5 m), denoting the 133 chapters in the Thirukkural. It has a total weight of 7,000 tons. The statue, with its slight bend around the waist is reminiscent of a dancing pose of the ancient Indian deities like Nataraja. It was sculpted by the Indian sculptor Dr. V. Ganapati Sthapati, who also created the Iraivan Temple. This monument was hit by the Indian Ocean Tsunami of December 26, 2004.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiruvalluvar_Statue,
  22. Arjuna, Bali

    In Indian mythology, Arjuna is the greatest warrior on earth and is one of the Pandavas, the heroes of the Hindu epic Mahābhārata, and a key historical figure in the Dwapar Yuga. Arjuna, whose name. means ‘bright,’ ‘shining,’ ‘white’ or ‘silver,’ was such a peerless archer that he is often referred to as Vishnu – the unbeatable. The third of the five Pandava brothers, Arjuna was the son of the king of gods, Indra, and Kunti, wife of king Pandu of Kuru. Arjuna was an ambidextrous master archer and as a Maharathi played a key role in the victory of Yudhisthira in the Mahabharata War. Taught by the master of military arts Drona, Arjuna used the magnificent bow Gāndeeva, and killed many Kaurava generals like Karna and Jayadratha. He was also a close friend of Krishna, an Avatar of god Vishnu. Arjuna had four wives, Subhadra, Draupadi, Chitrangada and Ulupi. In the epic, Arjuna is said to have an amsha, or spiritual element, of sage Nara. Nara is the eternal companion of Narayana (identified with Vishnu), and sometimes considered one of the forms of Narayana. One of his most important roles was as the dear friend and brother-in-law of Lord Krishna, from whom he heard the Bhagavad Gita before the battle of Kurukshetra, and who acted as his charioteer during the battle. Arjuna is sometimes referred to as the ‘fourth Krishna’ of the Mahabharata.
    Links: Top Ten Balinese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arjuna,
  23. Timur Statues (Uzbekistan)

           Timur (8 April 1336 – 18 February 1405), meaning “iron,” was a 14th century conqueror of West, South and Central Asia, and the founder of the Timurid dynasty (1370–1405) in Central Asia, and great, great grandfather of Babur, the founder of the Mughal Dynasty, which survived as the Mughal Empire in India until 1857. Timur was in his lifetime a controversial figure and remains so today. He sought to restore the Mongol Empire, yet his heaviest blow was against the Islamized Tatar Golden Horde. He was more at home in an urban environment than on the steppe. He styled himself a ghazi while conducting wars that severely affected some Muslim states, for example the Ottoman Empire. A great patron of the arts, his campaigns also caused vast destruction.
    Links: Top Ten Uzbekistani Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timur,
  24. Kudara Kannon

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  25. Aphrodite Statue, Nisa, Turkmenistan

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Turkmenistani Attractions,
  26. Avalokiteshvara Statues

    Avalokiteśvara is a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. He is one of the more widely revered bodhisattvas in mainstream Mahayana Buddhism, as well as unofficially in Theravada Buddhism. Avalokiteśvara is often depicted as having a thousand eyes that see all the pain in the universe and a thousand arms that reach out extend his help. The original name for this bodhisattva was Avalokitasvara. The Chinese name for Avalokiteśvara is Guānshìyīn Púsà, which is a translation of the earlier name “Avalokitasvara Bodhisattva.” This bodhisattva is variably depicted as male or female, and may also be referred to simply as Guānyīn in certain contexts. In Sanskrit, Avalokitesvara is also referred to as Padmapāni (“Holder of the Lotus”) or Lokeśvara (“Lord of the World”). In Zen Buddhism, Avalokiteshwara was equated with Bodhi Dharma in his Nirmanakaya form and Shaolin monks worshipped him as Vajrapani is his Sambogakaya form. In Tibetan, Avalokiteśvara is known as Jainraisig, and is said to be incarnated in the Dalai Lama, the Karmapa and other high lamas.
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avalokiteshvara,
  27. Ming Dynasty Lion Statue in the Forbidden City

           This Ming Dynasty Lion Statue in the Forbidden City, China has a spherical object resembling the Flower of Life held under its right paw.
    Links: Sacred Geometry, Top Ten Gates, Top Ten Chinese Attractions,
  28. Ertuğrul

           Ertuğrul was the father of Osman I, the founder of the Ottoman Empire. He was the leader of the Kayı clan of the Oghuz Turks. When arriving in Anatolia from Merv (Turkmenistan) with his 400 horsemen to aid the Seljuks of Rum against the Byzantines, Ertuğrul set off the chain of events that would ultimately lead to the founding of the Ottoman Empire. Like his son, Osman, and his future descendants, Ertuğrul is often referred to as a Ghazi, a heroic champion fighter for the cause of Islam.
    Links: Top Ten Warriors, Top Ten Mosques, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ertugrul_gazi,
  29. Todai-ji Guardians, Japan

    Tōdai-ji is a Buddhist temple complex located in the city of Nara, Japan. Its Great Buddha Hall, the largest wooden building in the world, houses the world’s largest bronze statue of the Buddha Vairocana, known in Japanese simply as Daibutsu. The temple also serves as the Japanese headquarters of the Kegon school of Buddhism. The temple is renowned as “Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara”, together with seven other sites including temples, shrines and places in the city of Nara. Sika deer, regarded as messengers of the gods in the Shinto religion, roam the grounds freely.
    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%8Ddai-ji,
  30. Xú Fú

    Xú Fú was born in 255 BC in Qi, and served as a court sorcerer in Qin Dynasty China. He was sent by Qin Shi Huang to the eastern seas twice to look for the elixir of life. His two journeys occurred between 219 BC and 210 BC. It was believed that the fleet included 60 barques and around 5,000 crew members, 3,000 boys and girls, and craftsmen of different fields. After he embarked on a second mission in 210 BC, he never returned. Some sources have pointed to 500 boys and 500 girls instead. Various records suggest that he may have arrived and died in Japan.
    Links: Top Ten Asian Explorers, Top Ten 3rd Century BC Explorers, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xu_Fu,
  31. Jizō Bosatsu (Early 13th Century)

    Description
    Links: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/busshi-buddha-sculptor-kaikei-japan.html,
  32. Hōryū-ji Guardian Statue

    Description:
    Links:
  33. Standing Buddha from Gandhara, Pakistan (1st Century AD)

           The Standing Buddha of the Tokyo National Museum is a remarkable example of Greco-Buddhist statuary. Comparable ones can be found in the Musee Guimet in France, and in various museum of the Indian subcontinent. The statue is dated by the museum to the 1st or 2nd century AD.
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_Buddha,
  34. Goddess of Peace Monument, Shanghai, China

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  35. Shōwa Daibutsu, Japan

           Seiryū-ji is a Kōyasan Betsuin (an affiliate temple) located in Aomori, Aomori Prefecture. The temple was founded by a Great Acharya Ryūkou Oda, who later built Shōwa Daibutsu in 1984. Roughly 21.35 meters in height, it is the tallest seated bronze figure of Buddha in Japan.
    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiry%C5%AB-ji,
  36. Rahu

           In Hindu tradition, Rahu, is a cut-off head of an asura that swallows the sun or the moon causing eclipses. He is depicted in art as a serpent with no body riding a chariot drawn by eight black horses. Rahu is one of the navagrahas (nine planets) in Vedic astrology. The Rahu kala (time of day under the influence of Rahu) is considered inauspicious. According to legend, during the Samudra manthan, the asura Rahu drank some of the divine nectar. Sun and moon realized it and they alerted Mohini (the female avatar of Vishnu). Before the nectar could pass his throat, Mohini cut off his head. The head, however, remained immortal. It is believed that this immortal head occasionally swallows the sun or the moon, causing eclipses. Then, the sun or moon passes through the opening at the neck, ending the eclipse. Astronomically (as per Hindu Astrology), Rahu and Ketu denote the two points of intersection of the paths of the Sun and the Moon as they move around the celestial sphere. Therefore, Rahu and Ketu are respectively called the north and the south lunar nodes. The fact that eclipses occur when Sun and Moon are at one of these points gives rise to the myth of the swallowing of the Sun. Rahu is a legendary master of deception who signifies cheaters, pleasure seekers, operators in foreign lands, drug dealers, poison dealers, insincere and immoral acts, etc. It is the significator of an irreligious person, an outcast, harsh speech, logical fallacy, falsehoods, uncleanliness, abdominal ulcers, bones and transmigration. Rahu is instrumental in strengthening one’s power and converting even an enemy into a friend. In Buddhism Rahu is one of the krodhadevatas (terror-inspiring gods).
    Links: Top Ten Hindu Gods, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rahu,
  37. Kujaku Myō-ō (1200 AD)

    Description:
    Links: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/busshi-buddha-sculptor-kaikei-japan.html,
  38. Qin Shi Huang Statue

           Qin Shi Huang (259 BC – 210 BC), personal name Ying Zheng, was king of the Chinese State of Qin from 246 BC to 221 BC during the Warring States Period. He became the first emperor of a unified China in 221 BC. He ruled until his death in 210 BC at the age of 49. Calling himself the First Emperor after China’s unification, Qin Shi Huang is a pivotal figure in Chinese history, ushering nearly two millennia of imperial rule. After unifying China, he and his chief advisor Li Si passed a series of major economic and political reforms. He undertook gigantic projects, including the first version of the Great Wall of China, the now famous city-sized mausoleum guarded by a life-sized Terracotta Army, and a massive national road system, all at the expense of numerous lives. To ensure stability, Qin Shi Huang outlawed and burned many books and buried some scholars alive.
    Links: Top Ten Emperors, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qin_Shi_Huang,
  39. Statue from the Ancient City of Polonnaruwa

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Sri Lankan Attractions,
  40. Statue of Saladin, Damascus, Syria

           The Statue of Saladin is an oversize equestrian bronze statue depicting the Kurdish Ayyubid Sultan Saladin located in front of the Citadel of Damascus in Damascus, Syria. The statue, designed by Syrian sculptor Abdallah al-Sayed and erected at municipal expense, was unveiled by the late Syrian president Hafez Assad in 1993 to mark the 800th anniversary of Saladin’s death.
    Links: Top Ten Warriors, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statue_of_Saladin,
  41. The Four Great Kings
    File:Fourheavenlykings4096x1360.jpg
           In the Buddhist faith, the Four Heavenly Kings are four gods, each of whom watches over one cardinal direction of the world. They currently live in the Cāturmahārājika heaven (Pāli Cātummahārājika, “Of the Four Great Kings”) on the lower slopes of Mount Sumeru, which is the lowest of the six worlds of the devas of the Kāmadhātu. They are the protectors of the world and fighters of evil, each able to command a legion of supernatural creatures to protect the Dharma. They are: Vaiśravaṇa (Kubera), Virūḍhaka, Dhṛtarāṣṭra and Virūpākṣa.
    Links: Top Ten Kings, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Heavenly_Kings,
  42. Shintō Deity Hachiman

    Description:
    Links: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/busshi-buddha-sculptor-kaikei-japan.html,
  43. Sophia, Ephesus, Turkey

           Sophia (Σοφíα, Greek for “wisdom”) is a central term in Hellenistic philosophy and religion, Platonism, Gnosticism, Orthodox Christianity, Esoteric Christianity, as well as Christian mysticism. Sophiology is a philosophical concept regarding wisdom, as well as a theological concept regarding the wisdom of God. The term philosophy derives from the Greek words meaning love of Sophia, philosophia.
    Links: Top Ten Goddesses, Top Ten Turkish Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophia_(wisdom),
  44. Qin Shi Huang and Attendants

           A modern statue of the First Emperor and his attendants.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qin_Shi_Huang,
  45. Thiruvanaikaval Temple Statue

    Description:
    Links: Temples, Top Ten Asian TemplesTop Ten Indian Temples,
  46. Fengdu Ghost City Statues

    Fengdu Ghost City is a necropolis situated in Fengdu County about 170 km (110 miles) downstream from Chongqing Municipality on the north bank of the Yangtze River in the People’s Republic of China. Fengu Ghost City is a Yangtze cruise tourist attraction featuring buildings and ghosts that provide a model of hell.
    Links: Top Ten Necropolises, Top Ten Ghosts, Top Ten Ghost Towns, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fengdu_Ghost_City,
  47. Amida Triad (1197 AD)

    Description:
    Links: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/busshi-buddha-sculptor-kaikei-japan.html,
  48. Shuanglin Si Temple Statue, China

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Chinese Attractions,
  49. Maman Statue, Japan

    Maman (1999) is a sculpture by the artist Louise Bourgeois. The sculpture, which resembles a spider, is over 30 ft. high and over 33 ft. wide, with a sac containing 26 marble eggs. Its abdomen and thorax are made up of ribbed bronze. The title is the familiar French word for Mother. Bourgeois created “Maman” as a part of her inaugural commission of The Unilever Series in 1999 for Tate Modern Museum’s vast Turbine Hall. Acquiring this magnificent sculpture is considered as one of the Tate Museum’s historical moments. Maman was first displayed outside the Tate Museum of London in 2000. It was received with the mixed reactions of amazement and amusement. The sculpture picks up the theme of the arachnid that Bourgeois had first contemplated in a small ink and charcoal drawing in 1947. It alludes to the strength of Bourgeois’ mother, with metaphors of spinning, weaving, nurture and protection. Her mother Josephine was a woman who repaired tapestries in her father’s textile restoration workshop in Paris. Bourgeois lost her mother at the age of 21. A few days afterwards, in front of her father who did not seem to take his daughter’s despair seriously, she threw herself into the Bièvre River; he swam to her rescue.
    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions, Top Ten Sculptures by Louise Bourgeois, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maman,
  50. Acintya Sculpture, Bali

           Acintya, also Atintya (Sanskrit: “the unthinkable,” “the inconceivable,” “he who cannot be imagined”), also Tunggal (Balinese: “Unity”) is the supreme god of Indonesian Hinduism (formally known as Agama Hindu Dharma), especially on the island of Bali. He is equivalent to the concept of Brahman, and is the Supreme God in traditional wayang (shadow puppet) theatre. He is also known to most modern Balinese as Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa, also Sanghyang Widi Wasa (the “All-In-One God”), a term invented in the 1930’s by Christian missionaries to describe the Christian god to the Balinese.
    Links: Top Ten Thrones, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acintya,
  51. Ephesus Statue

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  52. Nellaiappar Temple Pillar

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    Links: Temples, Top Ten Asian TemplesTop Ten Indian Temples, Top Ten Indian Attractions, Top Ten Columns/Pillars,
  53. Statue (3rd Century BC)

           Didarganj Yakshi, Style of draping the lower garment during Mauryan era. Worn supported on the waist with a girdle. One half carried to right arm across the left and the back.
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  54. Standing Hanuman (11th Century AD)

           Standing Hanuman, Chola Dynasty, 11th Century.
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  55. Bronze Statues of Lord Shiva and Parvati (11th Century AD)

           These statues are of Lord Shiva as a cowherd and Parvati. They currently reside at the Ulster Museum.
    Links:
  56. The King

           Assyrian, 875–860 B.C. From Nimrud, Temple of Ishtar Sharrat-niphi. Magnesite. Statue: H 113 cm, W 32 cm, D 15 cm. Base: H 78 cm, W 35 cm, D 55 cm. ME 118871. The Trustees of the British Museum.
    Links: Top Ten Kings, Top Ten Assyrian Artifacts,
  57. Rudra

           Rudra is a Rigvedic God, associated with wind or storm and the hunt. The name has been translated as “The Roarer,” or “The Howler.” The theonym Shiva originates as an epithet of Rudra, the adjective shiva “kind” being used euphemistically of the god who in the Rigveda also carries the epithet ghora “terrible.” Usage of the epithet came to exceed the original theonym and by the post-Vedic period (in the Sanskrit Epics), the name Rudra is taken as a synonym for the god Shiva and the two names are used interchangeably.
    Links: Top Ten Hindu Gods, Top Ten Gods of the Underworld,
  58. Dhyani Buddha Vairocana, Mendut Temple, Indonesia

           Mendut is a 9th century Buddhist temple, located in Mendut village, Mungkid sub-district, Magelang Regency, Central Java, Indonesia. The temple is located about three kilometers east from Borobudur. Mendut, Borobudur and Pawon, all of which are Buddhist temples, are located in one straight line. There is a mutual religious relationship between the three temples, although the exact ritual process is unknown.
    Links: Top Ten Indonesian Attractions, Temples, Top Ten Asian Temples, Top Ten Buddhist Templeshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mendut,
  59. Miroku Bosatsu (1189)

    Description:
    Links: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/busshi-buddha-sculptor-kaikei-japan.html,
  60. Seokguram Grotto Buddha, South Korea

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    Links: Top Ten South Korean Attractions, Top Ten Statues of Buddha,
  61. Nagasaki Peace Memorial, Japan

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    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions,
  62. Kōtoku-in

           Kōtoku-in is a Buddhist temple of the Jōdo-shū sect in the city of Kamakura in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The temple is renowned for its “Great Buddha,” a monumental outdoor bronze statue of Amida Buddha which is one of the most famous icons of Japan.
    Links: Temples, Top Ten Asian Temples, Top Ten Buddhist Templeshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C5%8Dtoku-in,
  63. Takaoka Daibutsu, Japan

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    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions,
  64. Monk Chōgen Shunjōbō (Early 13th Century)

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    Links: http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/busshi-buddha-sculptor-kaikei-japan.html,
  65. Joabulsang Bronzed Buddha, South Korea

    Description:
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, Top Ten South Korean Attractions,
  66. Kamagaya Great Buddha, Japan

           The Kamagaya Great Buddha is the smallest Daibutsu in Japan. It was completed in November 1776 and is located in Kamagaya, Chiba Prefecture.
    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamagaya_Great_Buddha,
  67. Tokyo Daibutsu, Japan

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  68. Bixie Statues

           A Bixie, is a type of lion-like mythological Chinese creature, or chimera. It is considered as an exorcising animal, literally means “Avoid Evil,” and is usually hornless. The Bixie can have a pair of wings, which makes it rather similar to the Tianlu in following early Chinese sculptural traditions of winged celestial beasts. The Bixie may have been an adoption from Mesopotamian art, through Persia and Bactria, as a consequence of extensive trade relations initiated by Emperor Han Wudi during the Han period. Some western scholars of Chinese art use the word “chimera” generically to refer to the bixie, qilin and tianlu.
    Links: Top Ten Chinese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bixie,
  69. Jeju Island Sculpture

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    Links: Top Ten Natural Wonders,
  70. Lakshmi

           Lakshmi is the Hindu goddess of wealth, prosperity (both material and spiritual), fortune, and the embodiment of beauty. She is the consort of the god Vishnu. Also called Mahalakshmi, she is said to bring good luck and is believed to protect her devotees from all kinds of misery and money-related sorrows. Representations of Lakshmi are also found in Jain monuments. Lakshmi is called Shri or Thirumagal because she is endowed with six auspicious and divine qualities, or Gunas, and also because she is the source of strength even to Vishnu. When Vishnu incarnated on earth as avatars Rama and Krishna, Lakshmi incarnated as his consort. Sita (Rama’s wife), Radha (Krishna’s lover) and Rukmini and the other wives of Krishna are considered forms of Lakshmi. Lakshmi is worshipped daily in Hindu homes and commercial establishments as the goddess of wealth. She also enjoys worship as the consort of Vishnu in many temples. The festivals of Diwali and Kojagiri Purnima are celebrated in her honour.
    Links: Top Ten Godessess, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lakshmi,
  71. Gomateshwara Monolith

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  72. Piri Reis, Turkey

           Piri Reis was an Ottoman admiral, geographer and cartographer born between 1465 and 1470 and died in 1554 or 1555. He is primarily known today for his maps and charts collected in his Kitab-ı Bahriye (Book of Navigation), a book which contains detailed information on navigation, as well as very accurate charts (for its time) describing the important ports and cities of the Mediterranean Sea. He gained fame as a cartographer when a small part of his first world map (prepared in 1513) was discovered in 1929 at the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul. His world map is the oldest known Turkish atlas showing the New World, and one of the oldest maps of America still in existence in the world (the oldest known map of America that is still in existence is the map drawn by Juan de la Cosa in 1500, which is conserved in the Naval Museum (Museo Naval) of Madrid, Spain). Piri Reis’ map is centered on the Sahara at the latitude of the Tropic of Cancer. In 1528 Piri Reis drew a second world map, of which a small fragment (showing Greenland and North America from Labrador and Newfoundland in the north to Florida, Cuba and parts of Central America in the south) still survives. According to his imprinting text, he had drawn his maps using about twenty foreign charts and mappae mundi (Arab, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Indian and Greek) including one of Christopher Columbus.
    Links: Top 100 Maps, Top Ten Piri Reis Maps, Top Ten Turkish Attractions,
  73. Door Guardian Statues (14th Century)

           Pair of door guardians from a temple, Eastern Java, 14th century (Museum of Asian Art, San Francisco)
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  74. Statue

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  75. Gold Statue of Indic Goddess

           Found in 1917 in a Mindanao riverbank, the Image is a 4.5 pound, 21-karat gold statue of an Indic goddess. It was originally identified as Hindu, but Prof. Juan Francisco argued that Hindu goddesses were rarely in cast in gold, and they were usually depicted standing, not seated in the lotus position as this was. He consequently proposed that the image was a Tara of Mahayana Buddhism, dating back to the Indo-Javanese Madjapahit Empire.
    Links: Top 100 Gold Artifacts, http://ericflo.blogspot.com/2007/03/opium-vivien-tan_11.html,
  76. Manjusri Statue

           Manjusri (Wenshu). Early 15th century, China, Ming dynasty
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  77. Prajnaparamita Statue

           The serene beauty of Prajnaparamita statue found near Singhasari temple is believed to be the portrayal statue of Queen Dedes (the collection of National Museum of Indonesia), the extraordinary beauty of this statue marked the refinement of Singhasari art.
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  78. Boddhisatva Avalokitesvara Statue

           The boddhisatva Avalokitesvara, with a thousand arms and a thousand eyes, about 950 AD (Musee Guimet, Paris Song Dynasty and Liao, Jin, Western Xia
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  79. Chandragupta Maurya Statue

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  80. Gold Statue of Avalokiteçvara

           The graceful gold coated bronze statue of four handed Avalokiteçvara in Malayu-Srivijayan style, discovered at Rataukapastuo, Muarabulia
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  81. Statue of Avalokiteçvara

           The graceful gold coated bronze statue of four handed Avalokiteçvara in Malayu-Srivijayan style, discovered at Rataukapastuo, Muarabulia
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  82. Laos Statue

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    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha,
  83. Murugan Statue, Kuala Lumpur

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  84. Cham Sculpture

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  85. Huma Bird, Persopolis, Iran (500 BC)

    The Huma, also Homa, is a legendary bird especially of the Persian branch of Iranian mythology and Sufi fable. It is said to never come to rest, living its entire life flying invisibly high above the earth, and never alighting on the ground (in some legends it is said to have no legs).
    Links: Top 100 Birds,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huma_bird,
  86. Batu Caves Statue, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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    Links: Top Ten Malaysian Attractions, Caves, Top Ten Asian Caves,
  87. Bruce Lee Statue, Hong Kong, China

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    Links: Top Ten Bruce Lee Movies, Top Ten Kung Fu Movies, Top Ten Martial Artists, Top Ten Fighters,
  88. Bas-Relief Sculptures at Unakoti, Tripura, India

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    Links: Top Ten Indian Attractions,
  89. Bull, Shanghai, China

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    Links: Top 100 North American Sculptures,
  90. Greek Goddess Themis “Justice,” Legco Building

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    Links: Top Ten Greek Gods,
  91. Bronze Lion, HSBC Headquarters

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    Links: Top Ten Big Cats,
  92. Western Xia Imperial Tomb Statue

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    Links: Top Ten Necropolises,
  93. Miyamoto Musashi and Sasaki Kojirō Duel Statue

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  94. Okunoin Cemetery Statue

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    Links: Top Ten Cemeteries, Top Ten Necropolises,
  95. Tiananmen Square Dragon Monument

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  96. Ganesha (6th Century AD, 13th Century AD, 9th Century AD)

           Ganesha is one of the deities best-known and most widely worshipped in the Hindu pantheon. His image is found throughout India and Nepal. Devotion to Ganesha is widely diffused and extends to Jains, Buddhists and beyond India. Often accredited with good luck, Ganesh is found in three talisman, which if separated are said to bring bad luck. Although he is known by many other attributes, Ganesha’s elephant head makes him particularly easy to identify. Ganesha is widely revered as the Remover of Obstacles and more generally as Lord of Beginnings and Lord of Obstacles, patron of arts and sciences, and the deva of intellect and wisdom. He is honored at the beginning of rituals and ceremonies and invoked as Patron of Letters during writing sessions. Several texts relate mythological anecdotes associated with his birth and exploits and explain his distinct iconography. Ganesha emerged a distinct deity in clearly recognizable form in the 4th and 5th centuries AD, during the Gupta Period, although he inherited traits from Vedic and pre-Vedic precursors. His popularity rose quickly, and he was formally included among the five primary deities of Smartism (a Hindu denomination) in the 9th century. A sect of devotees called the Ganapatya, who identified Ganesha as the supreme deity, arose during this period. The principal scriptures dedicated to Ganesha are the Ganesha Purana, the Mudgala Purana and the Ganapati Atharvashirsa.
    Links: Top Ten Hindu Deities, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganesha,
  97. Yaganti Nandi Statue

           The Yaganti Nandi Statue is believed to be growing in size.
    Links: Temples, Top Ten Asian Temples, Top Ten Indian Temples,
  98. Poles from Indigenous Religions, Jilin, China

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    Links: Top Ten Chinese Attractions, Top Ten Totem Poles,
  99. Christ of Vung Tau (1974-1993)

           Christ of Vung Tau is a statue of Jesus, standing on Mount Nho in Vung Tau, Ba Ria-Vung Tau Province, Dong Nam Bo, Vietnam. The Catholic Association built the statue in 1974 and it was completed in 1993. It is 32 meters (105 ft) high, standing on a 4 meter (13 ft) high platform, for a total monument height of 36 meters (118 ft). The statue also includes a 133 step staircase inside.
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Jesus, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_of_Vung_Tau,
  100. Statue of Eleven-Headed Avalokiteshvara (7th Century AD)

           This statue of the eleven headed Avalokiteshvara dates to the Tang Dynasty of Toyuk, China. The statue, which stands 38 cm, was carved out of wood and currently resides in the Berlin Museum of Asian Art.
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  101. Acalanatha

           Acalanatha, the wrathful manifestation of Mahavairocana and the principal deity invoked during the goma ritual.
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  102. Statue of Lý Thái Tổ

           Lý Thái Tổ was Đại Việt Emperor and was the founder of the Lý D‎ynasty, he reigned from 1009 AD to 1028 AD.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%BD_Th%C3%A1i_T%E1%BB%95,
  103. Bali Demon Statue

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  104. Forbidden City Tortoise

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  105. Golden Dragon Sculpture, Shuri Castle, Japan

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    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions, Top Ten Castles, Top Ten Asian Castles, Top 100 Gold Artifacts,
  106. Cook Islands Carved Wood Figure

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    Links: Top Ten Cook Islands Attractions,
  107. Singapore Merlion Statue by Fabrice Jiew

           The Merlion Malay: Singa-Laut; is an imaginary creature with the head of a lion and the body of a fish. Its name combines “mer” meaning the sea and “lion.” The fish body comes from Singapore’s ancient name back when it was a fishing village, Temasek, meaning “sea town” in Javanese. The lion head represents Singapore’s original name, Singapura, meaning “lion city” or “kota singa.” The symbol was designed by Mr. Fabrice Jiew, a member of the Souvenir Committee and curator of the Van Kleef Aquarium, for the logo of the Singapore Tourism Board (STB) in use from 26 March 1964 to 1997. The Merlion continues to be its trademark symbol since 20 July 1966.
    Links: Top Ten Fountains,
  108. Welagedara Statue

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  110. Statue

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  111. Buddha Statuette

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    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha,
  112. Sculpture

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  113. Gyeongju Historic Areas Statue, South Korea

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    Links: Top Ten South Korean Attractions,
  114. The Brazen Serpent, Mount Nebo, Jordan

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    Links: Top Ten Jordanian Attractions,
  115. Angkor Statue

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    Links: Top Ten Cambodian Attractions, Top Ten Angkor Artifacts,
  116. Lion Statuette

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    Links: Top Ten Big Cats,
  117. Angkor Statue

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    Links: Top Ten Cambodian Attractions, Top Ten Angkor Artifacts,
  118. Chen-La Buddha Statue

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  119. Lion Capital

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  120. Funan

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  121. Statues

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  122. Statuette (2nd Century BC)

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  123. Links: Sculptures, Artifacts, Asian Attractions,