Top Ten Tallest Statues

Top Ten Tallest Statues

  1. Spring Temple Buddha, China (2002)

    The Spring Temple Buddha is a statue depicting Vairocana Buddha located in the Zhaocun township of Lushan County, Henan, China. It is placed within the Fodushan Scenic Area, close to National Freeway no. 311. At 128 m (420 ft), which includes a 20 m (66 ft) lotus throne, it is the tallest statue in the world.
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, Top Ten Chinese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_Temple_Buddha,
  2. Laykyun Setkyar (2008)

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  3. Ushiku Daibutsu, Japan (1993)

           The Ushiku Daibutsu, located in Ushiku, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, is one of the world’s tallest statues. Completed in 1993, it stands a total of 120 meters (394 feet) tall, including the 10m high base and 10m high lotus platform. An elevator takes visitors up to 85m off the ground, where an observation floor is located. It depicts Amitabha Buddha and is plated with bronze. It is also known as Ushiku Arcadia.
    Links: Top Ten Statues of Buddha, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ushiku_Daibutsu,
  4. Nanshan Haishang Guanyin, China (2005)

           The Guan Yin of the South Sea of Sanya is a 108-metre statue of the bodhisattva Guan Yin, sited on the south coast of China’s island province Hainan in the Nanshan Culture Tourism Zone near the Nanshan Temple west of Sanya. The statue has three aspects; one side faces inland and the other two face the South China Sea, to represent blessing and protection by Guan Yin of China and the whole world. One aspect depicts Guan Yin cradling a sutra in the left hand and gesturing the Vitarka Mudra with the right, the second with her palms crossed, holding a string of prayer beads, and the third holding a lotus. The mantra Om mani padme hum is written in Tibetan script around each aspects’ halo. This is currently the fourth tallest statue in the world (many of which are Buddhist statues) and the tallest statue of Guan Yin in the world.
    Links: Top Ten Chinese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guanyin_Statue_of_Hainan,
  5. Emperors Yan and Huang, China (2007)

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    Links: Top Ten Chinese Attractions,
  6. Sendai Daikannon, Japan

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    Links: Top Ten Japanese Attractions,
  7. Peter the Great Statue, Russia

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    Links: Top Ten Russian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_the_Great_Statue,
  8. Great Buddha of Thailand (2008)

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    Links: Top Ten Thai Attractions,
  9. Grand Buddha at Ling Shan, China (1996)

           Located at the south of the Longshan Mountain, near Mashan, town of Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China, the Grand Buddha is one of the largest Buddha statues in China and also in the world. At more than 88 meters high, the Grand Buddha at Ling Shan is a bronze Sakyamuni standing Buddha outdoor, weighing over 700 tons. It was completed in the end of 1996.
    Links: Top Ten Chinese Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Buddha_at_Ling_Shan,
  10. Dai Kannon of Kita no Miyako Park, Japan

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  11. Bonus: Mother Motherland Calls

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  12. Bonus: Great Standing Maitreya Buddha

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  13. Bonus: Leshan Giant Buddha (1713-1803)

           The Leshan Giant Buddha was built during the Tang Dynasty (618–907 AD). It is carved out of a cliff face that lies at the confluence of the Minjiang, Dadu and Qingyi rivers in the southern part of Sichuan province in China, near the city of Leshan. The stone sculpture faces Mount Emei, with the rivers flowing below his feet. It is the largest carved stone Buddha in the world and at the time of its construction was the tallest statue in the world.
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  14. Bonus: Statue of Liberty

           The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, designed by Frédéric Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886. The statue, a gift to the US from the France, is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the US: a welcoming signal to immigrants arriving from abroad. Bartholdi was inspired by French law professor and politician Édouard René de Laboulaye, who commented in 1865 that any monument raised to American independence would properly be a joint project of the French and American peoples. Due to the troubled political situation in France, work on the statue did not commence until the early 1870’s. In 1875, Laboulaye proposed that the French finance the statue and the Americans provide the pedestal and the site. Bartholdi completed the head and the torch-bearing arm before the statue was fully designed, and these pieces were exhibited for publicity at international expositions. The arm was displayed at the Centennial Exposition in 1876 and in New York’s Madison Square Park from 1876 to 1882. Fundraising proved difficult, especially for the Americans, and by 1885 work on the pedestal was threatened due to lack of funds. Publisher Joseph Pulitzer of the World started a drive for donations to complete the project that attracted more than 120,000 contributors, most of whom gave less than a dollar. The statue was constructed in France, shipped overseas in crates, and assembled on the completed pedestal on what was then called Bedloe’s Island. The statue’s completion was marked by New York’s first ticker-tape parade and a dedication ceremony presided over by President Grover Cleveland. The statue, including the pedestal and base, was closed for a year until October 28, 2012, so that a secondary staircase and other safety features could be installed.
    Links: Top Ten US Attractions, Top 100 North American Sculptures, Top 100 US Sculptures,
  15. Bonus: Cristo Redentor (1931), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

           Overlooking the Rio de Janeiro harbor, the Cristo Redentor statue … Christ the Redeemer is a statue of Jesus Christ in Rio de Janiero, Brazil; considered the largest Art Deco statue in the world. The statue is 39.6 meters (130 ft) tall, including its 9.5 meter (31 feet) pedestal, and 30 meters (98 ft) wide. It weighs 635 tons (700 short tons), and is located at the peak of the 700 meters (2,300 ft) Corcovado mountain in the Tijuca Forest National Park overlooking the city. It is one of the tallest of its kind in the world. The statue of Cristo de la Concordia in Cochabamba, Bolivia, is slightly taller, standing at 40.44 meters (132.7 ft) tall with its 6.24 meters (20.5 ft) pedestal and 34.20 meters (112.2 ft) wide. A symbol of Catholicism, the statue has become an icon of Rio and Brazil. It is made of reinforced concrete and soapstone.
    Links: Top Ten Brazilian Attractions, Top 100 South American SculpturesTop Ten Statues of JesusTop 100 Peoplehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_the_Redeemer_(statue),
  16. Bonus: Guinea Half Portrait of a Lady

    This mysterious 150 meter tall granite cliff sculpture of a lady was found in Eastern Africa in the country of Guinea.
    Links: Top Ten Guinean Attractions, Top 100 African Sculptures,
  17. Links: Sculptures, Top 100 Sculptorshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_statues_by_height,