Top Ten Books to Read When Your High

Top Ten Books to Read When Your High

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  1. VALIS by Philip Dick
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           VALIS is a 1981 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. The title is an acronym for Vast Active Living Intelligence System, Dick’s gnostic vision of one aspect of God. It is the first book in the VALIS trilogy of novels including The Divine Invasion (1981), and the unfinished The Owl in Daylight. Together with Dick’s last book, The Transmigration of Timothy Archer (1982) (thematically related to the unfinished trilogy and included in several omnibus editions of the trilogy as a stand-in for the unwritten final volume), VALIS represents Dick’s last major work before he died. Radio Free Albemuth, a posthumously published earlier version of VALIS, is not included as a component of the VALIS trilogy.
    Links: Top Ten Books by Philip Dickhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VALIS,
  2. On The Road by Jack Kerouac
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           On the Road is a novel by American writer Jack Kerouac. On the Road is based on the travels of Kerouac and his friends across America. It is considered a defining work of the postwar Beat Generation with its protagonists living life against a backdrop of jazz, poetry and drug use. The idea for On the Road formed during the late 1940’s; it was to be Kerouac’s second novel. It underwent several drafts before Kerouac completed it in April 1951. It was first published by Viking Press in 1957. When the book was originally released, The New York Times hailed it as “the most beautifully executed, the clearest and the most important utterance yet made by the generation Kerouac himself named years ago as ‘beat,’ and whose principal avatar he is.” In 1998, the Modern Library ranked On the Road 55th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. The novel was chosen by Time magazine as one of the 100 best English-language novels from 1923 to 2005.
    Links: Top Ten Books by Jack Kerouac, Top Ten Beatniks, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_road,
  3. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
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           Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream is a novel by Hunter S. Thompson, illustrated by Ralph Steadman. The book is a roman à clef, rooted in autobiographical incidents. The story follows its protagonist, Raoul Duke, and his attorney, Dr. Gonzo, as they descend on Las Vegas to chase the American Dream through a drug-induced haze, all the while ruminating on the failure of the 1960’s counter-cultural movement. The work is Thompson’s most famous, and has been notable variably for its lurid descriptions of illegal drug use, its early retrospective on the culture of the 1960’s, and its popularization of Thompson’s highly-subjective blend of fact and fiction that has become known as gonzo journalism. The novel first appeared as a two-part series in Rolling Stone magazine in 1971, was printed as a book in 1972, and was later adapted into a film of the same name in 1998 by Terry Gilliam, starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro.
    Links: Top Ten Books by Hunter S. Thompson, Top 100 Films, Top 100 Posters, Top 100 Drug Postershttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_and_Loathing_in_Las_Vegas,
  4. Naked Lunch by William Burroughs
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           Naked Lunch is a novel by William S. Burroughs originally published in 1959. The book is structured as a series of loosely-connected vignettes. Burroughs stated that the chapters are intended to be read in any order. The reader follows the narration of junkie William Lee, who takes on various aliases, from the US to Mexico, eventually to Tangier and the dreamlike Interzone. The vignettes (which Burroughs called “routines”) are drawn from Burroughs’ own experience in these places, and his addiction to drugs (heroin, morphine, and while in Tangier, “Majoun”—a strong marijuana confection—as well as a German opioid, brand name Eukodol, of which he wrote frequently). The novel was included in Time magazine’s “100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005”. In 1991, David Cronenberg released a film of the same name based upon the novel and other Burroughs writings.
    Links: Top Ten Books by William S. Burroughs, Top Ten Drugshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naked_Lunch,
  5. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
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           Brave New World is a novel written in 1931 by Aldous Huxley and published in 1932. Set in London of AD 2540 (632 A.F. in the book), the novel anticipates developments in reproductive technology and sleep-learning that combine to change society. The future society is an embodiment of the ideals that form the basis of futurology. Huxley answered this book with a reassessment in an essay, Brave New World Revisited (1958) and with his final work, a novel titled Island (1962). In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World fifth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. In 2003, Robert McCrum writing for The Observer listed Brave New World number 53 in “the top 100 greatest novels of all time”, and the novel was listed at number 87 on the BBC’s survey The Big Read.
    Links: Top Ten Books by Aldous Huxley, Top Ten Distopian Novel, Top Ten Utopian Novelshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brave_New_World,
  6. Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
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           Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday is a 1973 novel by the American author Kurt Vonnegut. Set in the fictional town of Midland City, it is the story of “two lonesome, skinny, fairly old white men on a planet which was dying fast.” One of these men, Dwayne Hoover, is a normal-looking but deeply deranged Pontiac dealer and Burger Chef franchise owner who becomes obsessed with the writings of the other man, Kilgore Trout, taking them for literal truth. Trout, a largely unknown pulp science fiction writer who has appeared in several other Vonnegut novels, looks like a crazy old man but is in fact relatively sane. As the novel opens, Trout journeys toward Midland City to appear at a convention where he is destined to meet Dwayne Hoover and unwittingly inspire him to run amok.
    Links: Top Ten Books by Kurt Vonneguthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakfast_of_Champions,
  7. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
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           The Alchemist is a novel by Paulo Coelho first published in the year 1988. Originally written in Portuguese, it has been translated into at least 56 languages as of September 2012. An allegorical novel, The Alchemist follows a young Andalusian shepherd named Santiago in his journey to Egypt, after having a recurring dream of finding treasure there. The book has gone on to become an international bestseller. According to AFP, it has sold more than 30 million copies in 65 different languages, becoming one of the best-selling books in history and winning the Guinness World Record for most translated book by a living author. Micah Mattix, assistant professor of literature at Houston Baptist University, however wrote in September 2012 in his blog that Paulo Coelho’s The Alchemist has been “translated into 56 languages and sold more than 20 million copies worldwide”
    Links: Top Ten Books by Paulo Coelho, Top Ten Egyptian Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Alchemist_(novel),
  8. Rule of the Bone by Russel Banks
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           Rule Of The Bone is a 1995 novel by Russell Banks. It is a coming of age book about the 14-year-old American narrator, Chappie, later dubbed Bone (named for a tattoo that he gets), who, after having dropped out of school, turns to the guidance of a Rastafarian Jamaican migrant worker.
    Links: Top Ten Books by Russell Bankshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_the_Bone,
  9. Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out by Timothy Leary
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           Timothy Francis Leary (October 22, 1920 – May 31, 1996) was an American psychologist and writer, known for his advocacy of psychedelic drugs. During a time when drugs such as LSD and psilocybin were legal, Leary conducted experiments at Harvard University under the Harvard Psilocybin Project, resulting in the Concord Prison Experiment and the Marsh Chapel Experiment. Both studies produced useful data, but Leary and his associate Richard Alpert were fired from the university nonetheless. Leary believed LSD showed therapeutic potential for use in psychiatry. He popularized catchphrases that promoted his philosophy such as “turn on, tune in, drop out”; “set and setting”; and “think for yourself and question authority.” He also wrote and spoke frequently about transhumanist concepts involving space migration, intelligence increase and life extension (SMI²LE), and developed the eight-circuit model of consciousness in his book Exo-Psychology (1977). During the 1960’s and 1970’s, he was arrested often enough to see the inside of 29 different prisons worldwide. President Richard Nixon once described Leary as “the most dangerous man in America.”
    Links: Top Ten Works of Art by Dean Chamberlainhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timothy_Leary,
  10. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
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           A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian novella written by Anthony Burgess and published in 1962. Through the exploits and experiences of a teenager it explores the violent nature of humans, human free will to choose between good or evil, and the desolation of free will as a solution to evil. Set in a not-so-distant future society with a culture of extreme youth rebellion and violence it satirizes trends in youth culture that were prevalent in the 1960s in the West (and are still contemporary). Burgess experiments with language by writing in a Russian-influenced argot called “Nadsat” which is used by the novel’s teenage anti-hero in his first-person narration and the younger characters. According to Burgess, the novel was a jeu d’esprit written in just three weeks. In 2005, A Clockwork Orange was included on Time magazine’s list of the 100 best English-language novels written since 1923, and it was named by Modern Library and its readers as one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. The original manuscript of the book is located at McMaster University. Hamilton, Ontario, Canada since that institution purchased the documents in 1971.
    Links: Top Ten Books by Anthony Burgess, Top 100 Posters, Top 100 Movie Posters, Top Ten Dystopian Novels, Top Ten Utopian Novelshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clockwork_Orange,
  11. Bonus: Cannabible

           The name says it all.
    Links: Top 100 Texts, Top 100 Spiritual Texts,
  12. Links: Top 100 Books, Top 100 Writers,

Enjoy Marijuana!