Top Ten Marlon Brando Films

Top Ten Marlon Brando Films

apocalypse-brando2 (3)marlon_brando_as_stanley_kowalskiThe Godfather1

       Marlon Brando, Jr. (April 3, 1924 – July 1, 2004) was an American screen and stage actor, widely regarded as one of the greatest stage performers of the modern era. While he became notorious for his “mumbling” diction and exuding a raw animal magnetism, his mercurial performances were nonetheless highly regarded. Director Martin Scorsese said of him, “He is the marker. There’s ‘before Brando’ and ‘after Brando’.” An enduring cultural icon, Brando became a box office star during the 1950’s, during which time he racked up five Oscar nominations as Best Actor, along with three consecutive wins of the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role. He initially gained popularity for recreating the role as Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), as well as his Academy Award-winning performance as Terry Malloy in On the Waterfront (1954), and his iconic portrayal of the rebel motorcycle gang leader Johnny Strabler in The Wild One (1953). The 1960’s proved to be a fallow decade for Brando, and after 10 years in which he did not appear in a commercially successful movie, he won his second Academy Award for playing Vito Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather (1972), a role critics consider among his greatest. The movie, which became the most commercially successful film of all time when it was released revitalized Brando’s career and reestablished him in the ranks of top box office stars. He finished out the decade of the 1970’s with his controversial performance as Colonel Walter Kurtz in another Coppola film, Apocalypse Now (1979), a box office hit. Beyond the big screen, Brando was also an activist, supporting many issues, notably the African-American Civil Rights Movement and various American Indian Movements.

  1. The Godfather
    The GodfatherThe Godfather1
           The Godfather is a 1972 American crime film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and produced by Albert S. Ruddy from a screenplay by Mario Puzo and Coppola. Based on Puzo’s 1969 novel of the same name, the film stars Marlon Brando and Al Pacino as the leaders of a powerful New York crime family. The story, spanning the years 1945 to 1955, centers on the transformation of Michael Corleone (Pacino) from reluctant family outsider to ruthless Mafia boss while also chronicling the Corleone family under the patriarch Vito Corleone (Brando). The Godfather is widely regarded as one of the greatest films in world cinema—and as one of the most influential, especially in the gangster genre. Now ranked as the second greatest film in American cinema (behind Citizen Kane) by the American Film Institute, it was selected for preservation in the US National Film Registry in 1990. The film was for a time the highest grossing picture ever made, and remains the box office leader for 1972. It won three Oscars that year: for Best Picture, for Best Actor (Brando) and in the category Best Adapted Screenplay for Puzo and Coppola. Its nominations in seven other categories included Pacino, James Caan and Robert Duvall for Best Supporting Actor and Coppola for Best Director. The success spawned two sequels: The Godfather Part II in 1974, and The Godfather Part III in 1990.
    Links: Top Ten Gangster FilmsTop Ten Francis Ford Coppola Films,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_godfather, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0150742/,
  2. On the Waterfront
    File:On the Waterfront poster.jpgOn the WaterfrontFile:Eva marie saint marlon brando waterfront 2.jpg
           On the Waterfront is a 1954 American crime drama film about union violence and corruption among longshoremen. The film was directed by Elia Kazan and written by Budd Schulberg. It stars Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger, and, in her film debut, Eva Marie Saint. The soundtrack score was composed by Leonard Bernstein. It is based on “Crime on the Waterfront”, a series of articles in the New York Sun by Malcolm Johnson. The series won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting. The stories detailed widespread corruption, extortion and racketeering on the waterfronts of Manhattan and Brooklyn. On the Waterfront received 12 Academy Award nominations, winning eight, including Best Picture, Best Actor for Brando, Best Supporting Actress for Saint, and Best Director for Kazan. It is Leonard Bernstein’s only original film score not adapted from a stage production with songs.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Waterfront, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047296/,
  3. Apocalypse Now
    Apocnow.jpg
           Apocalypse Now is a 1979 American epic war film set during the Vietnam War, directed and produced by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, and Martin Sheen. The film follows the central character, US Army special operations officer Captain Benjamin L. Willard (Sheen), of MACV-SOG, on a mission to kill the renegade and presumed insane US Army Special Forces Colonel Walter E. Kurtz (Brando). The screenplay by John Milius and Coppola came from Milius’s idea of adapting Joseph Conrad’s novella Heart of Darkness into the Vietnam War era. Brando’s showing up on the set overweight, Sheen suffered a heart attack, and severe weather destroyed several expensive sets. The film’s release was postponed several times while Coppola edited millions of feet of footage. Upon release, Apocalypse Now earned widespread critical acclaim and its cultural impact and philosophical themes have been extensively discussed since. Honored with the Palme d’Or at Cannes, and nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture and the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama, the film was also deemed “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant” and was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry in 2000.
    Links: Top Ten War Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocalypse_Now, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078788/,
  4. A Streetcar Named Desire
    A Streetcar Named Desire
           A Streetcar Named Desire is the 1951 film adaptation of the 1947, Pulitzer Prize winning stage play by Tennessee Williams. Williams collaborated with Oscar Saul on the screenplay and Elia Kazan who directed the stage production went on to direct the film. Marlon Brando, Kim Hunter, and Karl Malden, all members of the original Broadway cast, reprised their roles for the film. Vivien Leigh, who had appeared in the London theatre production, was brought in for the film version in lieu of Jessica Tandy, who had created the part of Blanche DuBois on Broadway. A Streetcar Named Desire holds the distinction of garnering Academy Award wins for actors in three out of the four acting categories. Oscars were won by Vivien Leigh, Best Actress, Karl Malden, Best Supporting Actor, and Kim Hunter, Best Supporting Actress. Marlon Brando was nominated for his performance as Stanley Kowalski, and although lauded for his powerful portrayal, did not win the Oscar for Best Actor. The film is also noteworthy for being the first film to honor actors in both the Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress category.
    Links: PlaysTop Ten PlaysTop Ten Broadway PlaysTop Ten Playwrights,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Streetcar_Named_Desire_(1951_film),
  5. Viva Zapata!

           Viva Zapata! is a 1952 biographical film starring Marlon Brando and directed by Elia Kazan. The screenplay was written by John Steinbeck, using as a guide Edgcomb Pinchon’s book, Zapata the Unconquerable, a fact that is not credited in the titles of the film. The cast includes Jean Peters and, in an Academy Award-winning performance, Anthony Quinn. The movie is a fictionalized account of the life of Mexican Revolutionary Emiliano Zapata from his peasant upbringing, through his rise to power in the early 1900’s, to his death. To give the film as authentic a feel as possible, Kazan and producer Darryl F. Zanuck studied the numerous photographs that were taken during the revolutionary years, the period between 1909 and 1919 when Zapata led the fight to restore land taken from the people during the dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz. Kazan was especially impressed with the Agustin Casasola collection of photographs and he attempted to duplicate their visual style in the film. Kazan also acknowledged the influence of Roberto Rossellini’s Paisan.
    Links: Top Ten Revolutionaries,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viva_Zapata!, http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045296/,
  6. Julius Caesar
    Julius CaesarJulius Caesar1
           Julius Caesar is a 1953 MGM film adaptation of the play by Shakespeare, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who also wrote the uncredited screenplay, and produced by John Houseman. The original music score is by Miklós Rózsa. The film stars Marlon Brando as Mark Antony, James Mason as Brutus, John Gielgud as Cassius, Louis Calhern as Julius Caesar, Edmond O’Brien as Casca, Greer Garson as Calpurnia, and Deborah Kerr as Portia.Links: Top Ten Emperors,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Caesar_(1953_film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045943/,
  7. The Young Lions
    The Young Lions
           The Young Lions (1958) is a film starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and Dean Martin, about three soldiers in WWII. Christian Diestl is at first a sympathetic German drawn to Nazism by despair for his future but willing to sacrifice Jews if necessary; Noah Ackerman is an American Jew facing discrimination of the American kind; and Michael Whitacre is an American WASP (White Anglo Saxon Protestant) who struggles with his lack of meaning arising from his lack of struggles. The three have very different wars that see Christian Diestl become less sympathetic as he willingly sacrifices more and more merely to survive. Noah Ackerman finally overcomes the discrimination of his fellows in the army only to be nearly undone by the horror of the camps. While Michael Whitacre, still without meaning in his life, survives them both.
    Links: Warfare, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Young_Lionshttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052415/,
  8. Guys and Dolls

    Guys and Dolls is a 1955 musical film starring Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Frank Sinatra and Vivian Blaine. The film was made by Samuel Goldwyn Productions and distributed by MGM. It was directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who also wrote the screenplay. The film is based on the 1950 Broadway musical by composer and lyricist Frank Loesser, with a book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows based on “The Idyll Of Miss Sarah Brown” and “Blood Pressure,” two short stories by Damon Runyon. Upon Samuel Goldwyn’s and Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s requests, Frank Loesser wrote three new songs for the film: “Pet Me Poppa”, “(Your Eyes Are the Eyes of) A Woman in Love”, and “Adelaide,” the last written specifically for Sinatra. Five songs in the stage musical were omitted from the movie: “A Bushel and a Peck”, “My Time of Day” (although these are heard instrumentally as background music), “I’ve Never Been In Love Before”, “More I Cannot Wish You” and “Marry the Man Today”.
    Links: Top Ten Musicalshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guys_and_Dolls_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048140/,
  9. One Eyed Jacks (Actor and Director)
    One Eyed JacksOne Eyed Jacks1
           One-Eyed Jacks, a 1961 Western, is the only film directed by actor Marlon Brando. The picture was originally planned to be directed by Stanley Kubrick from a screenplay by Sam Peckinpah, but studio disputes led to their replacement by Brando and Guy Trosper. Brando portrays the lead character Rio, and Karl Malden plays his partner “Dad” Longworth. The supporting cast features Katy Jurado, Ben Johnson, and Slim Pickens.
    Links: Top Ten Western Films, Top Ten Stanley Kubrick Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-Eyed_Jackshttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055257/,
  10. Mutiny on the Bounty

           Mutiny on the Bounty is a 1962 film starring Marlon Brando and Trevor Howard based on the novel Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall. The film retells the 1789 real-life mutiny aboard HMAV Bounty led by Fletcher Christian against the ship’s captain, William Bligh. It is the second American film to be made from the novel, the first being Mutiny on the Bounty (1935). It was directed by Lewis Milestone, who replaced Carol Reed early on location shooting. The screenplay was written by Charles Lederer (with uncredited input from Eric Ambler, William L. Driscoll, Borden Chase, John Gay and Ben Hecht). Mutiny on the Bounty was filmed in the Ultra Panavision 70 widescreen process, the first motion picture so credited. It is notable for its location photography in the South Pacific and its musical score by Bronisław Kaper. Behind the scenes, it became notorious for the way Marlon Brando effectively took over directing duties himself and caused it to become far behind schedule and over budget.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutiny_on_the_Bounty_(1962_film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0056264/,
  11. The Men
    Book cover for "The Men".jpgThe Men
           The Men is a 1950 film directed by Fred Zinnemann. It tells the story of a WWII lieutenant, who is seriously injured in combat, and the struggles he faces as he attempts to re-enter society. It stars Marlon Brando, Teresa Wright, and Everett Sloane. The movie was written by Carl Foreman who had previously scripted Champion and Home of the Brave. Although not a commercial success, this film was notable for being Marlon Brando’s movie debut.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Men_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042727/,
  12. Sayonara
    Sayonara1
    Sayonara is a 1957 color (Technicolor) American film starring Marlon Brando. The picture tells the story of an American Air Force flier who was an ace fighter pilot during the Korean War. Sayonara won four Academy Awards, including acting honors for co-stars Red Buttons and Miyoshi Umeki. The film’s screenplay was adapted by Paul Osborn from the novel by James Michener, and was produced by William Goetz and directed by Joshua Logan. Unlike most 1950s romantic dramas, Sayonara deals squarely with racism and prejudice. The supporting cast also features Patricia Owens, James Garner, Martha Scott, and Ricardo Montalban.
    Links: Top Ten Fighter Pilotshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayonarahttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050933/,
  13. The Fugitive Kind
    The Fugitive Kind
           The Fugitive Kind is a 1959 American drama film starring Marlon Brando and Anna Magnani, and directed by Sidney Lumet. The screenplay by Meade Roberts and Tennessee Williams was based on the latter’s 1957 play Orpheus Descending, itself a revision of his unproduced 1939 work Battle of Angels. Despite being set in the Deep South, the United Artists release was filmed in Milton, New York. At the 1960 San Sebastián International Film Festival, it won the Silver Seashell for Sidney Lumet and the Zulueta Prize for Best Actress for Joanne Woodward.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fugitive_Kindhttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052832/,
  14. The Wild One
    The Wild OneThe Wild One1
           The Wild One is a 1953 American outlaw biker film directed by László Benedek and produced by Stanley Kramer. It is famed for Marlon Brando’s iconic portrayal of the gang leader Johnny Strabler.Links: Motorcycles, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wild_onehttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047677/,
  15. Links: Film, Films by Actor, Top 100 Filmshttp://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000008/,

He’ll Make You a Deal You Can’t Refuse

Top Ten James Bond Films

Top Ten James Bond Films

James Bond

       James Bond, code name 007, is a fictional character created in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming, who featured him in twelve novels and two short-story collections. Six other authors have written authorized Bond novels or novelizations since Fleming’s death in 1964: Kingsley Amis, Christopher Wood, John Gardner, Raymond Benson, Sebastian Faulks, and Jeffery Deaver; a new novel, written by William Boyd, is planned for release in 2013. The fictional British Secret Service agent has also been adapted for television, radio, comic strip, and video game formats in addition to having been used in the longest continually running and the second-highest grossing film franchise to date, which started in 1962 with Dr. No, starring Sean Connery as Bond. As of 2013, there have been twenty-three films in the Eon Productions series. The most recent Bond film, Skyfall (2012), stars Daniel Craig in his third portrayal of Bond; he is the sixth actor to play Bond in the Eon series. There have also been two independent productions of Bond films: Casino Royale (a 1967 spoof) and Never Say Never Again (a 1983 remake of an earlier Eon-produced film, Thunderball).

  1. Goldfinger
    Goldfinger
           Goldfinger is the third film in the James Bond series and also the third to star Sean Connery as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Released in 1964, it is based on the novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. The film also stars Honor Blackman as Bond girl Pussy Galore and Gert Fröbe as the title character Auric Goldfinger, along with Shirley Eaton as famous Bond girl Jill Masterson. Goldfinger was produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman and was the first of four Bond films directed by Guy Hamilton. The film’s plot has Bond investigating gold smuggling by gold magnate Auric Goldfinger and eventually uncovering Goldfinger’s plans to attack the US Bullion Depository at Fort Knox. Goldfinger was the first Bond blockbuster, with a budget equal to that of the two preceding films combined. Principal photography took place from January to July 1964 in the UK, Switzerland and the American states of Kentucky and Florida. Many of the elements introduced in the film appeared in many of the later James Bond films, such as the extensive use of technology and “gadgets” by Bond and an extensive pre-credits sequence that was not a major part of the main storyline. Goldfinger was the first Bond film to win an Academy Award and opened to largely favorable critical reception. The film was a financial success, recouping its budget in just two weeks and is hailed as the series’ quintessential episode, still being acclaimed as one of the best films in the entire Bond canon.
    Links: Top Ten Sean Connery Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldfinger_(film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058150/,
  2. From Russia With Love
    From Russia With Love
    From Russia with Love is the second spy film in the James Bond series, and the second to star Sean Connery as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Released in 1963, the film was produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, and directed by Terence Young. It is based on the 1957 novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. In the film, James Bond is sent to assist in the defection of Soviet consulate clerk Tatiana Romanova in Turkey, where SPECTRE plans to avenge Bond’s killing of Dr. No. Following the success of Dr. No, United Artists approved a sequel, doubling the budget available for the producers. In addition to filming on location in Turkey, the action scenes were shot both in Scotland and Pinewood Studios, Buckinghamshire. Production ran over budget and schedule, and had to rush to finish by its scheduled October 1963 release date. From Russia with Love was a critical and commercial success, taking over $78 million in worldwide box office receipts: more than its predecessor Dr. No.
    Links: Top Ten Sean Connery Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/From_Russia_with_Love_(film),
     http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057076/,
  3. Golden Eye

           GoldenEye (1995) is the 17th spy film in the James Bond series, and the first to star Pierce Brosnan as the fictional MI6 officer James Bond. The film was directed by Martin Campbell and is the first film in the series not to take story elements from the works of novelist Ian Fleming. In the film, Bond fights to prevent an arms syndicate from using the GoldenEye satellite weapon against London in order to cause a global financial meltdown. GoldenEye was released in 1995 after a six-year hiatus in the series caused by legal disputes, during which Timothy Dalton resigned from the role of James Bond and was replaced by Pierce Brosnan. M was also recast, with actress Judi Dench becoming the first woman to portray the character, replacing Robert Brown. GoldenEye was the first Bond film made after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, which provided a background for the plot. Some critics viewed the film as a modernisation of the series, and felt Brosnan was a definite improvement over his predecessor. The film also received award nominations for “Best Achievement in Special Effects” and “Best Sound” from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. The name “GoldenEye” pays homage to James Bond’s creator, Ian Fleming. While working for British Naval Intelligence as a lieutenant commander, Ian Fleming liaised with the American OSS to monitor developments in Spain after the Spanish Civil War in an operation codenamed Operation Golden Eye. Fleming used the name of his operation for his estate in Oracabessa, Jamaica.
    Links: Top Ten N64 VideogamesTop Ten Pierce Brosnan Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GoldenEye,
     http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113189/,
  4. Casino Royale

    Casino Royale is the 21st film in the Eon Productions James Bond film series and the first to star Daniel Craig as fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Casino Royale is set at the beginning of Bond’s career as Agent 007, just as he is earning his licence to kill. After preventing a terrorist attack at Miami International Airport, Bond falls for Vesper Lynd, the treasury employee assigned to provide the money he needs to bankrupt terrorist financier Le Chiffre by beating him in a high-stakes poker game. The story arc continues in the following Bond film, Quantum of Solace (2008). Casino Royale reboots the series, establishing a new timeline and narrative framework not meant to precede or succeed any previous Bond film, which allowed the film to show a less experienced and more vulnerable Bond. Casting the film involved a widespread search for a new actor to portray James Bond, and significant controversy surrounded Craig when he was selected to succeed Pierce Brosnan in October 2005.
    Links: Top Ten Daniel Craig Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casino_Royale_(2006_film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0381061/,
  5. Dr. No

    Dr. No is a 1962 British spy film, starring Sean Connery; it is the first James Bond film. Based on the 1958 novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. In the film, James Bond is sent to Jamaica to investigate the death of a fellow British agent. The trail leads him to the underground base of Dr. Julius No, who is plotting to disrupt an early American manned space launch with a radio beam weapon. Although the first of the Bond books to be made into a film, Dr. No was not the first of Fleming’s novels, Casino Royale being the debut for the character; however, the film makes a few references to threads from earlier books. Dr. No was produced with a low budget, and was a financial success. While critical reaction at release was mixed, over time the film received a reputation as one of the series’ best installments. Dr. No also launched a genre of “secret agent” films that flourished in the 1960’s. Many of the iconic aspects of a typical James Bond film were established in Dr. No: the film begins with an introduction to the character through the view of a gun barrel and a highly stylized main title sequence, both created by Maurice Binder.
    Links: Top Ten Sean Connery Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._No_(film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055928/,
  6. The Spy Who Loved Me
    File:Strongberglair.jpgFile:BondAndJaws.jpg
           The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) is the 10th spy film in the James Bond series, and the third to star Roger Moore as the fictional secret agent James Bond. It was directed by Lewis Gilbert and the screenplay was written by Christopher Wood and Richard Maibaum. The film takes its title from Ian Fleming’s novel The Spy Who Loved Me, the tenth book in the James Bond series, though it does not contain any elements of the novel’s plot. The storyline involves a reclusive megalomaniac named Karl Stromberg who plans to destroy the world and create a new civilisation under the sea. Bond teams up with a Russian agent Anya Amasova to stop Stromberg. Curd Jürgens and Barbara Bach co-star. It was shot on location in Egypt and Italy, with underwater scenes filmed at the Bahamas, and a whole new soundstage being built at Pinewood Studios for a massive set which depicted the interior of a supertanker. The Spy Who Loved Me was highly acclaimed by critics. The soundtrack, composed by Marvin Hamlisch, also met with success. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards amidst many other nominations and novelized in 1977 by Christopher Wood as James Bond, The Spy Who Loved Me.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Spy_Who_Loved_Me_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076752/,
  7. Live and Let Die

           Live and Let Die (1973) is the 8th spy film in the James Bond series to be produced by Eon Productions, and the first to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Although the producers had wanted Sean Connery to return after his role in the previous Bond film Diamonds Are Forever, he declined, sparking a search for a new actor to play James Bond. Moore was signed for the lead role. In the film, a Harlem drug lord known as Mr. Big plans to distribute two tons of heroin free to put rival drug barons out of business. Mr. Big, however, is revealed to be the disguised alter ego of Dr. Kananga, a corrupt Caribbean dictator, who rules San Monique, the fictional island where the heroin poppies are secretly farmed. Bond is investigating the death of three British agents, leading him to Kananga, where he is soon trapped in a world of gangsters and voodoo as he fights to put a stop to the drug baron’s scheme. Live and Let Die was released during the height of the blaxploitation era, and many blaxploitation archetypes and clichés are depicted in the film, including derogatory racial epithets (“honky”), black gangsters, and “pimpmobiles.” It departs from the former plots of the James Bond films about megalomaniac super-villains, and instead focuses on drug trafficking, depicted primarily in blaxploitation films. It is set in African American cultural centers such as Harlem and New Orleans, as well as the Caribbean Islands. It was also the first James Bond film featuring an African American Bond girl to be romantically involved with 007, Rosie Carver, who was played by Gloria Hendry.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_and_Let_Die_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070328/,
  8. The Man with the Golden Gun
    File:Seawise University wreck.jpg
           The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) is the 9th spy film in the James Bond series and the second to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. A loose adaptation of Ian Fleming’s novel of same name, the film has Bond sent after the Solex Agitator, a device that can harness the power of the sun, while facing the assassin Francisco Scaramanga, the “Man with the Golden Gun.” The action culminates in a duel between them that settles the fate of the Solex. The film was set in the face of the 1973 energy crisis, a dominant theme in the script—Britain had still not yet fully overcome the crisis when the film was released in December 1974. The film also reflects the then-popular martial arts film craze, with several kung-fu scenes and a predominantly Asian location, being shot in Thailand, Hong Kong and Macau. The film saw mixed reviews, with Christopher Lee’s performance as Scaramanga, intended to be a villain of similar skill and ability to Bond, being praised; but reviewers criticized the film as a whole, particularly the comedic approach.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_with_the_Golden_Gun_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071807/,
  9. For Your Eyes Only
    File:Meteora Agios Triadas IMG 7632.jpg
           For Your Eyes Only (1981) is the 12th spy film in the James Bond series, and the fifth to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. It marked the directorial debut of John Glen, who had worked as editor and second unit director in three other Bond films. In the plot, Bond attempts to locate a missile command system while becoming tangled in a web of deception spun by rival Greek businessmen along with Melina Havelock, a woman seeking to avenge the murder of her parents. After the over-the-top, science fiction-focused Moonraker, the producers wanted a conscious return to the style of the early Bond films and the works of 007 creator Fleming. For Your Eyes Only followed a more gritty, realistic approach, and an unusually strong narrative theme of revenge and its consequences. Filming locations included Greece, Italy, Spain and England, with underwater footage being shot in The Bahamas. For Your Eyes Only was released on 24 June 1981 to a mixed critical reception; the film was a financial success, generating $195.3 million worldwide. This was the last Bond film to be distributed solely by United Artists; the studio merged with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer soon after this film’s release.
    Links: Top Ten Monasteries, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/For_Your_Eyes_Only_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082398/,
  10. Diamonds are Forever

           Diamonds Are Forever (1971) is the 7th spy film in the James Bond series and the final to star Sean Connery as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. The story has Bond impersonating a diamond smuggler to infiltrate a smuggling ring, and soon uncovering a plot by his old nemesis Ernst Stavro Blofeld to use the diamonds and build a giant laser. Bond has to battle his nemesis for one last time, in order to stop the smuggling and stall Blofeld’s plan of destroying Washington DC, and extorting the world with nuclear supremacy. After George Lazenby left the franchise, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli tested other actors, but studio United Artists wanted Sean Connery back, paying a then-record $1.25 million salary for him to return. The producers were inspired by Goldfinger, eventually hiring that film’s director, Guy Hamilton. Locations included Las Vegas, California, Amsterdam and Lufthansa’s hangar in Germany. Diamonds Are Forever was a commercial success, but received criticism for its humorous camp tone.
    Links: Top Ten Sean Connery Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamonds_Are_Forever_(film),
  11. Moonraker

    Moonraker (1979) is the 11th spy film in the James Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore. Bond investigates the theft of a space shuttle, leading him to Hugo Drax, the owner of the shuttle’s manufacturing firm. Along with space scientist Dr. Holly Goodhead, Bond follows the trail from California to Venice, Rio de Janeiro, and the Amazon rainforest, and finally into outer space to prevent a plot to wipe out the world population and to re-create humanity with a master race. Moonraker was intended by its creator Ian Fleming to become a film even before he completed the novel in 1954, since he based it on a screenplay manuscript he had written even earlier. The film’s producers had originally intended to film For Your Eyes Only, but instead chose this title due to the rise of the science fiction genre in the wake of the Star Wars phenomenon. Moonraker was noted for its high production cost of $34 million, spending almost twice as much money as predecessor The Spy Who Loved Me, and it received very mixed reviews. However, the film’s visuals were praised, with Derek Meddings being nominated for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, and the film eventually became the highest grossing film of the series with $210,300,000 worldwide, a record that stood until 1995’s GoldenEye.
    Links: The Universe, Top Ten Moonshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonraker_(film),
  12. Links: James Bond, Top Ten Bond  Girls, Top Ten 007 Cars, Top Ten Spy Movies, Top Ten Spies,

Bond, James Bond: Licence To Thrill

Films by Actor

Films by Actor

James Bond

Top Ten Humphrey Bogart Films

Top Ten Humphrey Bogart Films

       Humphrey DeForest Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957) was an American actor and is widely regarded as an American cultural icon. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Bogart as the greatest male star in the history of American cinema. After trying various jobs, Bogart began acting in 1921 and became a regular in Broadway productions in the 1920’s and 1930’s. When the stock market crash of 1929 reduced the demand for plays, Bogart turned to film. His first great success was as Duke Mantee in The Petrified Forest (1936), and this led to a period of typecasting as a gangster with films such as Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) and B-movies like The Return of Doctor X (1939). Bogart’s breakthrough as a leading man came in 1941, with High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon. The next year, his performance in Casablanca raised him to the peak of his profession and, at the same time, cemented his trademark film persona, that of the hard-boiled cynic who ultimately shows his noble side. Other successes followed, including To Have and Have Not (1944); The Big Sleep (1946); Dark Passage (1947) and Key Largo (1948), with his wife Lauren Bacall; The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948); In a Lonely Place (1950); The African Queen (1951), for which he won his only Academy Award; Sabrina (1954); and The Caine Mutiny (1954). His last movie was The Harder They Fall (1956). During a film career of almost 30 years, he appeared in 75 feature films.

  1. Casablanca
    Casablanca1
    Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz and based on the unpublished stage play Everybody Comes to Rick’s by Murray Burnett and Joan Alison. The film stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid; and features Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson. Set during World War II, it focuses on a man torn between, in the words of one character, “love and virtue”. He must choose between his love for a woman and helping her Czech Resistance leader husband escape the Vichy-controlled Moroccan city of Casablanca to continue his fight against the Nazis.
    Links: Top 100 FilmsTop Ten Classic Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casablanca_(film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034583/,
  2. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is a 1948 American movie written and directed by John Huston, a feature film adaptation of B. Traven’s 1927 novel of the same name, in which two impecunious Americans, Fred C. Dobbs (Humphrey Bogart) and Bob Curtin (Tim Holt), during the 1920’s in Mexico join with an old-timer, Howard (Walter Huston, the director’s father), to prospect for gold. The old-timer accurately predicts trouble, but is willing to go anyway. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre was one of the first Hollywood films to be filmed almost entirely on location outside the US (in the state of Durango and street scenes in Tampico, Mexico), although the night scenes were filmed back in the studio. The film is quite faithful to the novel. In 1990, this film was selected for preservation in the US National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”
    Links: Top Ten Treasure Troveshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Treasure_of_the_Sierra_Madre_(film),
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040897/,
  3. The Maltese Falcon
    Falconm.JPGThe Maltese Falcon1
    The Maltese Falcon (1941) is a Warner Bros. film noir based on the novel of the same name by Dashiell Hammett. Directed by John Huston, the film stars Humphrey Bogart as private investigator Sam Spade and Mary Astor as his “femme fatale” client. Gladys George, Peter Lorre, and Sydney Greenstreet co-star, with Greenstreet appearing in his film debut. The Maltese Falcon was Huston’s directorial debut and was nominated for three Academy Awards. The story follows a San Francisco private detective and his dealings with three unscrupulous adventurers, all of whom are competing to obtain a jewel-encrusted falcon statuette. The Maltese Falcon has been named as one of the greatest films of all time by Roger Ebert and Entertainment Weekly, and was cited by Panorama du Film Noir Américain as the first major film noir. The film premiered on October 3, 1941 in New York City, and was selected for inclusion in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 1989.
    Links: Top Ten Film Noir Films, Artifacts, Top 100 ArtifactsTop 100 Birdshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Maltese_Falcon_(1941_film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0033870/,
  4. The Big Sleep
    The Big Sleep
    The Big Sleep is a 1946 film noir directed by Howard Hawks, the first film version of Raymond Chandler’s 1939 novel of the same name. The movie stars Humphrey Bogart as detective Philip Marlowe and Lauren Bacall as the female lead in a film about the “process of a criminal investigation, not its results.” William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett, and Jules Furthman co-wrote the screenplay. In 1997, the U.S. Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant,” and added it to the National Film Registry.
    Links: Top Ten Film Noir Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Big_Sleep_(1946_film),
     http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0038355/,
  5. The African Queen
    File:The-african-queen-1-.jpeg
    The African Queen is a 1951 adventure film adapted from the 1935 novel of the same name by C. S. Forester. The film was directed by John Huston and produced by Sam Spiegel and John Woolf. The screenplay was adapted by James Agee, John Huston, John Collier and Peter Viertel. It was photographed in Technicolor by Jack Cardiff and had a music score by Allan Gray. The film stars Humphrey Bogart (who won the Academy Award for Best Actor – his only Oscar), and Katharine Hepburn with Robert Morley, Peter Bull, Walter Gotell, Richard Marner and Theodore Bikel. The African Queen has been selected for preservation in the US National Film Registry, with the Library of Congress deeming it “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.”
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_African_Queen_(film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0043265/,
  6. The Caine Mutiny

    The Caine Mutiny is a 1954 American drama film set during WWII, directed by Edward Dmytryk and produced by Stanley Kramer. It stars Humphrey Bogart, José Ferrer, Van Johnson and Fred MacMurray, and is based on the 1951 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Herman Wouk The Caine Mutiny. The film depicts a mutiny aboard a fictitious WWII US Navy destroyer minesweeper, the USS Caine (DMS-18), and the subsequent court-martial of two officers.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Caine_Mutiny_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0046816/,
  7. To Have and Have Not
    To Have and Have Not1
    To Have and Have Not is a 1944 romance-war-adventure film. The movie was directed by Howard Hawks and stars Humphrey Bogart, Walter Brennan, and Lauren Bacall in her first film. Although it is nominally based on the novel of the same name by Ernest Hemingway, the story was extensively altered for the film.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Have_and_Have_Not_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0037382/,
  8. Key Largo
    Key Largo
    Key Largo is a 1948 film noir directed by John Huston and starring Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson and Lauren Bacall and featuring Lionel Barrymore and Claire Trevor. The movie was adapted by Richard Brooks and Huston from Maxwell Anderson’s 1939 play of the same name, which played on Broadway for 105 performances in 1939 and 1940. Key Largo was the fourth and final film pairing of married actors Bogart and Bacall. Trevor won the 1948 Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for her performance.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_Largo_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040506/,
  9. In A Lonely Place
    In A Lonely Place
    In a Lonely Place (1950) is a film noir directed by Nicholas Ray, and starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame, produced for Bogart’s Santana Productions. The script was adapted by Edmund North from the 1947 novel In a Lonely Place by Dorothy B. Hughes. Bogart stars in the film as Dixon Steele, a cynical screenwriter suspected of murder. Grahame co-stars as Laurel Gray, a neighbor who falls under his spell. Beyond its surface plot of confused identity and tormented lust, the film is a mordant comment on Hollywood mores and the pitfalls of celebrity and near-celebrity, in much the same vein as two other more widely publicized American films released that same year, Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard and Joseph Mankiewicz’s All About Eve. Although not as well known as his other work, Bogart’s performance in this film is considered by many critics to be among his finest and the film’s reputation itself has grown over time along with Ray’s.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_A_Lonely_Placehttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042593/,
  10. The Roaring Twenties
    File:The-Roaring-Twenties-Posters.jpgFile:Humphrey Bogart James Cagney Jeffrey Lynn in The Roaring Twenties trailer.jpgThe Roaring Twenties
    The Roaring Twenties is a 1939 crime thriller starring James Cagney, Priscilla Lane, Humphrey Bogart and Gladys George. The epic movie was directed by Raoul Walsh, and written by Jerry Wald, Richard Macaulay and Robert Rossen based on the story “The World Moves On” by Mark Hellinger. The Roaring Twenties was the last film that Cagney and Bogart made together. The Roaring Twenties is based on “The World Moves On”, a short story by Mark Hellinger, a columnist who had been hired by Jack Warner to write screenplays. The movie is hailed as a classic in the gangster movie genre, and considered an homage to the classic gangster movie of the early 1930’s.
    Links: Top Ten Gangster Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Roaring_Twentieshttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0031867/,
  11. Sabrina
    File:Sabrina 1954 film poster.jpg
    Sabrina is a 1954 American romantic comedy film directed by Billy Wilder, adapted for the screen by Wilder, Samuel A. Taylor, and Ernest Lehman from Taylor’s play Sabrina Fair. It stars Humphrey Bogart, Audrey Hepburn, and William Holden. This was Wilder’s last film released by Paramount Pictures, ending a 12-year relation with Wilder and the company.
    Links: Top Ten Audrey Hepburn Films, Top Ten Actresseshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabrina_(1954_film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047437/,
  12. Sahara
    File:Sahara - 1943 - -poster.png
    Sahara is a 1943 war film directed by Zoltán Korda. Humphrey Bogart stars as a US tank commander in Libya during the Western Desert Campaign of WWII. The movie earned three Academy Award nominations: Best Sound, Best Cinematography and Best Supporting Actor by J. Carrol Naish for his role as an Italian prisoner. The story is credited to an incident depicted in the 1936 Soviet film The Thirteen by Mikhail Romm. Later, Sahara was remade by André de Toth as a Western with Broderick Crawford called Last of the Comanches (1953) and by Brian Trenchard-Smith as the Australian film Sahara, with James Belushi in Bogart’s role. In the movie it depicts events which point to the Battle of Gazala which was an important battle of the Western Desert Campaign of the WWII, fought around the port of Tobruk in Libya which Bogart makes reference to which occurred in May-June 1942.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sahara_(1943_film),
  13. The Harder They Fall
    File:The Harder They Fall Poster.jpg
    The Harder They Fall (1956) was directed by Mark Robson, featuring Humphrey Bogart in his last film before his death in 1957. The film was written by Philip Yordan and based on the 1947 novel by Budd Schulberg. The drama tells a “thinly disguised à clef account of the Primo Carnera boxing scandal,” with the challenger based on Carnera and the champ based on Max Baer; previously both Baer and Carnera had starred in the 1933 movie The Prizefighter and the Lady, in which Carnera is the world champ and Baer is his challenger. Bogart’s character, Eddie Willis, is based on the career of boxing writer and event promoter Harold Conrad.
    Links: Top Ten Boxing Films, Top Ten Boxershttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Harder_They_Fallhttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0049291/,
  14. Links: Film, Top Ten Actors, Top 100 Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humphrey_Bogart,

Check Out These Classic Films