Top Ten James Bond Films

Top Ten James Bond Films

James Bond

       James Bond, code name 007, is a fictional character created in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming, who featured him in twelve novels and two short-story collections. Six other authors have written authorized Bond novels or novelizations since Fleming’s death in 1964: Kingsley Amis, Christopher Wood, John Gardner, Raymond Benson, Sebastian Faulks, and Jeffery Deaver; a new novel, written by William Boyd, is planned for release in 2013. The fictional British Secret Service agent has also been adapted for television, radio, comic strip, and video game formats in addition to having been used in the longest continually running and the second-highest grossing film franchise to date, which started in 1962 with Dr. No, starring Sean Connery as Bond. As of 2013, there have been twenty-three films in the Eon Productions series. The most recent Bond film, Skyfall (2012), stars Daniel Craig in his third portrayal of Bond; he is the sixth actor to play Bond in the Eon series. There have also been two independent productions of Bond films: Casino Royale (a 1967 spoof) and Never Say Never Again (a 1983 remake of an earlier Eon-produced film, Thunderball).

  1. Goldfinger
    Goldfinger
           Goldfinger is the third film in the James Bond series and also the third to star Sean Connery as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Released in 1964, it is based on the novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. The film also stars Honor Blackman as Bond girl Pussy Galore and Gert Fröbe as the title character Auric Goldfinger, along with Shirley Eaton as famous Bond girl Jill Masterson. Goldfinger was produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman and was the first of four Bond films directed by Guy Hamilton. The film’s plot has Bond investigating gold smuggling by gold magnate Auric Goldfinger and eventually uncovering Goldfinger’s plans to attack the US Bullion Depository at Fort Knox. Goldfinger was the first Bond blockbuster, with a budget equal to that of the two preceding films combined. Principal photography took place from January to July 1964 in the UK, Switzerland and the American states of Kentucky and Florida. Many of the elements introduced in the film appeared in many of the later James Bond films, such as the extensive use of technology and “gadgets” by Bond and an extensive pre-credits sequence that was not a major part of the main storyline. Goldfinger was the first Bond film to win an Academy Award and opened to largely favorable critical reception. The film was a financial success, recouping its budget in just two weeks and is hailed as the series’ quintessential episode, still being acclaimed as one of the best films in the entire Bond canon.
    Links: Top Ten Sean Connery Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldfinger_(film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058150/,
  2. From Russia With Love
    From Russia With Love
    From Russia with Love is the second spy film in the James Bond series, and the second to star Sean Connery as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Released in 1963, the film was produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, and directed by Terence Young. It is based on the 1957 novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. In the film, James Bond is sent to assist in the defection of Soviet consulate clerk Tatiana Romanova in Turkey, where SPECTRE plans to avenge Bond’s killing of Dr. No. Following the success of Dr. No, United Artists approved a sequel, doubling the budget available for the producers. In addition to filming on location in Turkey, the action scenes were shot both in Scotland and Pinewood Studios, Buckinghamshire. Production ran over budget and schedule, and had to rush to finish by its scheduled October 1963 release date. From Russia with Love was a critical and commercial success, taking over $78 million in worldwide box office receipts: more than its predecessor Dr. No.
    Links: Top Ten Sean Connery Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/From_Russia_with_Love_(film),
     http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057076/,
  3. Golden Eye

           GoldenEye (1995) is the 17th spy film in the James Bond series, and the first to star Pierce Brosnan as the fictional MI6 officer James Bond. The film was directed by Martin Campbell and is the first film in the series not to take story elements from the works of novelist Ian Fleming. In the film, Bond fights to prevent an arms syndicate from using the GoldenEye satellite weapon against London in order to cause a global financial meltdown. GoldenEye was released in 1995 after a six-year hiatus in the series caused by legal disputes, during which Timothy Dalton resigned from the role of James Bond and was replaced by Pierce Brosnan. M was also recast, with actress Judi Dench becoming the first woman to portray the character, replacing Robert Brown. GoldenEye was the first Bond film made after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, which provided a background for the plot. Some critics viewed the film as a modernisation of the series, and felt Brosnan was a definite improvement over his predecessor. The film also received award nominations for “Best Achievement in Special Effects” and “Best Sound” from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. The name “GoldenEye” pays homage to James Bond’s creator, Ian Fleming. While working for British Naval Intelligence as a lieutenant commander, Ian Fleming liaised with the American OSS to monitor developments in Spain after the Spanish Civil War in an operation codenamed Operation Golden Eye. Fleming used the name of his operation for his estate in Oracabessa, Jamaica.
    Links: Top Ten N64 VideogamesTop Ten Pierce Brosnan Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GoldenEye,
     http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113189/,
  4. Casino Royale

    Casino Royale is the 21st film in the Eon Productions James Bond film series and the first to star Daniel Craig as fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Casino Royale is set at the beginning of Bond’s career as Agent 007, just as he is earning his licence to kill. After preventing a terrorist attack at Miami International Airport, Bond falls for Vesper Lynd, the treasury employee assigned to provide the money he needs to bankrupt terrorist financier Le Chiffre by beating him in a high-stakes poker game. The story arc continues in the following Bond film, Quantum of Solace (2008). Casino Royale reboots the series, establishing a new timeline and narrative framework not meant to precede or succeed any previous Bond film, which allowed the film to show a less experienced and more vulnerable Bond. Casting the film involved a widespread search for a new actor to portray James Bond, and significant controversy surrounded Craig when he was selected to succeed Pierce Brosnan in October 2005.
    Links: Top Ten Daniel Craig Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casino_Royale_(2006_film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0381061/,
  5. Dr. No

    Dr. No is a 1962 British spy film, starring Sean Connery; it is the first James Bond film. Based on the 1958 novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. In the film, James Bond is sent to Jamaica to investigate the death of a fellow British agent. The trail leads him to the underground base of Dr. Julius No, who is plotting to disrupt an early American manned space launch with a radio beam weapon. Although the first of the Bond books to be made into a film, Dr. No was not the first of Fleming’s novels, Casino Royale being the debut for the character; however, the film makes a few references to threads from earlier books. Dr. No was produced with a low budget, and was a financial success. While critical reaction at release was mixed, over time the film received a reputation as one of the series’ best installments. Dr. No also launched a genre of “secret agent” films that flourished in the 1960’s. Many of the iconic aspects of a typical James Bond film were established in Dr. No: the film begins with an introduction to the character through the view of a gun barrel and a highly stylized main title sequence, both created by Maurice Binder.
    Links: Top Ten Sean Connery Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._No_(film), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055928/,
  6. The Spy Who Loved Me
    File:Strongberglair.jpgFile:BondAndJaws.jpg
           The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) is the 10th spy film in the James Bond series, and the third to star Roger Moore as the fictional secret agent James Bond. It was directed by Lewis Gilbert and the screenplay was written by Christopher Wood and Richard Maibaum. The film takes its title from Ian Fleming’s novel The Spy Who Loved Me, the tenth book in the James Bond series, though it does not contain any elements of the novel’s plot. The storyline involves a reclusive megalomaniac named Karl Stromberg who plans to destroy the world and create a new civilisation under the sea. Bond teams up with a Russian agent Anya Amasova to stop Stromberg. Curd Jürgens and Barbara Bach co-star. It was shot on location in Egypt and Italy, with underwater scenes filmed at the Bahamas, and a whole new soundstage being built at Pinewood Studios for a massive set which depicted the interior of a supertanker. The Spy Who Loved Me was highly acclaimed by critics. The soundtrack, composed by Marvin Hamlisch, also met with success. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards amidst many other nominations and novelized in 1977 by Christopher Wood as James Bond, The Spy Who Loved Me.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Spy_Who_Loved_Me_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076752/,
  7. Live and Let Die

           Live and Let Die (1973) is the 8th spy film in the James Bond series to be produced by Eon Productions, and the first to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Although the producers had wanted Sean Connery to return after his role in the previous Bond film Diamonds Are Forever, he declined, sparking a search for a new actor to play James Bond. Moore was signed for the lead role. In the film, a Harlem drug lord known as Mr. Big plans to distribute two tons of heroin free to put rival drug barons out of business. Mr. Big, however, is revealed to be the disguised alter ego of Dr. Kananga, a corrupt Caribbean dictator, who rules San Monique, the fictional island where the heroin poppies are secretly farmed. Bond is investigating the death of three British agents, leading him to Kananga, where he is soon trapped in a world of gangsters and voodoo as he fights to put a stop to the drug baron’s scheme. Live and Let Die was released during the height of the blaxploitation era, and many blaxploitation archetypes and clichés are depicted in the film, including derogatory racial epithets (“honky”), black gangsters, and “pimpmobiles.” It departs from the former plots of the James Bond films about megalomaniac super-villains, and instead focuses on drug trafficking, depicted primarily in blaxploitation films. It is set in African American cultural centers such as Harlem and New Orleans, as well as the Caribbean Islands. It was also the first James Bond film featuring an African American Bond girl to be romantically involved with 007, Rosie Carver, who was played by Gloria Hendry.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_and_Let_Die_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070328/,
  8. The Man with the Golden Gun
    File:Seawise University wreck.jpg
           The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) is the 9th spy film in the James Bond series and the second to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. A loose adaptation of Ian Fleming’s novel of same name, the film has Bond sent after the Solex Agitator, a device that can harness the power of the sun, while facing the assassin Francisco Scaramanga, the “Man with the Golden Gun.” The action culminates in a duel between them that settles the fate of the Solex. The film was set in the face of the 1973 energy crisis, a dominant theme in the script—Britain had still not yet fully overcome the crisis when the film was released in December 1974. The film also reflects the then-popular martial arts film craze, with several kung-fu scenes and a predominantly Asian location, being shot in Thailand, Hong Kong and Macau. The film saw mixed reviews, with Christopher Lee’s performance as Scaramanga, intended to be a villain of similar skill and ability to Bond, being praised; but reviewers criticized the film as a whole, particularly the comedic approach.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_with_the_Golden_Gun_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071807/,
  9. For Your Eyes Only
    File:Meteora Agios Triadas IMG 7632.jpg
           For Your Eyes Only (1981) is the 12th spy film in the James Bond series, and the fifth to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. It marked the directorial debut of John Glen, who had worked as editor and second unit director in three other Bond films. In the plot, Bond attempts to locate a missile command system while becoming tangled in a web of deception spun by rival Greek businessmen along with Melina Havelock, a woman seeking to avenge the murder of her parents. After the over-the-top, science fiction-focused Moonraker, the producers wanted a conscious return to the style of the early Bond films and the works of 007 creator Fleming. For Your Eyes Only followed a more gritty, realistic approach, and an unusually strong narrative theme of revenge and its consequences. Filming locations included Greece, Italy, Spain and England, with underwater footage being shot in The Bahamas. For Your Eyes Only was released on 24 June 1981 to a mixed critical reception; the film was a financial success, generating $195.3 million worldwide. This was the last Bond film to be distributed solely by United Artists; the studio merged with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer soon after this film’s release.
    Links: Top Ten Monasteries, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/For_Your_Eyes_Only_(film)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082398/,
  10. Diamonds are Forever

           Diamonds Are Forever (1971) is the 7th spy film in the James Bond series and the final to star Sean Connery as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. The story has Bond impersonating a diamond smuggler to infiltrate a smuggling ring, and soon uncovering a plot by his old nemesis Ernst Stavro Blofeld to use the diamonds and build a giant laser. Bond has to battle his nemesis for one last time, in order to stop the smuggling and stall Blofeld’s plan of destroying Washington DC, and extorting the world with nuclear supremacy. After George Lazenby left the franchise, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli tested other actors, but studio United Artists wanted Sean Connery back, paying a then-record $1.25 million salary for him to return. The producers were inspired by Goldfinger, eventually hiring that film’s director, Guy Hamilton. Locations included Las Vegas, California, Amsterdam and Lufthansa’s hangar in Germany. Diamonds Are Forever was a commercial success, but received criticism for its humorous camp tone.
    Links: Top Ten Sean Connery Filmshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamonds_Are_Forever_(film),
  11. Moonraker

    Moonraker (1979) is the 11th spy film in the James Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore. Bond investigates the theft of a space shuttle, leading him to Hugo Drax, the owner of the shuttle’s manufacturing firm. Along with space scientist Dr. Holly Goodhead, Bond follows the trail from California to Venice, Rio de Janeiro, and the Amazon rainforest, and finally into outer space to prevent a plot to wipe out the world population and to re-create humanity with a master race. Moonraker was intended by its creator Ian Fleming to become a film even before he completed the novel in 1954, since he based it on a screenplay manuscript he had written even earlier. The film’s producers had originally intended to film For Your Eyes Only, but instead chose this title due to the rise of the science fiction genre in the wake of the Star Wars phenomenon. Moonraker was noted for its high production cost of $34 million, spending almost twice as much money as predecessor The Spy Who Loved Me, and it received very mixed reviews. However, the film’s visuals were praised, with Derek Meddings being nominated for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, and the film eventually became the highest grossing film of the series with $210,300,000 worldwide, a record that stood until 1995’s GoldenEye.
    Links: The Universe, Top Ten Moonshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonraker_(film),
  12. Links: James Bond, Top Ten Bond  Girls, Top Ten 007 Cars, Top Ten Spy Movies, Top Ten Spies,

Bond, James Bond: Licence To Thrill