Top Ten Anticarcinogens

Top Ten Anticarcinogens

       An anticarcinogen is any chemical which reduces the occurrence of cancers, reduces the severity of cancers that do occur, or acts against cancers that do occur, based on evidence from in vitro studies, animal models, epidemiological studies and/or clinical studies. Preventative anticarcinogens act by enhancing an organism’s natural defenses against cancer, by deactivating carcinogens or by blocking the mechanisms by which carcinogens act (such as free radical damage to DNA). Anticarcinoma agents participate in the selective destruction of cancer cells, or inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Anticarcinoma agents that do not have significant negative side effects have a similar potential role, by reducing the seriousness of any cancers that do occur. There is epidemiological evidence that a diet rich in antioxidant vitamins, B17 (Laetrile) and flavonoids is anticarcinogenic. Interest in many popular nutritional supplements, including essential antioxidant nutrients such as selenium compounds and hormones such as melatonin and DHEA, is partly motivated by evidence that these have significant anticarcinogenic effects in appropriate quantities. The major psychoactive component in marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic activity, when injected into mice. The other major component of cannabis – cannabidiol, has also been shown to inhibit cancer cell growth, with low potency in non-cancer cells. Although the inhibitory mechanism is not yet fully understood, Ligresti et al. suggest that “cannabidiol exerts its effects on these cells through a combination of mechanisms that include either direct or indirect activation of CB2 and TRPV1 receptors, and induction of oxidative stress, all contributing to induce apoptosis.”

  1. Artemisia Annua (Sweet Wormword)

    Artemisia annua, also known as sweet wormwood, sweet annie, sweet sagewort or annual wormwood, is a common type of wormwood native to temperate Asia, but naturalized throughout the world. In traditional Chinese medicine, A. annua is categorized as a herb of the “heat-clearing” category. It has long been known to cure malaria, but has also been proven to eliminate cancerous cells. A University of Washington, Seattle study claims to have had success using Artemisinin in attacking cancer cells when combined with iron. Artemisinin reacts with iron to form free radicals that kill cells. Since cancer cells uptake relatively large amount of iron than normal cells, they are more susceptible to the toxic effect of artemisinin. They covalently attached artemisinin to the iron-carrying plasma glycoprotein transferrin. The study found that holotransferrin-tagged artemisinin, when compared with artemisinin, was very potent and selective in killing cancer cells. Thus, this ‘tagged-compound’ could potentially be developed into an effective chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment. For more on this topic check out the video above by Dr. Len Saputo.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_annua,
  2. Peach Seeds
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           For 3,000 years, traditional Chinese medicine has used peach kernels, also known as bitter almonds, which contain significant quantities of amygdaline, in the treatment of tumors.  Its effectiveness was so legendary that peaches are associated with immortality in Chinese culture. Zhang Guo Lao, one of the Eight Immortals associated with health and healing, is depicted carrying a Peach of Immortality. Since 1843, various forms of this substance have been used in western medicine in the treatment of human cancer.
    Links:
  3. Apricot Seeds & Sprouted Mung Beans

    “Cancer Cell Inhibition. Both of these foods share one thing in common: high levels of laetrile (vitamin B17), which has been found effective in arresting tumor growth. But how does it kill cancer cells without killing healthy cells? Without getting too technical, there is some evidence to support that when laetrile comes into contact with an enzyme called beta-glucosidase (which is only found in cancer cells), the laetrile is broken down, releasing “manufactured” hydrogen cyanide (HCN), which attacks the cancerous cell. Normal cells remain unaffected because of the mitochondrial enzyme rhodanase, which detoxifies the cyanide component. Cancer cells lack this enzyme. I’m not saying laetrile is a magical cure for cancer. But it might be a cheap preventive measure. Organic and raw apricot kernels (the seed inside the pit) are available online (try Nuts.com or iHerb.com). I blend them into my Vitamix morning smoothie. Sprout mung beans overnight (using a simple sprouting vessel) and eat over rice. Alternatively, you can make a broth with turmeric or even brew a coffee-like drink in a French Press with nutritional yeast.” — Tim Ferris
    Links: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2012/05/23/10-uncommon-superfoods-from-the-world-of-ultra-endurance/,
  4. Eggplant

           The eggplant, closely related to the tomato and potato, was domesticated in India from Solanum incanum. The fruit is botanically classified as a berry and contains numerous small, soft seeds which are edible, but have a bitter taste because they contain nicotinoid alkaloids; this is unsurprising as it is also a close relative of tobacco. Eggplant is purportedly claimed to reduce the number of cancerous cells in humans.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggplant,
  5. Cannabis
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    Cannabis is a genus of flowering plants that includes three putative varieties, Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica and Cannabis ruderalis. These three taxa are indigenous to Central Asia, and South Asia. Cannabis has long been used for fiber (hemp), for seed and seed oils, which among many other benefits is high in protein, for medicinal purposes, and as a recreational drug. Industrial hemp products are made from Cannabis plants selected to produce an abundance of fiber. Marijuana consists of the dried flowers of Cannabis plants selectively bred to produce high levels of THC and other psychoactive cannabinoids. Various extracts including hashish and hash oil are also produced from the plant. A synthetic form of the main psychoactive cannabinoid in Cannabis, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), is used as a treatment for a wide range of medical conditions, including anticarcinogenic effects, glaucoma, AIDS wasting, neuropathic pain, treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis, chemotherapy-induced nausea, treatment of allergies, inflammation, infection, epilepsy, depression, bipolar disorders, anxiety disorder, dependency and withdrawal, autoimmune disease, neuroprotection, fever, disorders of blood pressure, the list goes on and on.The Yanghai Tombs, a vast ancient cemetery (54,000 square m) situated in the Turfan district of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China, have revealed the 2,700-year-old grave of a shaman. He is thought to have belonged to the Jushi culture recorded in the area centuries later in the Hanshu, Chap 96B. Near the head and foot of the shaman was a large leather basket and wooden bowl filled with 789g of cannabis, superbly preserved by climatic and burial conditions. An international team demonstrated that this material contained tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of cannabis. The cannabis was presumably employed by this culture as a medicinal or psychoactive agent, or an aid to divination. This is the oldest documentation of cannabis as a pharmacologically active agent. Settlements which date from c. 2200-1700 BC in the Bactria and Margiana contained elaborate ritual structures with rooms containing everything needed for making drinks containing extracts from poppy (opium), hemp (cannabis), and ephedra (which contains ephedrine). “While we have no evidence of the use of ephedra among the steppe tribes, we have already seen that they did share in the cultic use of hemp, a practice that ranged from Romania east to the Yenisei River from at least the 3rd millennium BC on where its use was later encountered in the apparatus for smoking hemp found at Pazyryk.” Cannabis is first referred to in Hindu Vedas between 2000 and 1400 BC, in the Atharvaveda. By the 10th century AD, it has been suggested that it was referred to by some in India as “food of the gods”. Cannabis use eventually became a ritual part of the Hindu festival of Holi. In Buddhism, cannabis is generally regarded as an intoxicant and therefore a hindrance to development of meditation and clear awareness. In ancient Germanic culture, Cannabis was associated with the Norse love goddess, Freya. An anointing oil mentioned in Exodus is, by some translators, said to contain Cannabis. Sufis have used Cannabis in a spiritual context since the 13th century AD. In the Punjab, Cannabis or Sukha, “peace-giver,” is the term Sikhs use to refer to it. Initiated by the tenth guru of the Sikhs, Guru Gobind Singh, cannabis or bhang was used to help in meditation and was also used before battles to aid as a painkiller, growing naturally all over Punjab. Narrated by many historical and native accounts cannabis is pounded by the Sikhs, especially during religious festivals like Hola Mohalla. Even today, Nihang Sikhs gather in their thousands at Anandpur, on the occasion of the festival of Hola Mohalla and display their martial skills and of course cannabis is pounded by the Nihang Sikhs. This tradition has been in place since the time of Guru Gobind Singh. Their fighting style is referred to as shastar vidiya, which is among the most intimidating and brutal martial art. The compositions from the Sri Dasam Granth are used in unison with the battle maneuvers. In modern times the Rastafari movement has embraced Cannabis as a sacrament. Elders of the Ethiopian Zion Coptic Church, a religious movement founded in the US in 1975 with no ties to either Ethiopia or the Coptic Church, consider Cannabis to be the Eucharist, claiming it as an oral tradition from Ethiopia dating back to the time of Christ. Like the Rastafari, some modern Gnostic Christian sects have asserted that Cannabis is the Tree of Life. Other organized religions founded in the 20th century that treat Cannabis as a sacrament are the THC Ministry, the Way of Infinite Harmony, Cantheism, the Cannabis Assembly and the Church of Cognizance. Rastafari and Sikh use tend to be among the biggest consumers of modern Cannabis use.
    Links: Cannabis, Top 100 Cannabis Strains, Great Bob Marley Songs, Great Jimi Hendrix Songs, Great Peter Tosh Songs, Top Ten Songs to Spark Up To, Top 100 Symbols, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis,
  6. Asparagus
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    Asparagus officinalis is a spring vegetable, a flowering perennial plant species in the genus Asparagus. It was once classified in the lily family, like its Allium cousins, onions and garlic, but the Liliaceae have been split and the onion-like plants are now in the family Amaryllidaceae and asparagus in the Asparagaceae. Asparagus officinalis is native to most of Europe, northern Africa and western Asia, and is widely cultivated as a vegetable crop. Recent studies suggest that Asparagus has the ability to cure forms of cancer when taken twice daily. For more on this check out the links below.
    Links: http://www.goodhealthwellnessblog.com/210/asparagus-cures-cancer/,
  7. Tumeric
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           “Anti-Oxidant/Anti-Inflammatory. A plant native to South India and Indonesia, if you like curry or mustard, you’re already familiar with this yellow food. What you might not know is that turmeric — due in large part to curcumin, tumeric’s primary active ingredient — is one of the most powerful anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatories on the planet. The majority of foods we eat, including low fat diets, promote arterial inflammation, which is a leading (and often underrated) cause of heart disease. In the fitness context, exercise-induced physiological stress causes inflammation, which impedes muscular repair. In a general sense, the more quickly the inflammation subsides, the more quickly one recovers from training. Foods like turmeric reduce inflammation, thus expediting recovery (and circulatory health). Extrapolated over time, an athlete on a nutritional regimen high in anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatory foods such as turmeric (buttressed by a predominantly alkaline-forming diet) will in turn be able to train harder, more effectively and more efficiently in a given time period while simultaneously taking out an insurance policy against the primary culprits that foil even the most conscientious athletes — undue fatigue, overtraining and illness. Furthermore, it’s worth noting that there is some evidence to suggest that people who eat diets rich in turmeric have lower rates of breast, prostate, lung, colon and skin cancers. Curcumin can be taken in capsule form, but it is not the most bio-available substance in extract form. Personally, I prefer to drink turmeric in a tea – 1/2 spoonful dissolved in hot water does the trick.” — Tim Ferris
    Links: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2012/05/23/10-uncommon-superfoods-from-the-world-of-ultra-endurance/,
  8. Kale
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           Kale or borecole is a form of cabbage (Brassica oleracea Acephala Group), green or purple, in which the central leaves do not form a head. It is considered to be closer to wild cabbage than most domesticated forms. The species Brassica oleracea contains a wide array of vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens and brussels sprouts. The cultivar group Acephala also includes spring greens and collard greens, which are extremely similar genetically. Kale is very high in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, lutein, zeaxanthin, and reasonably rich in calcium. Kale, as with broccoli and other brassicas, contains sulforaphane (particularly when chopped or minced), a chemical with potent anti-cancer properties. Boiling decreases the level of sulforaphane; however, steaming, microwaving, or stir frying do not result in significant loss. Along with other brassica vegetables, kale is also a source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells. Kale is also a good source of carotenoids.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kale,
  9. Broccoli

           Broccoli is a plant in the cabbage family, whose large flower head is used as a vegetable. The word broccoli, from the Italian plural of broccolo, refers to “the flowering top of a cabbage.” Broccoli is usually boiled or steamed, but may be eaten raw and has become popular as a raw vegetable in hors d’œuvre trays. Broccoli most closely resembles cauliflower, which is a different cultivar group of the same species. Broccoli was derived from cultivated leafy cole crops in the Northern Mediterranean in about the 6th century BC. Since the Roman Empire, broccoli has been considered a uniquely valuable food among Italians. Broccoli was brought to England from Antwerp in the mid-1700’s by Peter Scheemakers and was first introduced to the US by Italian immigrants, not becoming widely known until the 1920’s. Broccoli is high in vitamin C, as well as dietary fiber; it also contains multiple nutrients with potent anti-cancer properties, such as diindolylmethane and small amounts of selenium. A single serving provides more than 30 mg of Vitamin C and a half-cup provides 52 mg of Vitamin C. The 3,3′-Diindolylmethane found in broccoli is a potent modulator of the innate immune response system with anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity. Broccoli also contains the compound glucoraphanin, which can be processed into an anti-cancer compound sulforaphane, though the benefits of broccoli are greatly reduced if the vegetable is boiled. Broccoli is also an excellent source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells. Boiling broccoli reduces the levels of suspected anti-carcinogenic compounds, such as sulforaphane, with losses of 20–30% after 5 minutes, 40–50% after 10 minutes, and 77% after 30 minutes. However, other preparation methods such as steaming, microwaving, and stir frying had no significant effect on the compounds. Broccoli has the highest levels of carotenoids in the brassica family. It is particularly rich in lutein and also provides a modest amount of beta-carotene. A high intake of broccoli has been found to reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Broccoli consumption may also help prevent heart disease.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broccoli,
  10. Shitake Mushrooms

           
    The Shiitake (Lentinula edodes) is an edible mushroom native to East Asia, which is cultivated and consumed in many Asian countries, as well as being dried and exported to many countries around the world. It is a feature of many Asian cuisines including Vietnamese, Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Thai. In the East, the shiitake mushroom has long been considered a delicacy as well as a medicinal mushroom. Modern research has indicated shiitake mushroom may stimulate the immune system, possess antibacterial properties, reduce platelet aggregation, and possess antiviral properties, possibly through antiviral agents known as proteinase inhibitors. Active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is an α-glucan-rich compound isolated from shiitake. In Japan, AHCC is the 2nd most popular complementary and alternative medicine used by cancer patients and is metabolized via the CYP450 2D6 pathway. Research using animal models has shown that AHCC may increase the body’s resistance to pathogens as shown in experiments with the influenza virus, West Nile encephalitis virus and bacterial infection. Animal research and limited clinical trials suggest that AHCC may enhance immune function. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 21 people supported the idea that AHCC may enhance immune function. Studies have shown that AHCC may benefit patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and prostate cancer. Lentinan, a compound isolated from shiitake, is used as an intravenous anticancer agent in some countries. Studies have demonstrated lentinan possesses antitumor properties, and clinical studies have associated lentinan with a higher survival rate, higher quality of life, and lower recurrence of cancer.
    Links: Top Ten MushroomsTop Ten Asian Recipeshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shitake_mushroom,
  11. Allium Family: Garlic, Onions, Leeks and Chives

    Garlic, onions, leeks and chives contain flavonoids that stimulate the production of glutathione (the tripeptide that is the liver’s most potent antioxidant). Glutathione enhances elimination of toxins and carcinogens, putting the allium family of vegetables at the top of the list for foods that can help prevent cancer. Here are just a few benefits from members of this family.
    Garlic:
    – Lowers total cholesterol (but raises HDL—”good”—cholesterol)
    – Lessens the risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries)
    – Lowers blood pressure
    – Reduces the risk of blood clots (cause of the majority of strokes and heart attacks)
    – Destroys infection-causing viruses and bacteria
    – Reduces the risk of certain cancers, in particular, stomach cancers
    – Produces more “natural killer” cells in the blood to fight tumors and infections
    – Helps fight against neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s
    – Enhances detoxification by reducing toxins
    – For optimum effect, eat garlic raw. Cooking can destroy some of the allicin compound, which is the active constituent.
    Links: http://www.oprah.com/health/The-Allium-Family-Dr-Perricones-No-2-Superfood#ixzz2cjyOiXIm,
  12. Apple Seeds
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    Apple Seeds contain B17 (Laetrile), which helps eliminate cancerous cells.
    Links: Top Ten Apples,
  13. Soursop
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           Soursop is the fruit of Annona muricata, a broadleaf, flowering, evergreen tree native to Mexico, Cuba, Central America, the Caribbean, and northern South America, primarily Colombia, Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela. Soursop is also produced in some parts of Africa, Southeast Asia and the Pacific. The flavor has been described as a combination of strawberry and pineapple, with sour citrus flavor notes contrasting with an underlying creamy flavor reminiscent of coconut or banana. Soursop is widely promoted as an alternative cancer treatment.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soursop,
  14. Tomato

           The word “tomato” may refer to the plant (Solanum lycopersicum) or the edible, typically red, fruit that it bears. Originating in South America, the tomato was spread around the world following the Spanish colonization of the Americas, and its many varieties are now widely grown, often in greenhouses in cooler climates. The tomato fruit is consumed in diverse ways, including raw, as an ingredient in many dishes and sauces, and in drinks. While it is botanically a fruit, it is considered a vegetable for culinary purposes. Tomatoes contain the carotene lycopene, one of the most powerful natural antioxidants. In some studies, lycopene, especially in cooked tomatoes, has been found to help prevent prostate cancer. Lycopene has also been shown to improve the skin’s ability to protect against harmful UV rays. A study done by researchers at Manchester and Newcastle universities revealed that tomato can protect against sunburn and help keeping the skin looking youthful. Natural genetic variation in tomatoes and their wild relatives has given a genetic plethora of genes that produce lycopene, carotene, anthocyanin, and other antioxidants. Tomato varieties are available with double the normal vitamin C (Doublerich), 40 times normal vitamin A (97L97), high levels of anthocyanin (resulting in blue tomatoes), and two to four times the normal amount of lycopene (numerous available cultivars with the high crimson gene). Tomato consumption has also been associated with decreased risk of breast cancer, head and neck cancers and might be strongly protective against neurodegenerative diseases. Tomatoes and tomato sauces and puree are said to help lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH) and may have anticancer properties. Tomato consumption might be beneficial for reducing cardiovascular risk associated with type 2 diabetes.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomatoe,
  15. Strawberry
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    Fragaria × ananassa, commonly known as strawberry, is a hybrid species that first bred in Brittany, France, in the 1750’s via a cross of Fragaria virginiana from eastern North America and Fragaria chiloensis, which was brought from Chile by Amédée-François Frézier in 1714. One cup (236 g) of strawberries contains approximately 45 kilo-calories (188 kJ) and is an excellent source of vitamin C and flavonoids. This fruit is very low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. It is also a good source of folate and potassium, and a very good source of dietary fiber, and manganese One serving of about eight strawberries provides more vitamin C than an orange. The strawberry is among the top 20 fruits in antioxidant capacity.
    Links: Top Ten Antioxidants, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strawberry,
  16. Cassava
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    ‘Manihot esculenta,’ also called Cassava, manioc, yuca, balinghoy, mogo, mandioca, kamoteng kahoy, tapioca (predominantly in India) and manioc root, a woody shrub of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge) family native to South America, is extensively cultivated as an annual crop in tropical and subtropical regions for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrates. Cassava contains B17 (laetrile), which helps eliminate cancerous cells but must be properly prepared before consumption, as it can leave enough residual cyanide to cause acute cyanide intoxication and goiters, and may even cause ataxia or partial paralysis if not properly prepared.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassava,
  17. Peppers

    The term “peppers” encompasses a diverse group of plants, ranging from the popular sweet green or red bell pepper to the fiery hot habañero or the even more lethal Scotch bonnet. When Columbus tasted the small, hot red “berries” he found on his Caribbean voyages, he believed he had reached India, where Europeans obtained black pepper, and called them red pepper. In truth, the native peoples of the Americas had been growing and enjoying sweet and chili peppers for an estimated 7,000 years. Soon after Columbus’s ships brought them back to Spain, traders spread them around the world, transforming cuisines, and people’s preventive health prospects, from Morocco to Hungary, and India to China. Peppers, whether sweet bell or hot chili, are members of the plant genus “capsicum,” a term that comes from the Greek word kapto, which means “to bite.” All peppers contain compounds called capsaicinoids. This is especially true of chili peppers, which derive their spicy heat—as well as extraordinary anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-cancer, heart-healthy effects, from very high levels of capsaicinoids, the most common form of which is capsaicin. In addition to capsaicin, chilies are high in antioxidant carotenes and flavonoids, and contain about twice the amount of vitamin C found in citrus fruits. Almost any dish, from homemade soups, stews and chili to stir-fries, salads and salsas, can benefit from small amounts of hot peppers.
    Links: http://www.oprah.com/health/Hot-Peppers-Dr-Perricones-Superfood-No-7-Superfood#ixzz2cjxYUM7m,
  18. Cashews
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           The cashew is a tree in the family Anacardiaceae. Its English name derives from the Portuguese name for the fruit of the cashew tree, caju, which in turn derives from the indigenous Tupi name, acajú. Originally native to Northeast Brazil, it is now widely grown in tropical climates for its cashew seeds and cashew apples. The fats and oils in cashew nuts are 54% monounsaturated fat (18:1), 18% polyunsaturated fat (18:2), and 16% saturated fat (9% palmitic acid (16:0) and 7% stearic acid (18:0)). Cashews, as with other tree nuts, are a good source of antioxidants. Alkyl phenols, in particular, are abundant in cashews. Cashews are also a good source of dietary trace minerals copper, iron and zinc. The cashew nutshell liquid (CNSL), a byproduct of processing cashew, is mostly composed of anacardic acids (70%), cardol (18%) and cardanol (5%). These acids have been used effectively against tooth abscesses due to their lethality to a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria. Many parts of the plant are used by the Patamona of Guyana medicinally. The bark is scraped and soaked overnight or boiled as an antidiarrheal; it also yields a gum used in varnish. Seeds are ground into powders used for antivenom for snake bites. The nut oil is used topically as an antifungal and for healing cracked heels.
    Links:
  19. Tulsi
    File:Starr 080117-1577 Ocimum tenuiflorum.jpgFile:Ocimum tenuiflorum.jpg
    Ocimum tenuiflorum, also known as Holy Basil, tulsi, or tulasī, is an aromatic plant in the family Lamiaceae which is native throughout the Eastern World tropics and widespread as a cultivated plant and an escaped weed. It is an erect, much branched subshrub, 30–60 cm tall with hairy stems and simple, opposite, green leaves that are strongly scented. Leaves have petioles, and are ovate, up to 5 cm long, usually slightly toothed. The flowers are purplish in elongate racemes in close whorls. The two main morphotypes cultivated in India and Nepal are green-leaved (Sri or Lakshmi tulsi) and purple-leaved (Krishna tulsi). Tulsi is cultivated for religious and medicinal purposes, and for its essential oil. It is widely known across South Asia as a medicinal plant and an herbal tea, commonly used in Ayurveda, and has an important role within the Vaishnavite tradition of Hinduism, in which devotees perform worship involving holy basil plants or leaves. The variety of Ocimum tenuiflorum used in Thai cuisine is referred to as Thai holy basil. A variety of in vitro studies and animal studies have indicated some potential pharmacological properties of Ocimum tenuiflorum or its extracts. Recent studies suggest tulasi may be a COX-2 inhibitor, like many modern painkillers, due to its high concentration of eugenol. One small study showed it to reduce blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetics when combined with hypoglycemic drugs. The same study showed significant reduction in total cholesterol levels with tulsi. Another study showed its beneficial effect on blood glucose levels is due to its antioxidant properties. Tulasi also shows some promise for protection from radiation poisoning and cataracts. It has anti-oxidant properties and can repair cells damaged by exposure to radiation. The fixed oil has demonstrated antihyperlipidemic and cardioprotective effects in rats fed a high fat diet. A double-blind trial conducted in 2011 suggested that an alcoholic extract of tulsi modulates immunity, thus promoting immune system function. β-Elemene has been studied for its potential anticancer properties, but human clinical trials have yet to confirm its effectiveness. Isolated O. sanctum extracts have some antibacterial activity against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulsi,
  20. Avocado
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           The avocado (Persea americana) is a tree native to Central Mexico, classified in the flowering plant family Lauraceae along with cinnamon, camphor and bay laurel. Avocado or alligator pear also refers to the fruit (botanically a large berry that contains a single seed) of the tree, which may be pear-shaped, egg-shaped or spherical. Avocados are commercially valuable and are cultivated in tropical and Mediterranean climates throughout the world. They have a green-skinned, pear-shaped fleshy body that ripens after harvesting. Trees are partially self-pollinating and often are propagated through grafting to maintain a predictable quality and quantity of the fruit. The fruit is not sweet, but fatty, and distinctly yet subtly flavored, and of smooth, almost creamy texture. It is used in both savory and sweet dishes, though in many countries not for both. The avocado is very popular in vegetarian cuisine, as substitute for meats in sandwiches and salads because of its high fat content. Avocados have diverse fats. For a typical avocado: About 75% of an avocado’s calories come from fat, most of which is monounsaturated fat. On a 100 g basis, avocados have 35% more potassium (485 mg) than bananas (358 mg). They are rich in B vitamins, as well as vitamin E and vitamin K. Avocados also have a high fiber content of 75% insoluble and 25% soluble fiber. High avocado intake was shown in one preliminary study to lower blood cholesterol levels. Specifically, after a seven-day diet rich in avocados, mild hypercholesterolemia patients showed a 17% decrease in total serum cholesterol levels. These subjects also showed a 22% decrease in both LDL (harmful cholesterol) and triglyceride levels and 11% increase in HDL (helpful cholesterol) levels. Additionally a Japanese team synthesized the four chiral components, and identified (2R, 4R)-16-heptadecene-1, 2, 4-triol as a natural antibacterial component. Due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins, avocado is under preliminary research for potential anti-cancer activity. Extracts of P. americana have been used in laboratory research to study potential use for treating hypertension or diabetes mellitus.
    Links: Top Ten Avocado RecipesTop Ten Aphrodisiacshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avocado,
  21. Links: Top Ten Antioxidants, Top Ten Superfoods, Top Ten Medicinal Herbshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anticarcinogenic,

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