Top Ten Plant Fats

Top Ten Plant Fats

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  1. Savi Seeds
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           These little gems are the highest source of omega-3 on the planet… 17 times more than wild salmon! By eating the entire seed you also get beneficial plant-based protein and fiber. SaviSeeds are a satisfying snack and a great way to increase the amount of essential omega-3 fatty acids in your diet.
    Links: 
    http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,
  2. Hemp Seeds
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    Rich in both essential fatty acids: omega-6 and omega-3 hemp seeds have an ideal ratio of the two omegas (3:1). Sprinkle raw hemp seeds on salads and soups to inject some of these healthy fats into your diet. Your Body will love you for it.
    Links: Cannabis, http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,
  3. Chia Seeds (Runner’s Fuel)

    Salvia hispanica, commonly known as chia or runner’s fuel, is a species of flowering plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native to central and southern Mexico and Guatemala. The 16th century Codex Mendoza provides evidence that it was cultivated by the Aztec in pre-Columbian times; economic historians have suggested that it was as important as maize as a food crop. Chia is grown commercially for its seed, a food that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids. One pilot study found that 10 weeks ingestion of 25 grams per day of milled chia seeds, produced high blood levels of alpha-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 long-chain fatty acid considered good for the heart, while having no effect on inflammation or disease risk factors. According to the USDA, a one ounce (28 gram) serving of chia seeds contains 9 grams of fat, 5 milligrams of sodium, 11 grams of dietary fiber and 4 grams of protein. The seeds also have 18% of the recommended daily intake of calcium, 27% phosphorus and 30% manganese, similar in nutrient content to other edible seeds such as flax or sesame. The seeds are often consumed by runners before marathons and long distance events as it improves endurance. Chia seeds may be added to other foods as a topping or put into smoothies, breakfast cereals, energy bars, yogurt, made into a gelatin-like substance, or consumed raw.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chia_seeds,
  4. Walnuts
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    Walnuts are an excellent source of anti-inflammatory omega-3 essential fatty acids, in the form of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Walnuts are also rich in antioxidants and a very good source of manganese and copper. Other minerals provided by walnuts include calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, vanadium, zinc and some vitamin B6 in limited amounts. Walnuts also contain antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds.
    Links: http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,
  5. Coconut Oil/Butter
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    Historically, coconut oil was thought to be unhealthy because it is high in saturated fat. We now know that it is actually rich in medium chain triglycerides which are readily burned for fuel in the liver, bypassing fat storage. Always look for virgin coconut oil instead of refined versions (which can be partially or fully hydrogenated, thereby eliminating any positive health benefits). Coconut oil can also withstand high heats without oxidizing – making it an ideal cooking oil for any frying you need to do.
    Links: http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,
  6. Avocado
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           The avocado (Persea americana) is a tree native to Central Mexico, classified in the flowering plant family Lauraceae along with cinnamon, camphor and bay laurel. Avocado or alligator pear also refers to the fruit (botanically a large berry that contains a single seed) of the tree, which may be pear-shaped, egg-shaped or spherical. Avocados are commercially valuable and are cultivated in tropical and Mediterranean climates throughout the world. They have a green-skinned, pear-shaped fleshy body that ripens after harvesting. Trees are partially self-pollinating and often are propagated through grafting to maintain a predictable quality and quantity of the fruit. The fruit is not sweet, but fatty, and distinctly yet subtly flavored, and of smooth, almost creamy texture. It is used in both savory and sweet dishes, though in many countries not for both. The avocado is very popular in vegetarian cuisine, as substitute for meats in sandwiches and salads because of its high fat content. Avocados have diverse fats. For a typical avocado: About 75% of an avocado’s calories come from fat, most of which is monounsaturated fat. On a 100 g basis, avocados have 35% more potassium (485 mg) than bananas (358 mg). They are rich in B vitamins, as well as vitamin E and vitamin K. Avocados also have a high fiber content of 75% insoluble and 25% soluble fiber. High avocado intake was shown in one preliminary study to lower blood cholesterol levels. Specifically, after a seven-day diet rich in avocados, mild hypercholesterolemia patients showed a 17% decrease in total serum cholesterol levels. These subjects also showed a 22% decrease in both LDL (harmful cholesterol) and triglyceride levels and 11% increase in HDL (helpful cholesterol) levels. Additionally a Japanese team synthesized the four chiral components, and identified (2R, 4R)-16-heptadecene-1, 2, 4-triol as a natural antibacterial component. Due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins, avocado is under preliminary research for potential anti-cancer activity. Extracts of P. americana have been used in laboratory research to study potential use for treating hypertension or diabetes mellitus.
    Links: Top Ten Avocado Recipes, Top Ten Aphrodisiacs, Top Ten Anticarcinogens,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avocado,
  7. Almonds
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    Rich in protein and monounsaturated fat, just one ounce of almonds also provides 35% of your daily needs of antioxidant vitamin E. Swap out your peanut butter for almond butter without sacrificing the nutty taste.
    Links: Top Ten Nuts, http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,
  8. Sunflower Seeds
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    These tiny seeds are acceptable forms of monounsaturated fat if you are allergic to nuts. Plus, they pack a good punch of vitamins and minerals, including manganese, magnesium, copper, selenium, phosphorus, vitamin B1, vitamin B6 and folate.
    Links: http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,
  9. Brazil Nuts
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    Not only are Brazil nuts a source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fat but they are rich in the antioxidant mineral selenium, which provides a powerful defense against free radical damage.
    Links: http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,
  10. Cocoa Nibs
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    Take cocoa beans, roast them, break them into small pieces and you have cacao nibs. They provide a healthy dose of monounsaturated fat, magnesium and antioxidants as well as serving to satisfy your sweet tooth. Add them to oatmeal, smoothies or fruit!
    Links: http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,
  11. Kale
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           Kale or borecole is a form of cabbage (Brassica oleracea Acephala Group), green or purple, in which the central leaves do not form a head. It is considered to be closer to wild cabbage than most domesticated forms. The species Brassica oleracea contains a wide array of vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens and brussels sprouts. The cultivar group Acephala also includes spring greens and collard greens, which are extremely similar genetically. Kale is very high in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, lutein, zeaxanthin, and reasonably rich in calcium. Kale, as with broccoli and other brassicas, contains sulforaphane (particularly when chopped or minced), a chemical with potent anti-cancer properties. Boiling decreases the level of sulforaphane; however, steaming, microwaving, or stir frying do not result in significant loss. Along with other brassica vegetables, kale is also a source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells. Kale is also a good source of carotenoids.
    Links: Top Ten Anticarcinogens, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kale,
  12. Olives
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    The olive is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, native to the coastal areas of the eastern Mediterranean Basin as well as northern Iraq, and northern Iran at the south of the Caspian Sea.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olives#Cultivation_and_uses,
  13. Flax Seeds
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    Flax is a food and fiber crop that is grown in cooler regions of the world. Flax fibres are taken from the stem of the plant and are two to three times as strong as those of cotton. As well, flax fibers are naturally smooth and straight. Europe and North America depended on flax for vegetable-based cloth until the 19th century, when cotton overtook flax as the most common plant used for making linen paper. It is native to the region extending from the eastern Mediterranean to India and was probably first domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. Flax was extensively cultivated in ancient China and ancient Egypt. Most types have similar nutritional characteristics and equal numbers of short-chain omega-3 fatty acids.

    Links: Top Ten Seeds, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flax_seeds,
  14. Soybeans (Tofu and Tempeh)
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    The soybean is a species of legume native to East Asia, widely grown for its edible bean which has numerous uses. Soybeans produce significantly more protein per acre than most other uses of land. Traditional nonfermented food uses of soybeans include soy milk, and from the latter tofu and tofu skin. Fermented foods include soy sauce, fermented bean paste, natto, and tempeh, among others. The oil is used in many industrial applications. The beans contain significant amounts of phytic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, isoflavones and has a fat content of roughly 20%. Soybeans are also considered by many agencies to be a source of complete protein. A complete protein is one that contains significant amounts of all the essential amino acids that must be provided to the human body because of the body’s inability to synthesize them.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soy,
  15. Pumpkin and Sesame Seeds
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    Pepita is a Spanish culinary term for the pumpkin seed, the edible seed of a pumpkin or other cultivar of squash (genus Cucurbita). The seeds are typically rather flat and asymmetrically oval, and light green in color inside a white hull. The seeds have a 50% fat content and are also good sources of protein, as well as iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and potassium. 25 grams of pepitas can provide over 20 percent of the recommended daily iron intake. Furthermore, just one-fourth cup of pepitas provides approximately 185 mg of magnesium, nearly 50% of the Recommended Daily Intake.  Sesame is a flowering plant in the genus Sesamum with wild relatives occurring in Africa and a smaller number in India. Sesame seed is one of the oldest oilseed crops known, domesticated well over 3,000 years ago. It was a major summer crop in the Middle East for thousands of years, as attested to by the discovery of many ancient presses for sesame oil in the region. Sesame has one of the highest oil contents of any seed and has a fat content of 61%.
    Links: Top Ten Seeds,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumpkin_seedshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sesame_seeds,
  16. Safflower
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    Safflower is a highly branched, herbaceous, thistle-like annual plant. It is commercially cultivated for vegetable oil extracted from the seeds. Safflower is native to arid environments having seasonal rain. It grows a deep taproot which enables it to thrive in such environments. There are two types of safflower that produce different kinds of oil: one high in monounsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid) and the other high in polyunsaturated fatty acid (linoleic acid).
    Links: Top 100 Flowershttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safflower,
  17. Links: Health, Top Ten Superfoods, thriveforward.com, http://thriveforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/05-Macronutrients-2-Ref-Top-Ten-Healthy-Fats.pdf,