Top Ten Bissau-Guinean Attractions

Top Ten Bissau-Guinean Attractions

       The Republic of Guinea-Bissau is a country in West Africa bordered by Senegal, Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean to its west. It covers 36,125 square km (nearly 14,000 sq mi) with an estimated population of 1,600,000. Guinea-Bissau was once part of the kingdom of Gabu, as well as part of the Mali Empire. Parts of this kingdom persisted until the 18th century, while a few others were part of the Portuguese Empire since the 16th century. It then became the Portuguese colony of Portuguese Guinea in the 19th century. Upon independence, declared in 1973 and recognized in 1974, the name of its capital, Bissau, was added to the country’s name to prevent confusion with the Republic of Guinea. Only 14% of the population speaks the official language, Portuguese. The majority of the population (44%) speaks Kriol, a Portuguese-based Creole language and the remainder speak native African languages. The main religions are African traditional religions and Islam, and there is a Christian (mostly Catholic) minority. The country’s per-capita gross domestic product is one of the lowest in the world.

  1. Bissau
    File:Bissau city center.jpgFile:Guinea-bissau-bissau-1.jpgFile:Bissau monument.jpg
    Bissau is the capital city of Guinea-Bissau. The city’s borders are conterminous with the Bissau Autonomous Sector. In 2007, the city had an estimated population of 407,424 according to the Instituto Nacional de Estatística e Censos. The city which is located on the Geba River estuary, off the Atlantic Ocean, is the country’s largest city, major port, administrative and military center.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bissau,
  2. Cacheu

           Cacheu is a town in northwestern Guinea-Bissau, lying on the Cacheu River. Its population was estimated to be 9,849 as of 2008. The town of Cacheu is situated in territory of the Papel people. Cacheu was one of the earliest European colonial settlements in sub-saharan Africa, due to its strategic location on the Cacheu river. Cacheu developed a European/Afro-European population from the late 15th century through informal settlement of Cape Verdian and Portuguese traders, adventurers and outcasts (lancados). The authorities in mainland Portugal also sent to Cacheu degredados – people condemned to exile for a variety of offences. For most of the 17th and 18th centuries, Cacheu was the official slave trading point for the Portuguese in the Upper Guinea region – the point at which duties on all slaves exported had to be paid. Notable buildings in Cacheu include the Portuguese-built 16th century fort, dating from the period when Cacheu was a centre for the slave trade. Roads in the town are paved with oil palm kernels. Other attractions in the town include the Tarafes de Cacheu Natural Park mangrove swamp and a regular market.
    Links: Sculptures, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cacheu,
  3. Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guinea-Bissau,