Top Ten Burkinabé Attractions

Top Ten Burkinabé Attractions

       Burkina Faso is a landlocked country in west Africa. It is surrounded by six countries: Mali, Niger, Benin, Togo, Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire. Its size is 274,200 square km (105,900 sq mi) with an estimated population of more than 15,757,000. Formerly called the Republic of Upper Volta, it was renamed on August 4, 1984, by President Thomas Sankara to mean “the land of upright people” in Mòoré and Dioula, the major native languages of the country. Figuratively, “Burkina” may be translated, “men of integrity,” from the Mòoré language, and “Faso” means “father’s house” in Dioula. The inhabitants of Burkina Faso are known as Burkinabè. Burkina Faso was populated between 14,000 and 5,000 BC by hunter-gatherers in the country’s northwestern region. Farm settlements appeared between 3600 and 2600 BC. What is now central Burkina Faso was principally composed of Mossi kingdoms. These Mossi Kingdoms would become a French protectorate in 1896. After gaining independence from France in 1960, the country underwent many governmental changes until arriving at its current form, a semi-presidential republic. The president is Blaise Compaoré. Burkina Faso’s capital is Ouagadougou.

  1. Ouagadougou

    Ouagadougou is the capital of Burkina Faso and the administrative, communications, cultural and economic center of the nation. It is also the country’s largest city, with a population of 1,475,223 (2006). The spelling of the name Ouagadougou is derived from the French orthography common in former French African colonies. If English orthography were used (as in Ghana or Nigeria), the spelling would be Wagadugu. Ouagadougou’s primary industries are food processing and textiles. It is served by an international airport, rail links to Abidjan in Côte d’Ivoire and to Kaya in the north of Burkina, and a highway to Niamey, Niger. Ouagadougou was the site of Ouagadougou grand market, one of the largest markets in West Africa, which burned in 2003 and remains closed. Other attractions include the National Museum of Burkina Faso, the Moro-Naba Palace (site of the Moro-Naba Ceremony), the National Museum of Music and several craft markets.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouagadougou,
  2. Loropéni

    Loropéni is a market town in southern Burkina Faso, lying west of Gaoua. Local features include pre-European stone ruins, about which little is known. One theory is that they formed the enclosure of the courtyard of a Kaan Iya (king or paramount ruler of the Kaan people) from antiquity. There is a similar, though much-degraded ruin around the current royal courtyard in Obiré. Another theory is that the ruins may have been a slave holding site for slave raids in the area. Surrounded by mystery, the 11,130 square m property is made up of an array of stone walls. Loropéni is the best preserved example of a type of fortified settlement in a wide part of West Africa, linked to the tradition of gold mining, which seems to have persisted through at least 7 centuries. Loropéni, given its size and scope reflects a type of structure quite different from the walled towns of what is now Nigeria, or the cities of the upper reaches of the river Niger which flourished as part of the Empires of Ghana, Mali and Songhai. It thus can be seen as an exceptional testimony to the settlement response generated by the gold trade.
    Links: Sculptures, Top 100 Gold Artifacts, Top 100 Gold Coins, Top Ten Slaves, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorop%C3%A9ni,
  3. Grand Mosque of Bobo-Dioulasso

    Description:
    Links:
  4. Links: Attractions, African Attractions, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burkina_Faso,