Top Ten Czech Attractions

Top Ten Czech Attractions

Czech RepublicKutná Hora3Czech Republic1Czech Republic2

       The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in Central Europe. The country is bordered by Germany, Poland, Austria and Slovakia. Its capital and largest city is Prague with 1.3 million inhabitants. It is a pluralist multi-party parliamentary representative democracy, a member of the European Union, NATO, the OECD, the OSCE, the Council of Europe and the Visegrád Group. The Czech state, formerly known as Bohemia, was formed in the late 9th century as a small duchy around Prague, at that time under dominance of the powerful Great Moravian Empire, which reached its greatest territorial extent during the reign of Svatopluk I from the House of Mojmír. After the fall of the Empire in 907, the center of power was transferred from Moravia to Bohemia, under the Přemyslids. During the rule of Přemyslid dukes/kings and their successors, the Luxembourgs, the country reached its greatest territorial extent (13th–14th century). Life in the country was significantly affected by the Hussite wars, during which it faced economic embargo and crusades from all over Europe. Following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, the Crown of Bohemia was gradually integrated into the Habsburg monarchy as one of its three principal parts alongside the Archduchy of Austria and the Kingdom of Hungary. The Bohemian Revolt (1618–20) led to the further centralization of the monarchy including forced recatholization and Germanization. During radical reforms in the 18th century the Bohemian Crown was even de facto abolished (1749). In the 19th century the Czech lands became the industrial powerhouse of the monarchy and the core of the Republic of Czechoslovakia which was formed in 1918, following the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian empire after WWI. After the Munich Agreement, Polish annexation of Zaolzie and German occupation of Czechoslovakia and the consequent disillusion with the Western response and gratitude for the liberation of the major portion of Czechoslovakia by the Red Army, the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia won the majority in the 1946 elections. In a 1948 coup d’état, Czechoslovakia became a communist-ruled state. In 1968, the increasing dissatisfaction culminated in attempts to reform the communist regime. The events, known as the Prague Spring of 1968, ended with an invasion by the armies of the Warsaw Pact countries (with the exception of Romania); the troops remained in the country until the 1989 Velvet Revolution, when the communist regime collapsed. On January 1, 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully dissolved into its constituent states, the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic. The Czech Republic is the first former member of the Comecon to achieve the status of a developed country according to the World Bank. In addition, the country has the highest human development in Central and Eastern Europe, ranking as a “Very High Human Development” nation. It is also ranked as the 3rd most peaceful country in Europe and most democratic and healthy (by infant mortality) country in the region.

  1. Prague
    PraguePrague1Prague2Prague3Prague4Prague5Prague6Prague7Prague8
    Prague is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. Situated in the north-west of the country on the Vltava River, the city is home to about 1.3 million people, while its metropolitan area is estimated to have a population of nearly 2.0 million. The city has a temperate oceanic climate with warm summers and chilly winters. Prague has been a political, cultural, and economic center of central Europe with waxing and waning fortunes during its 1,100 year existence. Founded during the Gothic and flourishing by the Renaissance eras, Prague was the seat of two Holy Roman Emperors and thus then also the capital of the Holy Roman Empire. It was an important city to the Habsburg Monarchy and its Austro-Hungarian Empire and after WWI became the capital of Czechoslovakia. The city played major roles in the Protestant Reformation, the Thirty Years’ War, and in modern history generally as the principal conurbation in Bohemia and Moravia whose second city is Brno. Prague is home to a number of famous cultural attractions, many of which survived the violence and destruction of 20th century Europe. Main attractions include the following: Prague Castle, the Charles Bridge, Old Town Square, the Jewish Quarter, the Lennon Wall, and Petřín hill. Prague boasts more than ten major museums, along with countless theatres, galleries, cinemas, and other historical exhibits. A modern public transportation system connects the city. Prague is classified as a Beta+ global city according to GaWC studies, comparable to Berlin, Rome, or Houston. Its rich history makes it a popular tourist destination, and the city receives more than 4.1 million international visitors annually, as of 2009. In 2011 Prague was the 6th most visited city in Europe
    Links: Top Ten Prague Hotels, Top Ten Prague Restaurants, Cities, Castles, Top Ten Bridges, Top Ten Concert Halls, Top Ten Squares, Top Ten Walls, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prague,
  2. Brno
    BrnoBrno1Brno2Brno3Brno4Brno5Brno6Brno7Brno8Brno9
    Brno by population and area is the 2nd largest city in the Czech Republic, the largest Moravian city, and the historical capital city of the Margraviate of Moravia. Brno is the administrative center of the South Moravian Region where it forms a separate district Brno-City District. The city lies at the confluence of the Svitava and Svratka rivers and has over 400,000 residents, while its greater metropolitan area is regularly home to more than 800,000 people. Brno is the capital of judicial authority of the Czech Republic because it is the seat of the Constitutional Court, the Supreme Court, the Supreme Administrative Court, and the Supreme Prosecutor’s Office. Brno is also an important center of higher education, with 33 faculties of 13 universities and about 89,000 students. Brno Exhibition Center ranks among the largest exhibition centers in Europe, this huge complex first started functioning in 1928 and established the tradition of large exhibitions and trade fairs held in Brno, now it also ranks among one of the sights of the city. The city is also known for hosting big motorbike and other races on the Masaryk Circuit, this tradition was established in 1930 and the most prestigious races include the Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix. Another notable cultural tradition includes an international fireworks competition Ignis Brunensis, this event usually attracts one or two hundred thousand visitors every day it’s being held. The most important sights of the city include the castle and fortress Špilberk and the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul on Petrov hill; these two formerly medieval buildings form the characteristic cityscape and are often depicted as its traditional symbols. The other large and preserved castle in the city is Veveří Castle near the Brno Dam Lake, this castle is a subject for a couple of legends like a number of other places in Brno. Another important monument of Brno is the functionalist Villa Tugendhat. Brno is surrounded by a relatively pleasant nature, one of the especially attractive areas nearby might be the Moravian Karst.
    Links: Castles, Top Ten Theatres, Top Ten Fireworks Shows, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brno,
  3. Český Krumlov
    Český KrumlovČeský Krumlov1Český Krumlov2Český Krumlov3Český Krumlov4Český Krumlov5Český Krumlov6Český Krumlov7Český Krumlov8Český Krumlov9
    Český Krumlov is a small city in the South Bohemian Region of the Czech Republic, best known for the fine architecture and art of the historic old town and Český Krumlov Castle. The city is named Český Krumlov (“Bohemian Krumlov”) to differentiate it from Moravský Krumlov (“Moravian Krumlov”) in the southeast of the country.
    Links: Top Ten Towers, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historic_Centre_of_%C4%8Cesk%C3%BD_Krumlov,
  4. Kutná Hora
    Kutná HoraKutná Hora1Kutná Hora2Kutná Hora3Kutná Hora4Kutná Hora5
    Kutná Hora is a city in Bohemia, now the Czech Republic in the Central Bohemian Region.
    Links: Churches, Top Ten Stained Glass Windows, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kutn%C3%A1_Hora,
  5. Lednice-Valtice Cultural Landscape
    Lednice-Valtice Cultural Landscape1Lednice-Valtice Cultural Landscape2Lednice-Valtice Cultural Landscape3Lednice-Valtice Cultural Landscape4Lednice-Valtice Cultural Landscape5
    The Lednice-Valtice Cultural Landscape is a cultural-natural complex of 283,09 km² in the Czech Republic, South Moravian Region, close to Břeclav and Mikulov.
    Links: Castles, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lednice-Valtice_Cultural_Landscape,
  6. Kroměříž Palace, Kroměříž, Czech Republic
    Kroměříž PalaceKroměříž Palace1Kroměříž Palace2
    The Kroměříž Palace in Kroměříž, Czech Republic, used to be the principal residence of the bishops and (since 1777) archbishops of Olomouc. The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years’ War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643). It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese’s work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese’s death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged. After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the 2nd finest in the country, which includes Titian’s last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes. As the nomination dossier explains, “the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden.” Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal 19th century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997. Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna’s Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (who actually never visited Kroměříž). The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.
    Links: Palaces, Top Ten Paintings by Titian, Top Ten Gardens,
  7. Telč
    TelčTelč1Telč2Telč3
    Telč is a town in southern Moravia, near Jihlava, in the Czech Republic. The town was founded in 13th century as a royal water fort on the crossroads of busy merchant routes between Bohemia, Moravia and Austria. Besides the monumental 17th century Renaissance chateau with an English-style park (a rebuilding of original Gothic castle), the most significant sight is the town square, a unique complex of long urban plaza with well-conserved Renaissance and Baroque houses with high gables and arcades. The Gothic castle was built in the second half of the 14th century. At the end of the 15th century the castle fortifications were strengthened and a new gate-tower built. In the middle of the 16th century the medieval castle no longer satisfied Renaissance nobleman Zachariáš of Hradec, who had the castle altered in the Renaissance style. The ground floor was vaulted anew, the facade decorated with sgraffito, and the state apartments and living quarters received stucco ornamentation together with trompe l’oeil and chiaroscuro paintings in 1553. The counter-reformation brought the Jesuits to the town, who built the church of Name of Jesus in 1666-1667, according to the plans of Domenico Orsi. The column of the Virgin and the fountain in the center of the square date from the 18th century. In 1979 Werner Herzog filmed the movie Woyzeck in Telč.
    Links: Sculptures, Top Ten Fountains, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tel%C4%8D,
  8. Litomyšl
    Litomyšl1Litomyšl2
    Litomyšl is a town and municipality in the Pardubice Region of the Czech Republic.
    Links: Castles, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Litomy%C5%A1l_Castle,
  9. Pilgrimage Church of St John of Nepomuk at Zelená Hora
    Pilgrimage Church of St John of Nepomuk at Zelená HoraPilgrimage Church of St John of Nepomuk at Zelená Hora1
    The Pilgrimage Church of St John of Nepomuk at Zelená Hora (Gruenberg) is a religious building in Ž’ár nad Sázavou, Czechia, near the border between Bohemia and Moravia. It is the final work of Jan Santini Aichel, a Bohemian architect who combined the Borrominiesque Baroque with references to Gothic elements in both construction and decoration. In 1719, when the Roman Catholic Church declared the tongue of John of Nepomuk to be “incorruptible,” work started to build a church in Zelena Hora, where the future saint had received his early education. It was consecrated immediately after John’s beatification in 1720, although construction works lumbered on until 1727. Half a century later, after a serious fire, the shape of the roof was altered. The church, with many furnishings designed by Santini himself, is remarkable for its Gothicizing features and complex symbolism, quite unusual for the time.
    Links: Churches, Top Ten Pilgrimages, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilgrimage_Church_of_St_John_of_Nepomuk_at_Zelen%C3%A1_Hora,
  10. St. Procopius Basilica
    St. Procopius Basilica
    St. Procopius Basilica is a Romanesque-Gothic Christian church in Třebíč, Czech Republic. It was built on the site of the original Virgin Mary’s Chapel of the Benedictine monastery in 1240-1280. It became a national cultural monument in 2002 as a part of the “monastery with St. Procopius church.” The basilica was originally dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. Saint Procopius became the Patron saint of the basilica on the quincentenary his canonization in 1704. Jan Karel, Count of Valdštejn established a castle chapel of St. Procopius from the presbytery of the basilica. The basilica is the parish church of Třebíč castle, by which it is owned.
    Links: Top Ten Basilicas, Castles, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Quarter_and_St_Procopius%27_Basilica_in_T%C5%99eb%C3%AD%C4%8D,
  11. The Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc
    The Holy Trinity Column in OlomoucThe Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc1The Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc2The Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc3
    The Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc is a Baroque monument in the Czech Republic, built in 1716–1754 in honor of God. The main purpose was a spectacular celebration of Catholic Church and faith, partly caused by feeling of gratitude for ending a plague, which struck Moravia (now in the Czech Republic) between 1714 and 1716. The column was also understood to be an expression of local patriotism, since all artists and master craftsmen working on this monument were Olomouc citizens, and almost all depicted saints were connected with the city of Olomouc in some way. It is the biggest Baroque sculptural group in the Czech Republic. It represents “one of the most exceptional examples of the apogee of central European Baroque artistic expression.”
    Links: Sculptures, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Column_in_Olomouc,
  12. Links: Top Ten Czech Hotels, Top Ten Czech Restaurantshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czech_Republic,

Gnosis Approved Products