Top Ten Danish Attractions

Top Ten Danish Attractions

DenmarkKronborg Castle1Kronborg Castle2Copenhagen3Denmark1

       Denmark is a Scandinavian country in Northern Europe. The countries of Denmark and Greenland, as well as the Faroe Islands, constitute the Kingdom of Denmark. It is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and bordered by Germany, the Baltic Sea and the North Sea. The country consists of a large peninsula, Jutland (Jylland) and many islands, most notably Zealand (Sjælland), Funen (Fyn), Vendsyssel-Thy (commonly considered a part of Jutland), Lolland, Falster andBornholm, as well as hundreds of minor islands often referred to as the Danish Archipelago. Denmark has long controlled the approach to the Baltic Sea; before the digging of the Kiel Canal, water passage to the Baltic Sea was possible only through the three channels known as the “Danish straits.” Denmark is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system of government. It has a state-level government and local governments in 98 municipalities. Denmark has been a member of the European Union since 1973, although it has not joined the Eurozone. Denmark, with a mixed market capitalist economy and a large welfare state, ranks as having the world’s highest level of income equality. It has frequently ranked as the happiest and least corrupt country in the world. The national language, Danish, is closely related to Swedish and Norwegian, with which it shares strong cultural and historical ties.

  1. Copenhagen
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           Copenhagen is the capital and largest city of Denmark, with an urban population of 1,199,224 (2011) and a metropolitan population of 1,919,979 (2011). With the completion of the transnational Øresund Bridge in 2000, Copenhagen has become the center of the increasingly integrating Øresund Region. Within this region, Copenhagen and the Swedish city of Malmö are growing into a combined metropolitan area. Copenhagen is situated on the islands of Zealand and Amager. First documented in the 11th century, Copenhagen became the capital of Denmark in the beginning of the 15th century. During the 17th century, under the reign of Christian IV, it became a significant regional center. Copenhagen is a major regional center of culture, business, media and science, as indicated by several international surveys and rankings. Life science, information technology and shipping are important sectors, and research and development plays a major role in the city’s economy. Its strategic location and excellent infrastructure, with the largest airport in Scandinavia located 14 minutes by train from the city center, have made it a regional hub and a popular location for regional headquarters and conventions. Copenhagen has repeatedly been recognized as one of the cities with the best quality of life. It is also considered one of the world’s most environmentally friendly cities. The water in the inner harbor is clean and safe for swimming. 36% of all citizens commute to work by bicycle. Every day, they cycle a combined 1.2 million km. Since the turn of the millennium, Copenhagen has seen a strong urban and cultural development and has been described as a boom town. This is partly due to massive investments in cultural facilities as well as infrastructure and a new wave of successful designers, chefs and architects. As of 2010, Copenhagen is ranked as the 10th most expensive city in the world according to Forbes magazine.
    Links: Top Ten Copenhagen Hotels, Top Ten Copenhagen Restaurants, Cities, Sculptures, Top Ten Bridges, Top Ten Fountains, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen,
  2. Roskilde Cathedral
    Roskilde CathedralRoskilde Cathedral1Roskilde Cathedral2Roskilde Cathedral3Roskilde Cathedral4Roskilde Cathedral5Roskilde Cathedral6Roskilde Cathedral7Roskilde Cathedral8
           Roskilde Cathedral, in the city of Roskilde on the Island of Zealand in eastern Denmark, is a cathedral of the Lutheran Church of Denmark. It was the 1st Gothic cathedral to be built of brick and its construction encouraged the spread of this Brick Gothic style throughout Northern Europe. It was built during the 12th and 13th centuries, and incorporates both Gothic and Romanesque architectural features in its design. It was the only cathedral in Zealand until the 20th century, and its twin spires dominate the skyline of the town. Roskilde Cathedral has been the main burial site for Danish monarchs since the 15th century. As such, it has been significantly extended and altered over the centuries as individual rulers have added many burial chapels. Following the Danish Reformation in 1536, the Bishop’s residence was moved to Copenhagen, and he from then on held the title Bishop of Zealand. Royal coronations normally took place in Copenhagen’s Church of Our Lady or in the chapel of Frederiksborg Palace. The cathedral is a major tourist attraction, bringing in over 125,000 visitors annually. A working church, it also hosts concerts throughout the year.
    Links: Top Ten Cathedrals, Top Ten Tombs, Top Ten Sarcophagi, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roskilde_Cathedral,
  3. Skagen
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           Skagen (The Skaw) is a projection of land and a town, with a population of 8,515 (2011), in Region Nordjylland on the northernmost tip of Vendsyssel-Thy, a part of the Jutland peninsula in northern Denmark. Skagen is located in Frederikshavn municipality.
    Links: Paintings, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skagen,
  4. Jelling Runic Stones
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           The Jelling stones are massive carved runestones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. The older of the two Jelling stones was raised by King Gorm the Old in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger of the two stones was raised by King Gorm’s son, Harald Bluetooth in memory of his parents, celebrating his conquest of Denmark and Norway, and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. The runic inscriptions on these stones are considered the most well known in Denmark.
    Links: Sculptures, Top Ten Stones/Rocks, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jelling_stones,
  5. Kronborg Castle, Helsingør
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           Kronborg is a star fortress situated near the town of Helsingør (immortalized as Elsinore in Shakespeare’s Hamlet) on the extreme northeastern tip of Zealand at the narrowest point of the Øresund, the sound between Denmark and Sweden. In this part, the sound is only 4 km wide, hence the strategic importance of maintaining a sea fortress at this location commanding one of the few outlets of the Baltic Sea. The castle has for centuries been one of the most important Renaissance castles in Northern Europe. Along with the fortress Kärnan, Helsingborg on the opposite of Øresund, it controlled the entranceway to the Baltic Sea.
    Links: Sculptures, Castles, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kronborg,
  6. Trelleborg
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           Trelleborg is a locality and the seat of Trelleborg Municipality, Skåne County, Sweden with a population of 28,290 (2010). It is the southernmost town in Sweden.
    Links: Top Ten Forts, Top Ten European Forts, Top Ten Towers, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trelleborg,
  7. Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denmark,

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