Top Ten Dominican Attractions

Top Ten Dominican Attractions

       Dominica is an island nation in the Caribbean Sea. To the north-northwest lies Guadeloupe, to the southeast Martinique. Its size is 750 square km (290 sq mi) and the highest point in the country is Morne Diablotins, which has an elevation of 1,447 m  (4,747 ft). The Commonwealth of Dominica has an estimated population of 72,500. The capital is Roseau. Dominica has been nicknamed the “Nature Isle of the Caribbean” for its unspoiled natural beauty. It is the youngest island in the Lesser Antilles, still being formed by geothermal-volcanic activity, as evidenced by the world’s 2nd largest boiling lake. The island features lush mountainous rainforests, home of many rare plant, animal and birds. The Sisserou Parrot (also known as the Imperial Amazon), the island’s national bird, is featured on the national flag. Dominica’s economy is heavily dependent on both tourism and agriculture. Christopher Columbus named the island after the day of the week on which he spotted it, a Sunday (dominica in Latin), November 3, 1493. In the next 100 years after Columbus’ landing,Dominica remained isolated, and even more Caribs settled there after being driven from surrounding islands as European powers entered the region.France formally ceded possession of Dominica to the UK in 1763. The UK then set up a government and made the island a colony in 1805. The emancipation of African slaves occurred throughout the British Empire in 1834, and, in 1838, Dominica became the first British Caribbean colony to have a legislature controlled by a black majority. In 1896, the UK re-assumed governmental control of Dominica, turning it into a Crown colony. Half a century later, from 1958 to 1962,Dominica became a province of the short-livedWest Indies Federation. In 1978,Dominica became an independent nation.

  1. Calibishie

           Calibishie is a town in Dominica located on the north coast of the island, immediately to the east of the village of Hampstead. The Calibishie Coast Travel Area is thought by many to be the most scenic and unspoiled region of Dominica. Stretching from the rugged mountains of Pennville, through the picturesque fishing village of Calibishie, to the crashing surf of the Marigot beaches, the Calibishie Coast is one of the few areas in the world where you can travel from the seashore to rain forest in little more than a mile. Calibishie is also home to Dominica’s best beaches: Batibou, Hampstead, Hodges, Point Baptiste, Turtle and Woodford Hill Beaches. Lush, tropical, and secluded, the town’s beaches are truly part of what makes it special. The area has palm-fringed beaches, freshwater rivers with secluded bathing pools, tumbling waterfalls and dense rain forest with exotic birds and lush vegetation. Visitors may hike into the rain forest wilderness to catch a glimpse of the colorful Jaco parrot. Take a spin on a mountain bike or take to the sea for great snorkeling and world-class scuba diving. A wide variety of accommodation is available along the coast, from simple guesthouses to cliff side cottages overlooking the sea to a private villa perched on a mountainside. The local population is very friendly and quite a few small, local restaurants have begun to sprout up the meet the needs of growing tourism to the area.
    Links: Top Ten Places to Scuba Dive, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calibishie,
  2. Morne Trois Pitons National Park

           Morne Trois Pitons National Park is a World Heritage Site located in the Caribbean island of Dominica. This area was established as a national park by the Dominican government in July 1975. The National Park is named after its highest mountain, Morne Trois Pitons, meaning mountain of three peaks. The park is a significant area of volcanic activity. Features within the part include the Valley of Desolation, a region of boiling mud ponds and small geysers; the Boiling Lake, Titou Gorge and Emerald Pool.
    Links: National Parks, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morne_Trois_Pitons_National_Park,
  3. Roseau

           Roseau is the capital and largest city of Dominica. With a population of 14,847 (2001), it is a small and compact urban settlement, located within the Saint George parish and surrounded by the Caribbean Sea, the Roseau River and Morne Bruce. Built on the site of the ancient Kalinago Indian village of Sairi, it is the oldest and most important urban settlement on the island. It is located on the west coast of Dominica and is a combination of modern and colonial (French Style) architecture. Roseau is Dominica’s most important port for foreign trade. Some exports include bananas, bay oil, vegetables, grapefruit, oranges and cocoa. The service sector is also a large part of the local economy.
    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roseau,
  4. Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominica,